Early New Haven Mfg. Co. planer - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Pictures of my mid 1860's New Haven Lathe.
    It is the number 13 lathe in the ad.
    30" swing and 11' centers.
    This lathe was still run by line shaft when I bought it.
    Original paint, steady rest and all of the change gears and face plate and counter shaft and hangers.

    Rob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails new-haven-lathe-mine-1.jpg   new-haven-lathe-mine-2.jpg   new-haven-lathe-mine-3.jpg   new-haven-lathe-mine-4.jpg   new-haven-mfg.-co.-ad-2_li.jpg  


  2. #22
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    More pictures of the lathe.

    Rob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails new-haven-lathe-mine-5.jpg   new-haven-lathe-mine-6.jpg   new-haven-lathe-mine-7.jpg  

  3. #23
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    Thank you for this thread... I don’t wish to sound rude or degrade other posts but I am always craving some good wholesome early machine posts with pictures... they seem to be sparse these days! I guess I should say I’m a little partial to the really early machines!

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  5. #24
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    I’ve always suspected you had a large collection of machines Rob. How many do you actually have? It appears you collect more than use them. Do you have a museum planned? It would be really cool if you made a thread for them all and a little snippet about each of them. We all love to see them

    Nathan

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    Here is the lathe that Rob alluded to. I heard the faint, mournful call on New Year's Eve... "somebody come save me". So I did. Rob immediately identified this as early New Haven or it's predecessor. It's a bit rusted but completely salvageable. It has since been oiled up and looked over pretty good. No markings that I could find. I am hoping the little decoration on the tail stock will ultimately betray it's origin. The carriage is guided by the single V in the front and runs up on top of the flat in the rear. Hopefully we'll uncover some more clues to help pin it down to Scranton & Parshley, early New Haven Manufacturing, or possibly John Parshley after he set out on his own.

    dscn0181.jpg

    dscn0171.jpg

    dscn0172.jpg

    dscn0177.jpg

    dscn0175.jpg

  7. #26
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    and some more pictures

    dscn0179.jpg

    dscn0180.jpg

    dscn0183.jpg

    20191230_151631.jpg

    20191230_151723.jpg

    Rob and Jake: Thanks again for all of the information.

  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Lang View Post
    More pictures of the lathe.

    Rob
    Very interesting. Very nice. That one even has a "non-clutch" clutch relying on treble positioning of a straight and crossed belt to yield forward/neutral/reverse. You're lucky to have that as a real two clutch countershaft would have been a "must ask" even in the 1870s.

    I agree on the 5 pulley planer - the spokes are straight on those 5 pulleys, and that would have been difficult to do before the 1860s - more likely the originals were curved.

    My circa 1855ish "D. Chamberlain - thought" (no-name) planer has three pulleys and a single belt. The pulleys are arranged to drive the bull gear through intermediate gears. Ingeniously, the gears are calculated to yield a "quick reverse," with two different gear set ratios. By examining the gears one can tell which set is forward, other reverse.

    That 4' planer also has a "gib-strip" to keep the platen on the bed shears. I would normally consider this an 1855ish advancement of some note - except the planer is so small.

    The planer was probably rebuilt in the 1890s by McMahon Machinery in Worcester MA. They were advertising themselves in "used & rebuilt machinery" in the 1890s. A brass plate indicates their name. I think at that time they replaced the pulleys with a matched set of three with straight spokes. Another almost identical planer appeared on Craigslist for a short time with "golden calf" legs and curved spoke pulleys which were probably original and both more typical of the 1850s.

    I should re-scan my transparencies. Dern Photobucket... DeSelle of this board has asked. I'm in the mood now.

    Joe in NH

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    I will attempt to post a couple pics of a small New Haven lathe I have ... its been buried in a storage container with several other machines ... I plan on maybe this year pulling them out and getting some better pictures but have just been too busy these last few years to do so. I believe this to be latter... 1880s possibly?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails edd60513-035c-43ba-b57f-3613bb6803c1.jpg   760c1de5-3f8a-4364-a3b8-95d1dd5cd677.jpg   eaf5ca35-f09c-4cc9-af02-881915883967.jpg   c26140b4-062e-468d-b1cd-3844763df754.jpg   1b435c76-90ad-429c-a5c4-65a895ce6246.jpg  


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  11. #29
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    And of course the New Haven Manufacturing lathe at the American Artifacts site.

    early metal lathe

    He calls this first Shepard, Lathe & Co. (which it somewhat resembles) but then corrects himself.




    I once found on Ebay the near identical lathe.




    IIRC this one had some damage to a leg, but I've repaired worse. The seller was anxious to sell, had entertained no offers, but a caveat was the lathe had to be removed from the basement WITHIN ONE WEEK OF CLOSE OF THE AUCTION. I could not arrange the neighbor's truck and trailer to make this happen to match the timing so I had to let it pass.

    So they are out there. Persistence and timing wins the pursuit.

    Joe in NH
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails s-l1603.jpg   s-l1602.jpg   ay251h.jpg   ay251c.jpg  

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  13. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeSelle View Post
    I’ve always suspected you had a large collection of machines Rob. How many do you actually have? It appears you collect more than use them. Do you have a museum planned? It would be really cool if you made a thread for them all and a little snippet about each of them. We all love to see them

    Nathan
    I have lost count, maybe 100.
    Most are in storage. I have about 12 that I have running and use.
    I was planning on some sort of a museum, but I don't think that will happen.
    A thread about each machine could happen in the future.
    I need to get the machines in a permanent location so I can take pictures of each.
    I did sell three of my old machines.
    An early 3.5' Hendey planer, a bench hand planer and my early Boynton bench hand shaper.
    I then bought an early Sibley & Ware drill, an early Blaisdell drill and a nice 28" H. Bickford drill.
    I picked up the Bickford in Cincinnati. It had never left the city where it was made.
    Still in its original paint. It was used in a maintenance shop and never got much use. Probably made around 1883.

