Diamond Tool Co. Mill Vertical Head/1932 Chet Gardner Sprint Car! - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Yes, it’s what I call the Rolls Canardly. Came with those super billet Ardun heads only available from the Spectre isle at AutoZone. Yes, the Spectre isle; home of plastichrome skulls, carbon fiber shifter knobs & sticky-tape Buick portholes!

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheOldCar View Post
    Yes, it’s what I call the Rolls Canardly. Came with those super billet Ardun heads only available from the Spectre isle at AutoZone. Yes, the Spectre isle; home of plastichrome skulls, carbon fiber shifter knobs & sticky-tape Buick portholes!
    Frontenac heads, if you please! Start having congress with motors as already HAD "overhead" valves, next thing you know you've transmogrified from a Dom top to a sub bottom and can expect to come to a bad end off the back of it.



    Now the MILLING head. Lots of lore on PM as to how Diamond and Fray, was it? Got up to various acts of swapping fluids such as draughtsman's india ink and the various cast & machined offspring spawned off it.

    Where "Brown" fits, OTOH, might need input from the elders. BeePee, Dalrae, Rusnok, Volstro, Rambaudi, and a few others made general-purpose & speciality add-on heads for the whole industry. Some still do.

    Perhaps Brown used to do as well? If so, there will have been adverts in period journals.

  3. #23
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    Sounds like Brown was an independent shop.
    Aviation Week, 10/29/1951:

    "Vertical milling head with micrometer
    precision for angle boring and milling
    on horizontal milling machines is an-
    nounced by a California firm. A vertical
    spindle with travel of 1J to 5 in. has a
    micrometer feed calibrated in .001 in.
    increments. Gear rating is li to 15
    hp, running in oil. Twenty-five models
    are available from Brown Mill Tool
    Co, 5445 San Fernando Road West.
    Los Angeles"

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  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rudd View Post
    Sounds like Brown was an independent shop.
    Aviation Week, 10/29/1951:

    "Vertical milling head with micrometer
    precision for angle boring and milling
    on horizontal milling machines is an-
    nounced by a California firm. A vertical
    spindle with travel of 1J to 5 in. has a
    micrometer feed calibrated in .001 in.
    increments. Gear rating is li to 15
    hp, running in oil. Twenty-five models
    are available from Brown Mill Tool
    Co, 5445 San Fernando Road West.
    Los Angeles"
    Thank you!

  6. #25
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    You're welcome!
    I'd be curious to see the belt set-up on the back, and how that head is driven. No big deal, just curiosity. I have a Porter Cable head that fits my Sheldon, but ended up getting a vertical mill before I figured out a decent way to drive it. (Still have the Sheldon, which I think is a descendant of the Diamond through Vernon.)

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  8. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rudd View Post
    You're welcome!
    I'd be curious to see the belt set-up on the back, and how that head is driven. No big deal, just curiosity. I have a Porter Cable head that fits my Sheldon, but ended up getting a vertical mill before I figured out a decent way to drive it. (Still have the Sheldon, which I think is a descendant of the Diamond through Vernon.)
    I’ll get some pictures once I get back from Idaho. It did look a bit homemade...

  9. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyanidekid View Post
    P.S., anyone have any original Leo Goosen shop drawings for sale? do any still exist?
    Gordon Eliot White had the Harry A. Miller (for whom Leo worked) drawing collection - don't know if he is still alive

    Geniuses? The one and only one that I know of here is John Oder
    Thanks Ken, but I would apply that moniker to my brother Harry instead - user name Rusty Sparks

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  11. #28
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    [QUOTE=johnoder;3377892]Gordon Eliot White had the Harry A. Miller (for whom Leo worked) drawing collection - don't know if he is still alive

    I met Gordon White a few times,about 25-30 years ago. He was selling a Bridgeport milling machine. It was pretty beat but usable and I knew that others had inspected it and walked away. A real gentleman and great to talk with. I kept lingering and looking it over because it was better than any vertical mill I had. It was also relatively close to my residence. When I mentioned wear, he gave me a look and produced his new book "Offenhauser" for me to look thru.
    I wasn't familiar with those engines or the Millers but shop photos showed banks Of Bridgeports and other milling machines working on engines. He said that his was one of them. He let me disassemble and remove the Bridgeport at generous times.
    Of course I have a signed issue of that book. The machine dates to 1956 when the V Ram was introduced. Cool guy.

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  13. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    Gordon Eliot White had the Harry A. Miller (for whom Leo worked) drawing collection - don't know if he is still alive
    It's possible that they are online. I had a link to them once but because the connection was intolerably slow, never got to see if it was still functioning. But maybe someone with faster internut could research that ...

  14. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    The geniuses are all on vacation.
    Sami- I busted out laughing from your comment.
    It is the perfect line at this moment in time for me.
    Thanks!

    -D

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    That's a nice looking machine! Wish I had a head like that for my P&W 3C.

  16. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rudd View Post
    You're welcome!
    I'd be curious to see the belt set-up on the back, and how that head is driven. No big deal, just curiosity. I have a Porter Cable head that fits my Sheldon, but ended up getting a vertical mill before I figured out a decent way to drive it. (Still have the Sheldon, which I think is a descendant of the Diamond through Vernon.)
    I had a Sheldon with the Porter cable head. It was driven by a sheave at the back end of of the horizontal spindle. Tension on the belt was adjusted by a variable sheave pulley on the vertical head shaft.

  17. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by steamachine View Post
    I had a Sheldon with the Porter cable head. It was driven by a sheave at the back end of of the horizontal spindle. Tension on the belt was adjusted by a variable sheave pulley on the vertical head shaft.
    Yeah, that's what I tried too, only I already had an adjustable sheave for the end of the spindle, so it went there.
    There isn't enough room to get the sheaves far enough apart so prevent slippage if you want any increase in speed from the spindle rotation, and running the 1/2" max endmill even at top spindle speed isn't fast enough. Well, maybe if you were using carbon steel tools. Maybe then it might be fast enough.

  18. #34
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    I use a Porter Cable head on an older flat belt Burke #4 horizontal. Made an arbor with shaft extending through the rear of the spindle and link it to the P/C drive shaft with a roller chain and sprocket set-up. It only yields a single speed of course but eliminates slippage.

    Tom B.


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