Compendium of ALL known screw threads... - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe in NH View Post
    My son just returned the file as a more standard Excel file (.xls) and as a PDF. So far I'm not making the xls work as this would allow "sorting" but the PDF has all the information sorted according to the original HTML which I first used as a Google file.

    It's late now, but I'll mess around with this tomorrow.

    Joe in NH
    Son has translated this file,

    But I found the HTML equivalent of the PDF he sent at Compilation of Thread Size Informatoin

    Joe in NH

  2. #22
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    jd-2017-dscn8249.jpg

    Is this one in there?

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  4. #23
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    Fly press head??

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  6. #24
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    Ha, some list. No RMS microscope thread. No 1/2-40. Amateurs.

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  8. #25
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    Joe and others following this thread.In my reference library I have a book entitled "Guide to World Screw Threads" edited by P. A. Sidders First American Edition. It was originally printed by The Machinery Publishing Co. Ltd. New England House, New England Street, Brighton, BN14HN, England. My edition is the American release of the 20th British edition and was "rescued" from the engineering Department of the Union Carbide Chemicals plant in South Charleston WV when my father retired prior to that facility shutting down.

    The Library of Congress Catalog Card Number is 71-185990. ISBN 0-8311-1092-9. This is a 317 page book of threads both standard and specialty such as German glass closure threads Telegraph insulator (Cordeaux)threads, French automobile threads and Horological threads as a sample. . I have no idea if it is available in print or on line

    T W Hudson

    EDIT: Does have Microscope, endoscope and optical threads in it, will look for 1/2-40 threads. 1/2-26, 32, 40 are covered in the British Model Engineers thread section although, only the 1/2-26 is fully spec'd out.
    Last edited by Hudson; 11-16-2020 at 08:40 PM.

  9. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Conrad Hoffman View Post
    Ha, some list. No RMS microscope thread. No 1/2-40. Amateurs.
    No 3/8 NPT either.

    What got this going was a period Kerosene Lamp Font which is missing it's filler plug. The plug appears to be 11/16-20. The chart shows this as "WPIPE" thread - which is not any standard I'm familiar with - and like BSW may not be in common US use.

    Attempting to correlate this 11/16 thread with a 3/8 pipe plug (18TPI) revealed the omission.

    I may use a rubber stopper as an expedient plug. Sometimes the best solutions are the easiest.

    Joe in NH

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    Also missing is 1/2-12 US.

  11. #28
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    Your book is not big enough for all of the odd ball threads I have dealt with over the years... Ken

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  13. #29
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    I totally agree!

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    I have a copy of "The Robertson Guide to World Screw Thread Series Symbols" compiled by W. H. A. Robertson & Co. Ltd. of Lynton Works, Bedford. England.
    There doesn't seem to be a date on it but it lists over 180 thread forms with thread angles from 10 degrees to 90 degrees!
    Truly incredible with some forms that I cannot understand how they can be fitted together.
    Has anyone seen Dardalet thread or German Barrel Plug or even Klammergewinde BearingForm!!
    I also had a thread sizes book by the same company that ran to about 450 pages but I loaned it out to someone and never got it back.
    On the point of standardization, I was asked to repair a Church Clock that was made in about 1640 and every nut was different and would only fit the original bolt. We only found out when we had removed about 20 bolts!!!

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  16. #31
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    #25 Hudson
    "... "Guide to World Screw Threads" edited by P. A. Sidders First American Edition. It was originally printed by The Machinery Publishing Co. Ltd. New England House, New England Street, Brighton, BN14HN, England."

    Joe in NH, permission please, to temporarily, hijack your thread.
    Justification, nostalgia.

    The Machinery Publishing Co. Ltd, Registered Office Clifton House 87-113 Euston Road London NW1, also produced a series of practical guides called "The Yellow Back Series".
    I have about a dozen of these, somewhere. Two, which are in reach of my keyboard, were printed in 1958.
    These were once the bee's knees on the shop floor.
    If Mark, Sami and Tyrone are old enough, I am sure they will remember them.

    End of hijack, normal service will be resumed.

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  18. #32
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    Joe in NH, permission please, to temporarily, hijack your thread.
    Not a problem. I have already started looking at some of the alternates suggested.

    And yes (to answer earlier posters) NOT every thread possible to be made is listed. There is not a way for someone to list EVERY thread extant. I think the original generator of the list (part of AutoCad/AutoDesk IIRC) took the threads he felt would be of "use."

    Any list you see is SOMEONE's take on "use."

    If the thread keeps going long enough, perhaps we will cover THEM ALL?

    I doubt it though.

    Joe in NH

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    After this is done we could have a thread entitled: "Compendium of all known paint colors."

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    "I doubt it though."

    Joe in NH[/QUOTE]

    Agree, especially when you consider per-standardization days when blacksmith made their own taps and screwplates.

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    Same thing with traditional clockmaking. All you need is a screwplate to make matching taps and screws. The standard is completely irrelevant as long as the screw fits and tightens well enough.
    My personal belief, based on long experience with early English clocks is that BA threads are an evolutionary outgrowth of the standard Stubbs screwplate sizes. I can't think of another explaination of why a BA screw thread is almost always a very good match to existing threads on a 200++ year old clock. I have no evidence to back this up, just years of experience.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrStretch View Post
    ... The standard is completely irrelevant as long as the screw fits and tightens well enough.
    ...
    Weston Company makes electrical meters. The were making meters before threads became standardized, and as a result had their own tool, die, and standards division for screw threads. They never saw fit to adopt anyone else's standards.

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    I have to question any source that says UN means Unified National.

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    I came across this thread about threads while searching for information about the chart.

    For more than 10 years I have used the same Excel blue and yellow version of this chart as awander in post #17. Dated 20080107 it has as its third author Michael M. Jones, Milan, Tennessee, it has an additional last column with thread angle, and it has additional information about Edison, V, S&H and Dunlop threads. I recently noticed an error and so started to look, unsuccessfully, for my original source in case I had corrupted it. It appears not as all versions I found of it have the same error. In case anyone else uses it apart for the odd typo here’s what I found that I think should be corrected, I did this by comparing older versions with the earlier Jones version.

    ½” UNC is wrong, it should be 13tpi I think the row should read

    1/2 UNC 0.500 12.70 13.0 1.954 0.4056 10.302 0.0438 1.113 60º

    I also usually find M12 fine has a 1.25 pitch rather than 1.50 so I have altered my line to

    M12 Fine 0.472 12.00 20.3 1.250 0.4121 10.467 0.0302 0.767 60º but I realise that fine metric pitches vary particularly between European and Japanese manufacturers

    While I was busy with this I also had a look at the version second authored by Ian W. Wright and also posted in HTML form by Bolo, and ods form by Journeyman, I think the 12mm spark plug line is incorrect, I think 12mm spark plugs have a 1.25mm thread. I couldn’t find a reference for spark plug tolerances so have just substituted the M12 fine one the same as above.

    12MM SPARK 0.4724 12 20.3 1.250 0.4121 10.467 0.0302 0.767

    The 1/8 BSP thread is incorrectly designated 3/8.

    Also this chart has the “WHIT” designation missing at 1 1/8 and 1 3/4.

    Sorry this is rather trivial but it’s snowing and we are locked down.

    Chris


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