    Rob

  14. #31
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    Some more early New Haven lathe pictures similar to esbutler's, but a little newer.
    These are not mine.



    I forgot to mention that the last three pictures were provided by Maltesehunter.

    Rob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails new-haven-lathe-25.jpg   new-haven-lathe-26.jpg   new-haven-mfg.-co.-1860s-15.jpg   new-haven-mfg.-co.-1860s-16.jpg   new-haven-mfg.-co.-1860s-17.jpg  

    Last edited by Robert Lang; 02-18-2020 at 04:25 PM.

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  16. #32
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    A picture of the green New Haven lathe that joe posted above.

    Rob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails new-haven-lathe-10.jpg  

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  18. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by esbutler View Post
    Hopefully we'll uncover some more clues to help pin it down to Scranton & Parshley, early New Haven Manufacturing, or possibly John Parshley after he set out on his own.


    dscn0175.jpg
    The more I look at that little decoration on the tail stock, the more it says John Parshley.

    Rob

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    I took a screen shot of an auction for an envelope from the New Haven Co. a while back.
    _20200218_020231.jpg

  20. #35
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    Some more early New Haven lathe pictures similar to esbutler's, but a little newer.
    These are not mine.
    Pix 3 and 4 are of the NHMC lathe at the American Precision Museum. I remember this one when it was in Ed Battison's barn. He spoke on the "bolted" headstock which he said was a "hold-over" from NHMC production when they had wooden beds. And, IIRC, he had one of those TOO.

    Pix 5 appears to be a NHMC lathe at the Ford "Armington & Sims" machine shop.

    Joe in NH

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe in NH View Post
    Pix 3 and 4 are of the NHMC lathe at the American Precision Museum. I remember this one when it was in Ed Battison's barn. He spoke on the "bolted" headstock which he said was a "hold-over" from NHMC production when they had wooden beds. And, IIRC, he had one of those TOO.

    Pix 5 appears to be a NHMC lathe at the Ford "Armington & Sims" machine shop.

    Joe in NH
    FYI, Pictures 3 and 4 are of the New Haven lathe located at the Springfield Armory. Picture 5 is a lathe at the East Broad Top RR machine shop. Jake

  22. #37
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    FYI, Pictures 3 and 4 are of the New Haven lathe located at the Springfield Armory. Picture 5 is a lathe at the East Broad Top RR machine shop. Jake
    Thank you for both of those. Ed Battison DID cut a wide swath in machine tool acquisition in New England.

    I have not been to either Springfield OR East Broad Top. I will add them to my "bucket list."

    I wonder where the wooden bed lathe ended up? It may be with Franklin Museum. It was one of Ed's "prized" acquisitions. (Along with Brown & Sharpe Universal Mill No. 7 - which at last report was "missing.")

    Joe in NH

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    Joe,

    What is the "Franklin Museum"?

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    Quote Originally Posted by sandiapaul View Post
    Joe,

    What is the "Franklin Museum"?
    Sorry. Recently re-named.

    Ed Battison having been elevated to "Director Emeritus" of the Precision Museum was not pleased with the direction of the entity which he himself created. He decided to start again with "The Franklin Museum of Nature and the Human Spirit," named for the colonial whom Ed felt the nearest intellectual kinship. Ed styled this museum similarly to the APM except for this second go-around he decided to follow a "wider scope of human ingenuity." A daunting task at best.

    Ed was only partially successful in the time remaining in his life. I myself (professional engineer) helped him with stabilizing and putting foundations under the barn like building (Former Lamson-Goodnow woodshop) on his Windsor, VT property.

    After Ed's passing, three of his closest friends locally made it their mission to try to continue Ed's work, beginning with Ed's remaining collection of ephemera. Ed's Memorial Service, which I attended, kind of launched this effort.

    shows the Memorial Service tent set up in front of Ed's Lamson-Goodnow Woodshop. (Dern Photobucket - only some of you will be able to see through the blur. Try clicking the link https://i281.photobucket.com/albums/...H/100_0412.jpg)

    The closest friends were/are challenged to present ANOTHER museum within (literally) walking distance of the APM (who for years have had their own issues), and only recently I see they have updated the Franklin Museum website and re-named it the "Battison Museum."

    I can't comment too much beyond what I have related as while I KNEW Ed, we were not that close. Not like the three. Others I have referred to the Franklin Museum for information have had mixed review of their interaction. This I guess I understand. Ed's interests were SO wide, and so well founded on his research/collecting, it might be easy for someone not near as savvy to be taken advantage of. Plus there is the challenge of ANY MUSEUM maintaining a favorable public persona and profitability. They can't give away Ed's store.

    Museumship is a hard line of work to be in for sure.

    Edwin Battison

    Hope this helps.

    Joe in NH

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  26. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by cncFireman View Post
    I took a screen shot of an auction for an envelope from the New Haven Co. a while back.
    _20200218_020231.jpg
    Very interesting.
    That is the same lathe in the 1855 ad.

    Rob


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