Carroll Jamieson lathe.
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  1. #1
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    Default Carroll Jamieson lathe.

    My first post so be kind. I have a really old Carroll Jamieson lathe. The serial number is 1155 so if I am decoding the number correctly it was built in 1911. I have two questions about it. The crossfeed has had a new nut installed at some point and I do not think it is the same as original. I am wondering if someone out there has a picture of the original. The feed was binding as you move it toward the handwheel. If I loosen the bolt holding the brass crossfeed nut it frees up so the bolt is forcing the spindle and it is binding in the bushing. Of course the hole is slotted so you must have the bolt tightened. I have made up something that overcomes the problem but I would like to try and make something that would bring it back to original.

    My second problem is one of the adjustable guides in the compound is broken. So my question is about the taper. Is there some sort of standard that all manufacturers use? If I had access to another lathe I would simply measure it but unfortunately I do not. Failing any replacement does someone have a welding procedure that will work.

    I also have a very old completely hand operated Garvin Machine Co. mill. Very small and it looks like someone scrapped the original drive and built something. My lathe never had a threading dial so used the mill to cut a 24 tooth gear to run off the 6 tpi lead screw. I made up an indexing head to get the spacing on the gear. Actually worked out fine.

    Any help on the lathe is appreciated.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CJ User View Post
    The crossfeed has had a new nut installed at some point and I do not think it is the same as original. I am wondering if someone out there has a picture of the original.
    Not impossible. But more to the point, whomever fitted it may not have addressed the need of a new screw - which may have very uneven wear. So among other things, you need to "dig deeper" before taking a decision on how far to go and in what direction.

    Likewise you describe the classical issue of the top slide of the cross binding towards the ends. That's the usual "hourglass" wear pattern, and again, you need to assess it in more depth before taking a decision as to how far in what direction .. etc.

    Same again the broken "gib" for the compound. If Cast Iron? There have been SOME where TiG welding was used to repair a break at an adjuster screw notch at one end, but mostly one makes a NEW one. Bronze and NOT "Brass" might be easier to use than CI.

    I also have a very old completely hand operated Garvin Machine Co. mill. Very small and it looks like someone scrapped the original drive and built something.
    Good on yah. You can rig plenty of ways to (re)power it if need be.

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    Thanks for the quick reply Thermite. You are absolutely correct about the crossfeed screw. When you are using the centre area of the screw there is a LOT of clearance, backlash or slop, whatever your preferred term is. But if you are working from the ends of the screw there is very little. So my take on that is the problem is the screw and not the nut.

    What I did to overcome the binding issue was getting rid of the bolt holding the nut to the cross. I fitted a piece of 5/8" keystock to the slot in the cross. I drilled and reamed a 3/8 hole in it and machined a short piece with 1/2" NC to thread into the nut and the top portion is a very nice fit in the 3/8 hole in the keystock. Then I machined the keystock so it was just below the surface of the cross when in that slot. That is locked in place with a piece of 1/4 x 2 FB. Two 1/4 bolts pull the keystock up to the flatbar. There were two 3/8 nc holes in the cross that I used to bolt the FB. That allows the nut to move vertically a little if needed or swivel a little as well. It works well but I just would like to make it back to original if I can find out what it looked like in 1911. The lathe is powered by a 2 HP motor and I picked up an old AutoDrive unit (probably 1940's vintage and I have the original manual) with 4 speeds. So coupled up with the backgear I have 8 speeds. The lathe is old but I have built a number of projects and worked to close tolerances (.001"). You have to go slow and be careful.

    Not sure if I can fab the gib for the compound. I do not think the old mill would do it. Have to give that project more thought.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CJ User View Post
    Thanks for the quick reply Thermite. You are absolutely correct about the crossfeed screw. When you are using the centre area of the screw there is a LOT of clearance, backlash or slop, whatever your preferred term is. But if you are working from the ends of the screw there is very little. So my take on that is the problem is the screw and not the nut.

    What I did to overcome the binding issue was getting rid of the bolt holding the nut to the cross. I fitted a piece of 5/8" keystock to the slot in the cross. I drilled and reamed a 3/8 hole in it and machined a short piece with 1/2" NC to thread into the nut and the top portion is a very nice fit in the 3/8 hole in the keystock. Then I machined the keystock so it was just below the surface of the cross when in that slot. That is locked in place with a piece of 1/4 x 2 FB. Two 1/4 bolts pull the keystock up to the flatbar. There were two 3/8 nc holes in the cross that I used to bolt the FB. That allows the nut to move vertically a little if needed or swivel a little as well. It works well but I just would like to make it back to original if I can find out what it looked like in 1911. The lathe is powered by a 2 HP motor and I picked up an old AutoDrive unit (probably 1940's vintage and I have the original manual) with 4 speeds. So coupled up with the backgear I have 8 speeds. The lathe is old but I have built a number of projects and worked to close tolerances (.001"). You have to go slow and be careful.

    Not sure if I can fab the gib for the compound. I do not think the old mill would do it. Have to give that project more thought.
    Well.. pragmatism. If you can sort what you just described as a jackleg repair you "have the knowledge" to figure s**t out and JFDI. Buy a length of acme threaded screw stock and a stock nut or a set of taps, Bronze is what you want, BTW, never "Brass" - that's for decorative use and bells - and make it new.

    Can't find gudance on C-J's? Read what Hendey, South Bend, or any other older lathe owners have had to do.

    ADAPT as needed.

    Same with the gib. Cast iron in thin section is a b***h. A Bronze will make a durable gib for lower risk of breaking, can be easily straightened, will need less labour.

    Who cares what ANY of it USED TO look like?

    If it fits right, works right, runs OK, and don't look TOO DAMNED fugly?

    It IS "right".

    That simple. Other fish in life to electrocute. It ain't a grounded Faster Than Light anti-gravity Starship with an automatic ass-wiper and and Idiot repulsor field, is it?


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    CMM (the milling machine folks) liked 5/32 per foot on their taper gibs

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    I will check out the ones you mentioned....Hendy, South Bend. I had a look this morning and I could not find anyone in Canada selling LHT acme threaded rod. I did find one company that sold metric and one USA company but they do not ship to Canada. I can certainly carry on using what I made but I would have liked to make it look more original. It would serve no purpose other than that. I guess the answer to your question is "me". When my son cleans out the garage and hauls everything to the scrapyard no one will comment on how nice that crossfeed looks. I will have to locate a piece of bronze for the gib. And you are right.....not a starship.

    johnoder Thanks for the info on the taper.

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    Green Bay Manufacturing

    nice source of acme threaded rods/nuts- good stuff, I've bought from them before.


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