Buda Engine??
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Thread: Buda Engine??

  1. #1
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    Default Buda Engine??

    A friend has come across a Buda Engine - a four cylinder flathead (diesel?) model HR 217 that looks as though it has been used as stationary engine of some kind since it is mounted in a heavy angle iron frame with an attached instrument panel like one would see in an old truck. I think it did come out of some kind of vehicle originally since it has a transmission with a long shift lever, again like in an old truck. It must have been something rather old since it has a large heavy sprocket making it a chain drive.
    I did a google of Buda engine and found that they made many different types of engines for marine use as well as for trucks and buses and that the company was bought out by Allis Chalmers but was unable to find anything specific on the particular model. Does anybody have idea of where I might look for more info? He wants to sell it and I figure somebody out there wants it and it would be helpful to present it to those who may need/want it. Thanks for any input.

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    See http://www.oldmarineengine.com/discu...3440/3440.html for a bunch of discussion on Buda diesels.

    Generally, if it's a gasoline engine built before WWII it's worth holding onto. This is driven by the "antique value." You may not have an immediate use for such an engine - but there is someone, somewhere that does.

    Generally, if it's a diesel engine built before the Vietnam Conflict (NOT a war) it's worth holding onto for similar reasons. I might even move that date upwards to the overthrow of Saddam Hussein but generally diesels built since then are still in active service.

    The thermodynamic and life performance of most diesels makes them prime movers par excellance for our new "energy short" world. At least one of the reasons for the current premium paid for diesel at the pump is the fact that the oil companies have woken up to the fact that diesel fuel can be more legitimately priced on a "cost per mile" basis. Hence with a promise of 35 percent better fuel milage, diesel fuel should be priced at a 35 percent premium. Or so the logic goes, costs of refining notwithstanding.

    Nevertheless, the oil shortage we are currently undergoing promises only to get worse. Thus the demand for diesels worldwide I expect to only increase.

    If you haven't done so, do yourself (and your children) a favor and read "The Long Emergency" by James Howard Kunstler. It'll open your eyes (Scare the sh*t out of you also) to our current energy problems.

    Best,
    Joe in NH

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    You may try the guys on the Antique truck site being it is a truck engine. http://www.aths.org/
    Pictures would also help to identify this engine.
    Good luck!

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    Gazz:

    Does this have a multi speed transmission or simply a clutch unit with a hand lever for actuation ? If a clutch unit, then it would have been built as a power unit .

    Buda built power units but also for a longer period of time was a supplier of engines to truck and tractor assemblers/builders.

    Buda also built fork lifts and material handling tugs.

    Jim C.

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    The Buda HP 217 model was a 4 cylinder 4 stroke petrol engine developing 47 bhp at 1800 rpm.
    217 cubic inches, 3 13/16" bore, 4 3/4" stroke
    The specs I have give 1937 as manufacture date.

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    I have a little bit of Buda history, a well known proprietary engine builder. The company takes it name from a town in Illinois where the company founder (George Chalender) started out in business in 1881 building railway equipment. The company later moved to Harvey, Chicago and started building engines in 1910. Buda had 110 different truck manufacturers who bought their engines, and 10 who used their engines in cars. They claimed to supply 32% of the US heavy vehicle market in 1924. In 1926 they bought a diesel engine licence from M.A.N. and built stationary and marine diesels. By 1935 they were supplying truck diesels. They later changed to the German Lanova air cell combustion chamber and were known as being high speed diesels.

    A little bit of info about Buda and the Allis-Chalmers connection. Allis-Chalmers used the GM Detroit Diesel two stroke from just before WW2 (e.g. I have seen them in the HD5 crawler). Apparently when GM decided to get into the earthmoving business in the 1950's (they bought Euclid), Allis Chalmers no longer felt safe buying engines from a competitor, so they bought Buda in 1953. The info I have from the 1950's on the Buda diesels shows a 4 or 6 cylinder engine based on the Lanova combustion chamber (as did Mack).

    Good to hear Rosso has identified the engine. Although there have been one or two 'flathead' diesel engines, I doubt they ever were sucessful, and I am sure there are plenty of side valve Buda petrol engines out there.

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    Any way to get pics?
    During the 20's thru 50's alot of smaller construction equipment suppliers used outside suppliers for their powertrain needs. Buda was a major supplier for this market. This engine and transmission combination could very well be used in a road roller, crane. shovel, trencher, etc.

    If I can find the pics... Oil well winch setups used these type of powertrains. There is/was a musuem in Kansas that has several examples of these, IIRC one was a Buda. Last time I was there was back in the early 80's.

    Just a thought.

    Marshall

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    Mid Continent RR muesum in North Freedom Wi has a very old Burro crane {rr section work type} that has a Buda engine. I think this crane is from the 1920's. I started this engine a number of times back in early 70's and ran the crane. The thing looks like it is right out of the "Flintstone" cartoons. Actually it is a wonderful body grabbing machine with exposed gears, clutches and cables. That engine started real easy too, didn't kick back that I remember. Cheers, John.


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