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  1. #21
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    I'd leave it where it was found, myself. As an exemplar of something unusual, great, it is that. Doesn't make it worth going to any trouble over.

    As a machine to use as a lathe on a daily basis, there are lots better choices out there.

    PDW

  2. #22
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    Just bumping to see if Uber will come up with more info ;-)

    Bill

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    Haven't found the courage to go look at this thing. Afraid I might drag it home.







  4. #24
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    Go on, drag it home , the wife will love it ;-)

    Pity about that notch in the bead . It could be fixed with a 'gap-bed' type insert (or you could just put a sign near that says " I did not do this" )

    Shame the fixed steady is broken - I wonder if the 'notch' in the bed happened at the same time?

    I am actually surprised not to see a T slot or other mount on the rear of the bed.

    The tail-stock looks better from the back side. The reason for the flat surface becomes obvious when you see the offset adjuster screw.

    Looking closer at those 'half-nuts' , I think my clamp and bar hypothesis seems more likely than a full length lead screw; they do not look like they would open far enough to clear a thread . If you do drag it home, make sure you search the place thoroughly, I'd bet all the parts of that lathe are in that shed somewhere.

    Bill

  5. #25
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    Just been looking again at the pictures...

    Earlier in the thread you said the half-nut mechanism looked home made:

    The picture:

    http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/...pswipok3cb.png

    Shows a hole behind the carriage that might have been the original mounting for the half-nut lever, I suspect you are correct the brass blocks at the front of the carriage are homebrew.

    [edit] Or is it a hole for the bed clamp ??? Intriguing

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    Look what showed up on a local advertisement site.

    screenshot-28-02-17-23-11-31.jpg

    Only one picture and no info.
    I'll try to contact the seller. He lives only 5km away so might go check this thing out.

  7. #27
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    look like its a Wolfcraft. So probably German

    wolfcraft.jpg

    I never got in touch with the seller. But it looks like the buyer is selling again.
    The same lathe is now in the Hague.

  8. #28
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    It sure would be interesting to read what special uses were intended for those lathes, as that extreme tailstock slide implies extreme tapers perhaps? Or is it for something else?

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    Another showed up.
    According to the seller the brand name is TDC

    _861.jpg_860.jpg_859.jpg_858.jpg_857.jpg

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    _856.jpg_85.jpg

  11. #31
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    Wolfcraft - I seem to recall that name associated with cheap 'West German' tools (in the days Germans made things cheap:-))

    Annoyingly , none of the picture answer the 'half nut' question . The red/green one doesn't seem to have the threading option, but the wolfcraft one does have the lever at the left of the carriage (so not home made) and an intriguing second 'carriage' handle on the right .

    Bill

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    Good to see the photobucket pictures are back
    Anyway, my curiosity finally got the better of me. So when another one of these lathes came on sale I bought it.
    I still don't know much more about it. But here is a better picture.



    In an attempt to get more information about this machine I also made a video: YouTube

  13. #33
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    Aha. Well that proves my half-nut theory wrong :-(

    Uber, just watched your video . Thanks :-)

    I cannot believe that lead screw and nut are so open to the swarf - it makes no sense unless there was a cover (now missing) that protected the whole mechanism (maybe sliding under the head-stock - there seems to be a gap and even the tail stock? - there is at least one lathe on Tony's site with such a feature)

    If there is no feed clutch hidden under the headstock , then the 'shifting-gear' is a really poor idea (and would suggest the whole lathe has been made down to a price rather than the quality machine that I first thought it was :-()

    Bill

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    this design looks like something people would come up with trying to avoid any possible patent infringements, but it has one positive feature, when you manually feed the carriage, you are less likely to be hit with anything if something goes wrong, but this has the immediate downside of having to use binoculars to see what you're doing

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    Bill,

    I just checked with a ruler and there is enough room underneath the headstock for a cover plate. Same goes for the tail stock. You might have been wrong about the half-nut but think you're spot-on with the cover plate theory

    Did you see this page: "Wolfcraft" or "TDC" Lathe
    I think the name wolfcraft is wrong. This is why : https://bit.ly/2u9Vp3N

  17. #36
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    jz79, if you look at the 'wolfcraft' picture , there is what appears to be a carriage handle on the right of the carriage (probably just a gear engaging onto the top of the leadscrew (the ml2 myford used a similar mechanism).

    uber, aha yes! you think someone just stuck a label from a drill press onto the gear casing?

    Is there any clutch mechanism under the headstock? or does it really rely on a shifting gear ( it would explain your sheared teeth)

    Yes, Tony asked me for the pictures ( hope you didn't mind?).

    Bill
    Last edited by Billtodd; 03-16-2019 at 07:45 PM.

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    -Yeah. With all those nice metal badges, why would the manufacturer use a sticker for it's own name. Makes no sense.
    -There must be some mechanism underneath the headstock because the gear is clearly moving when I move the handle.
    -The lathe isn't bolted down I'll see if I can make a picture form the underside.
    -I don't mind at all. I "borrowed" those pictures from the local ebay site myself

  19. #38
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    Agreeing with consensus this is more than unique. While foreign in respect to era and features, there were serious considerations in design and patternmaking. As to the over sized base, who doesn't have lathe tooling stored on less convenient horizontal areas? Mounting of motor and drive are within that envelope, so as a unit there is evident logic.
    I'd spent time regenerating this before spending equal time correcting anything chinesium.
    Like 'rocket' lathes, that carriages extend beyond the drip pan. Clearly less than serious considerations of fit and function, basis of humorous degrading label 'lathe shaped object', tickles me no end.

  20. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by partsproduction View Post
    There are many South Bend and other common lathes in displays for a rare lathe to displace. That is, assuming more can be found out about it and it's purpose. As said, it may be the only one, which makes it special in a way.
    I can also see the point of keeping standard or common lathes for their part in making the world what it is today, but rarity means gone is really and totally gone.

    At the very least it deserves careful research before discarding, there is no shortage of scrap cast iron.
    No insult intended, but many treasures lack sparkle. Two comments highlit bold are disparate. Reality to me says research first, until rarity can't make the jump to useful.

    Case in point.
    So my dual apron brake is useless? 48" x 18gauge. Have very little on its origin and zero reference to this size. Funny, what with model number and serialization being very distinct. Patent records steer not in it's direction either. Takes getting used too, but satisfied thus far. And it'll accept finger dies should I desire to make, supplanting the normal full type found with apron brakes. Did I mention acute angles with out stomping 45's into submission?
    formall_1-5-.jpg
    Pic illustrates loadout, counterweights for aprons and back gauge removed.
    Sometimes enjoyment out votes practicality. Machines do not adapt to us, but respond to properly exercised control.

  21. #40
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    Finally someone has found the answer

    PDF stands for Precisische Draaibanken Fabriek (precise lathe factory)
    And apparently they were made on an attic in a dairy factory in Zoetermeer.
    PDF was part of Brinkers and they are still in business

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