camelback drill press coming together - pix
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  1. #1
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    Default camelback drill press coming together - pix

    Canedy Otto model 36 20" drill press I've been cleaning, painting, and fixing as needed. It's on a modular dolly I built years ago. It has been on that dolly under the canopy visible in the background for a couple weeks now, through some heavy rain, so the dolly and a bit of the base have some rust on them. But they won't for long. Just thought you guys might want to see the pictures.

    metalmagpie








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    Beautiful work! Nice color choice, looks like it could have been factory and contrasts nicely against to bare metal. Is your shop occupied? Not often have I seen anything restored under a Tempo, at least not up here anyways.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dundeeshopnut View Post
    Beautiful work! Nice color choice, looks like it could have been factory and contrasts nicely against to bare metal. Is your shop occupied? Not often have I seen anything restored under a Tempo, at least not up here anyways.
    Thanks, dundeeshopnut. My shop is kind of full, plus the way I'm dealing with a machine that weighs 680 pounds is to roll it out under my gantry crane, lift it and do whatever, then roll it back in. And when it's on the dolly it has quite a large footprint. It will come indoors soon.

    metalmagpie

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    Hi metalmagpie,

    [I] I really do like the restore process you have completed so far. I have a 36 also and I would like to ask a favor. I'm having difficulties rigging mine for a lift, could you please take pictures of your rigging route and the lift the next time you do so? /I]

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    Rain in Seattle? Beautiful work! I love the color and I love the detail you've given the machine and natural areas. That looks like a great DP as well. I don't particularly like you showing the tent as that gives me ideas on how I might expand a bit and take on some more machines. Previously I was comfortably limited by the fact I had to walk through my shop holding my stomach in... but with a tent I'd have plenty of more room... j/k

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    Quote Originally Posted by srjones91740 View Post
    Hi metalmagpie,

    [I] I really do like the restore process you have completed so far. I have a 36 also and I would like to ask a favor. I'm having difficulties rigging mine for a lift, could you please take pictures of your rigging route and the lift the next time you do so? /I]
    If you had the equipment I have you wouldn't be asking. I built a small gantry crane years ago. The hook can go about 13 feet high. So I lifted it with an overhead hook, rigged with a single 3 foot sling with a loop at each end. What I have is not a great picture, but I think you'll get the idea. - metalmagpie


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    Quote Originally Posted by metalmagpie View Post
    Thanks, dundeeshopnut. My shop is kind of full, plus the way I'm dealing with a machine that weighs 680 pounds is to roll it out under my gantry crane, lift it and do whatever, then roll it back in. And when it's on the dolly it has quite a large footprint. It will come indoors soon.

    metalmagpie
    I hear ya. Very tempting to fill a shop with tools, even "cool" machines that will be used very infrequently, but one must also keep room to bring in the equipment that needs working on too. My shop is only 30 by 40 nominally and with a long term repair/project at the back and a "bay" for short term repairs or regular service at the door, the place is fairly worker friendly. Add a few more larger tools though, and things will get tight in a hurry.

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    I haven't done the electricals on this machine yet. The first problem is where to mount the main on/off switch. I decided to form a piece of steel to the same (rough) curvature as my DP body, punch a couple of holes in that curved piece, then drill and tap the drill press body carefully to get it right where I want it. Once it fits I'll turn it into a switch bracket. But for now I had to drill two holes in midair, sideways, low down, and they had to be located dead on. I've had issues with situations like this before. I scratched my head for awhile and this is the setup I came up with to drill the holes. - metalmagpie


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    Default Canedy-Otto 36

    Metal Magpie, your 36 looks good. I just purchased a Canedy-Otto 36, this model has original motor from factory and weighs 973 pounds according to literature. Learning as I go along. Just cleaned motor. It is GE 1916 patent date, 3 phase, 1735 rpm, 1" shaft. Figuring I will have motor rewound and use phase converter unless someone reading this has a single phase of this type/model.
    Would certainly appreciate any info, insight or other words of wisdom as I start restoring this.
    canedyottodrillpress.jpg1916gemotor1inchshaft1735rpm.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by CigarStoreFigure View Post
    metalmagpie, your 36 looks good. I just purchased a Canedy-Otto 36, this model has original motor from factory and weighs 973 pounds according to literature. Learning as I go along. Just cleaned motor. It is GE 1916 patent date, 3 phase, 1735 rpm, 1" shaft. Figuring I will have motor rewound and use phase converter unless someone reading this has a single phase of this type/model.
    Would certainly appreciate any info, insight or other words of wisdom as I start restoring this.
    I would take the cover off your motor's junction box and look at the wires going into the motor. As long as the insulation isn't completely gone or if the motor smells seriously burnt, it will probably work fine. Plus it probably doesn't have a standard frame (NEMA) so you'd have to adapt a different motor to fit. So I suggest you keep the motor. How to run a 3 phase motor at home? You're right, a phase converter can work. Beware - lots of the little commercial ones are LOUD. You can also buy a VFD and wire it in. But you need some sophisticated electrical skills for that.

    Why get the motor rewound? That's like $1200! Oh, I see - you mean rewound from 3 phase to single phase. I highly doubt that would be cost efficient.

