Daf Motor Works (1971)
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Surbiton, surrey, UK
    Posts
    1,634
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2015
    Likes (Received)
    1051

    Default Daf Motor Works (1971)

    Something for everyone


    Cheers
    D

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Lambertville, MI USA
    Posts
    2,606
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1080
    Likes (Received)
    1168

    Default

    When I saw the DAF I thought East German, but its not its Dutch.

    Here's another video. YouTube

  3. Likes Peter S liked this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Norfolk, UK
    Posts
    19,023
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    14528
    Likes (Received)
    14622

    Default

    This is the car they were building DAF 55 DAF 55 - Wikipedia

    With the infamous ''Variomatic'' transmission Variomatic - Wikipedia

    As I recall - for what they were, the 55's were okay

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Lower Thumb, Michigan
    Posts
    220
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    51
    Likes (Received)
    161

    Default

    Thanks for posting this, , Demon73,
    I was hired as Machine Repair to a shop that had dozens of those deep draw toggle presses, as seen early in the film.
    Ours were 2500 ton Verson, making deep auto and truck bumpers.
    Half of the press was under the floor, in the basement, where scrap conveyors moved razorblade sharp shards in the dim incandescent light, to all converge to dump into a giant pit, where overhead crane operators used a huge electromagnet to load rail cars.
    Extremely filthy, greasy and deadly work.
    Nothing like the sanitary conditions of that film!
    5 men were killed in various, horrible ways, in the 5 years I was there.

    The year before I hired in, they ran the line just as in the film, with two men loading steel by hand into the press, two men taking it out, two more loading the next station, and on, with usually 7 presses in each line.
    The line I worked the most once had at least 14 men reaching in and out of the jaws of each monster.
    When I got there, there was one guy at the front of the line, watching to make sure only one part went in, and two guys on the end, watching for bad parts.
    11 manual labor jobs gone.

    They had recently installed DC motors on top of the presses to regulate the speeds, and suction cupped hands on huge mechanical arms, operated by cams, about 2 inches thick, almost three feet tall on the rise, that would reach in and out of the beasts in a coordinated stream.

    Working with the electrician, we could get those presses flowing like a symphony.

    Stepping back in awe of tons of iron and steel in pure beauty of fluid motion as the parts would CAchonk, slam, rattle, screech and rumble through the line, sending shivers up the mechanic's spine as the cams pulled those arms out of the never stopping dies at the very last second and carrying a new piece in, looking so close to crashing into the arm removing the worked piece out of the die, and at the end, placing a complete bumper on a conveyor to head off to equally automated polishing, and plating lines.....

    ...until some stupid "manager" wanted to see it push more parts out the back and would turn the knob on the first press, the deep draw toggle, to speed it up and destroy the symmetry of the entire line!
    If nothing crashed, it might take several hours to get back to the ballet, and if crashed, as often was the case, days, to repair.

    The outer ram would clamp the sheet, with an adjusted pressure to hold just enough to allow the inner ram to form the part.
    Too loose, the part would wrinkle, too tight, and the steel would split.
    Maybe you can imagine the shimming and adjusting to make good parts on old machines that had cycled hundreds of thousands of times, with little downtime in decades...

    Fond memories.

    But, back on topic, when my brother found this DAF auto engine, I did some research, and somewhere I read that these cars are relatively rare in their home country, in the Netherlands, because the variable speed drives would go just as fast in reverse as forward and so, many were destroyed as a perfect Demolition Derby car!

    Mike

    daf.jpg

  6. Likes Peter S, Demon73, Pathogen liked this post
  7. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Manchester, England
    Posts
    8,434
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1248
    Likes (Received)
    5378

    Default

    An electrician I worked with had one in the early 1970's, he used to give me a lift home in it.

    Regards Tyrone.

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Surbiton, surrey, UK
    Posts
    1,634
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2015
    Likes (Received)
    1051

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rustyironism View Post
    Fond memories.

    Mike
    Cheers for taking the time to type that out Mike, was an interesting read

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    494
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    49

    Default

    I remember the DAF 55 from the 70s. Not a particularly attractive car, but with a unique feature: due to the Variomatic, it could reverse at full speed - a hair-raising experience.

  10. #8
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    4,483
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1724
    Likes (Received)
    479

    Default

    It was interesting to see big diesel engines being machined in the films and also to see DAF trucks being assembled.

    As far as I know, currently DAF designs and builds the larger engines for Paccar (who have owned DAF trucks for many years). Having said that, Paccar was building an engine plant in the USA a while back, so perhaps the DAF (Paccar) engines are now US-built for that market?

    I think I read recently that DAF was the largest selling truck in the UK, presumably in the larger classes.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •