Chicago Pneumatic Drill. Intended use? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    At one time (late 1960's when I was attending Alfred University), Wellsville was home to a Worthington Pump Plant and an Air Pre-heater plant. Driving through Corning on Route 17, IR had a plant on the west end with a sign reading "World's Largest Compressor Plant". The village of Alfred itself was the location of Rogers Machine Works, builder of the Rogers "Perfect 36" VTL and the Erie Lackawanna RR repaired diesels in the old Erie RR shop in Hornell. We go up to Bath to visit friends usually once a year--all gone now.

    Tom B.

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    Default air driil

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeE. View Post
    I've had this forever, no clue where I got it.

    It runs, on air, at a real low rpm. Not sure how much torque it has, didn't test it.
    Must have a morse taper socket chuck, I guess. I haven't tried to get that bit out of there.

    It's painted in olive drab, so that tells me it was government issued at one time.

    When turned, the 4 pronged hand wheel on the top forces that "center point" to rise. I'm guessing you use it to exert downward force on the bit as it turns.


    Attachment 267058

    In what situation would one of these be used

    Attachment 267059

    Attachment 267060

    Attachment 267061


    Would it be used for drilling? How about turning the tool to swage boiler flues?
    Hello, Your drill was made by Chicago Pneumatic in Utica N.Y. Non Rev. Spare parts are more than likely still out there. for sure bearing and rotor blades/vanes. I may have a parts/instruction book if interested. Be careful.

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  5. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by cheesehead33 View Post
    Hello, Your drill was made by Chicago Pneumatic in Utica N.Y. Non Rev. Spare parts are more than likely still out there. for sure bearing and rotor blades/vanes. I may have a parts/instruction book if interested. Be careful.
    Should have added you are missing the throttle handle. ON/Off they came with either a lever or roll type.

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    From what I have read (e.g. Dawn of the Diesel Age by John F. Kirkland), Ingersoll Rand seem to have built the most successful U.S. diesel engines for locomotives during the 1920's. Apparently they were (initially anyway) built at the Rathbone Gas Engine Plant at Toledo, then shipped to Phillipsburg, N.J. Perhaps that was only a preliminary arrangement. These engines used solid injection.

    I would like to write more, but its late here...

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    I worked for a construction company one time that used pneumatic drills to bore holes in timbers for mounting to fender systems on the sides of docks...They used auger bits for that....Cheers; Ramsay 1

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    Pneumatic tools were also widely used in the automobile assembly process. As a kid I worked at a Fisher Body plant in Janesville WI. They had thousands of pneumatic tools as opposed to electric. The plant had air connections at every work station from the frame assembly area to the finish polishing area. Pneumatic tools were the tools of choice since there was no concern about motors shorting out, water contamination, or wear on electrical cords.

    At one time I operated a station that drilled holes in truck fenders to attach chrome trim. The station had a fixture for each fender, with each fixture having in the neighborhood of 100 drills each for different trim patterns. There was a computer printer station (keep in mind this was the 1960's) that printed out the schedule truck by truck. The printout included the trim pattern, job number, and color of each job in order of production.

    You would read the print and set the patterns using a series of push buttons and levers on the fixtures. Once the pattern was set the fenders would be inserted in the fixtures and locked in place. The operator then activated the drills using a pair of hand levers attached to the pneumatic drills. Both levers had to be actuated simultaneously to insure the operators hands were out of the danger zone.

    Once the holes were drilled the fixtures would release the fenders. They then had to be removed and hung vertically on a moving chain for the next person to attach the chrome trim. It was a busy job. A pair of fenders had to be removed from the incoming line, placed in the fixtures, drill patterns set, holes drilled, and fenders removed every 2 1/2 to 3 minutes depending on the line speed.

    The job paid well for the time, but it did make me realize it wasn't what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. Fortunately I was going to school by day, and working the second shift to pay rent and tuition. I worked there from 1968 to 1972. After graduation in 72 I left never to return.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gmach10 View Post
    Nick name for these were "Widow Makers". Older Iron Workers had to use these when erecting buildings. These had a shit load of torque, holding them and trying not to get knocked off the building and falling to your death kinda thing. I helped used a pair of these to raise the Cermak Road Scherzer Rolling lift bridge during a major rebuild in place of the main motors. Yeah that kinda torque!
    Like Dis' ?...
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    Maybe the wrong thread to mention an electric power tool?

    For a bit of variety - in far-flung parts of the Empire we had a choice of British-made power tools (plus the U.S. brands like Miller Falls etc).

    Not plastic ones, the older metal-bodied type.

    The British brands I know were Wolf, Desoutter Brothers and Black & Decker (British made). There must have been others e.g. I just came across an Australian brand: Lightburn.

    Recently I bought a heavy duty Wolf drill, on a Wolf drill press. I bought it for the box of morse taper drills included, but have discovered the whole thing is very sturdy and might be useful when you need to take a drill press to the job.

    (Many years ago my father saw a man being electrocuted while using a metal-bodied drill. He wasn't able to release his grip until my father un-plugged the cord. 240 volts in NZ. So we were never allowed to use one without an isolating transformer. I wonder if the modern earth leakage things are adequate for safety?)

    It is a Wolf 1 1/4" Heavy Duty Drill, Type NW10D with No. 3 Morse taper and a no-load speed of 270 rpm. The usual pipe thread handle on one side. The drill press column is solid steel, not some lightweight tubing. I detest the usual home workshop "drill press" with clamp-on drill, this one is different.

    It has 2 x small bakelite caps marked "Spare Brushes".

    What surprised me is that the same drill and drill press are still being made and sold in India, spare parts included. I might try and get a new trigger casing/handle for it (it has been broken and welded).

    According to their website, Ralliwolf was established over 55 years ago in collaboration with Wolf.

    Heavy Duty Drill NW10 31mm, Heavy Duty Drill Manufacturer and Supplier

    Drill Stands Manufacturer, Magnetic Drill Stand, Electric Drills Stands

    Power Tools Manufacturers, Electric Power Tools, Welding Machines Suppliers



    wolf-drill-press-01.jpg wolf-drill-press-03.jpg wolf-drill-press-07.jpg wolf-drill-press-04.jpgwolf-drill-press-06.jpg


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