    It's probably a 1 hp or 1.5hp motor. It's easy to buy a single phase motor in this horsepower range. But it probably won't have a 1" shaft. You could machine a bushing to allow you to fit the gear on a single phase motor's shaft, but you need some machining skills for that and I don't know if you do or not. The motor shaft height would have to match and the motor's bolt-down bolt pattern would have to match or be adapted. Possible, but lots of fiddly stuff. Maybe replace the bearings but I'd keep that motor as long as you can.

    metalmagpie

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    Quote Originally Posted by CigarStoreFigure View Post
    Metal Magpie, your 36 looks good. I just purchased a Canedy-Otto 36, this model has original motor from factory and weighs 973 pounds according to literature. Learning as I go along. Just cleaned motor. It is GE 1916 patent date, 3 phase, 1735 rpm, 1" shaft. Figuring I will have motor rewound and use phase converter unless someone reading this has a single phase of this type/model.
    Would certainly appreciate any info, insight or other words of wisdom as I start restoring this.
    canedyottodrillpress.jpg1916gemotor1inchshaft1735rpm.jpg
    Hello again.

    I would absolutely try to keep that motor. Not so sure about the gear, that seems a bit funky, but if that's how the factory did it, then it's probably fine. Rewinding isn't cost effective as magpie said, and certainly not something to if not necessary. VFD or RPC if you plan to get more old equipment is the way to go.

    Maybe replace the bearings but I'd keep that motor as long as you can.
    For that age they are almost certainly Babbitt with slinger rings. The good news is that if they were kept oiled, then they should be unworn, and nearly silent! The motor on my Royersford is the quitest in the shop.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ClappedOutBport View Post
    For that age they are almost certainly Babbitt with slinger rings. The good news is that if they were kept oiled, then they should be unworn, and nearly silent! The motor on my Royersford is the quitest in the shop.
    There can be many decades difference between the age of a machine and the age of its patent. That is a late model Canedy Otto as you can tell because it was never set up to be powered by overhead line shafts like all the early ones were.

    That said, plain motor bearings can be very quiet.

    But ClappedOutBport and I both agree - keep the motor if possible.

    metalmagpie

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    Yes, but if you've seen enough vintage motors you start to get a feel for the age. Mine looks much more modern and is still Babbitt. That definitely looks pre-30s to me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by metalmagpie View Post
    There can be many decades difference between the age of a machine and the age of its patent. That is a late model Canedy Otto as you can tell because it was never set up to be powered by overhead line shafts like all the early ones were.

    That said, plain motor bearings can be very quiet.

    But ClappedOutBport and I both agree - keep the motor if possible.

    metalmagpie
    YES, the same model 36 was most likely first developed to use a line belt drive off the ceiling in a factory, however both versions were offered in the Canedy-Otto catalog no 12 (undated). The motorized version uses many of the same casting as the line drive version. Even has the boss cast in the base for the lever to operated the line drive clutch.canedy36.jpgcanedymotorized.jpg

    Interesting that they charged almost twice as much for the gear driven motor option on the 36 in that same catalog. Model 36 belt driven $150, Model 36 motor drive $250. Either way that was a lot of money back then...
    Also the belt driven model 36 is listed at 680 pounds
    The gear driven motor option 36 973 pounds. I thought that motor was pretty heavy...not sure where the rest of the weight comes from (motor bracket is heavy, flywheel not so much).

    The motor bracket itself on the one I have is different than shown in this catalog, but taking it apart, I am sure it is original. It is a heavy cast piece made especially for this drill press bolt pattern etc. Assuming there was some reason they changed the bracket lowering the motor height. Near as I can tell, it actually mounts more substantially than the one shown in the catalog drawing.

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    I got the old machine running. It runs fine, although the back gears are a bit noisy. I shot a very amateurish video. Enjoy - metalmagpie

    http://nwnative.us/Grant/movies/itRuns.mp4

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    Great job mag pie! My gears are reasonably noisy in backgear as well. Just the nature of the beast.

    BTW, I would highly, highly recommend switching to drum a switch. I use mine frequently for tapping. I ran a 3/4-10 the other day in one of my tap collets, and that saved a lot of grunt by hand.

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    Default HELP Need Canedy Otto 36 quill stop

    canedy36-quillstop1a.jpgcanedy36-quillstop1b.jpg
    As I am slowly cleaning and stripping paint on the Canedy-Otto model #36 camelback drill press, first problem. The quill stop is broken and apparently has been for a LONG time (two different repaint colors were in the break etc.).

    Does anyone have one of these they would please sell me?

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    Silver solder it back together- or have someone do so.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CigarStoreFigure View Post
    canedy36-quillstop1a.jpgcanedy36-quillstop1b.jpg
    As I am slowly cleaning and stripping paint on the Canedy-Otto model #36 camelback drill press, first problem. The quill stop is broken and apparently has been for a LONG time (two different repaint colors were in the break etc.).

    Does anyone have one of these they would please sell me?
    I made patterns for those that are at the foundry now waiting until they're ready to pour bronze. If you want to spring for a new set of castings (you have to machine them) send me a PM and we'll get it going.

    But anyone trained with a torch could braze those up.

    metalmagpie

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    Quote Originally Posted by metalmagpie View Post
    I made patterns for those that are at the foundry now waiting until they're ready to pour bronze. If you want to spring for a new set of castings (you have to machine them) send me a PM and we'll get it going.

    But anyone trained with a torch could braze those up.

    metalmagpie
    I would buy one in bronze, but curious why you are not making these in iron?


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