Early New Haven Mfg. Co. planer - Page 4
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  1. #61
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    I have that Smith ad from 1856 too.
    That is the one I was referring to in post #1.
    It also shows up in an 1877 ad and an 1872 edition book with a section on iron working machinery.
    I think once printers had these, they then used them in other ads.
    You can see this in the McLagon and Smith ads.

    Rob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails new-haven-mfg.-lathe-1877-1b.jpg   wood-light-co.-1872-9.jpg   mclagon-stevens-co.-1863.jpg   smith-henry-1863.jpg  

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  3. #62
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    This was in the 1849 Scientific American about the 1849 American Institute Fair in New York.
    Also the award they won.

    Rob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails scranton-parshley-1849-1-2-_li.jpg   scranton-parshley-1849-fair-award-1c_li.jpg  
    Last edited by Robert Lang; 02-22-2020 at 04:33 PM. Reason: added award

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  5. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Lang View Post
    In 1847 David has Soloman Johnson as a partner.


    Rob
    This is a correction from post #1.
    In 1847 William T. Scranton, David's son, has Soloman Johnson as a partner, not David Scranton.
    In 1843 David has Larman Abbott as a partner.

    Rob

  6. #64
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    Here is John Parshley in the 1850 census.
    You can see his wife, a maid, three daughters, his son and three apprentices living with him.

    The apprentices are;
    J. S. Rees(census spelling).
    S. H. Barnum.
    D. Ely.

    Here they are in 1852;
    James S. Reese.
    Starr H. Barnum.
    Douglass Ely.

    Rob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails parshley-john-record-1850-1c.jpg   14d-reese-james-1852.jpg   14b-barnum-starr-1852.jpg   14c-ely-douglas-1852.jpg  

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  8. #65
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    Here are two interesting people who worked for New Haven Mfg.

    Chester VanHorn as superintendent in 1854.
    VanHorn patents.

    1855.
    Patent Images

    1856.
    Patent Images


    Andrew Y. Parmele as assistant superintendent from 1872 to around 1892.
    From Parmele & Mix and later Parmele, Mix & Co. of New Haven.

    Rob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 15l-vanhorn-chester-1854.jpg   36-parmele-1872.jpg  

  9. #66
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    Chester VanHorn of course did the "partially openside planer" at the APM.



    There is one other of the VanHorn planer which IIRC was in South America.

    Sort of like the 60" Putnam Lathe on Ebay which is in Guatemala, but can be bought for a dollar.

    VanHorn also pioneered a "elevating" tool support which I think Lester Bowman has on one of his Springfield DL Harris Lathe. Unfortunately the pix of all this are not showing.

    Joe in NH

  10. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe in NH View Post
    VanHorn also pioneered a "elevating" tool support

    Joe in NH
    1855 patent in post #65.
    Some Steptoe, McFarlan lathes had this and one of my early lathes has this.

    Harris planer with VanHorn patent. VanHorn is visible on the support arm.

    Rob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails harris-1867.jpg   steptoe-lathe-10.jpg   steptoe-lathe-11.jpg   steptoe-mcfarlan-co.-lathe-5-2-.jpg  

  11. #68
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    There is a VanHorn planer on display at NMIH museum in Bethlehem PA. It is owned by the Smithsonian.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails vanhorn-planer.jpg  

  12. #69
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    Van Horn from 1856.

    Rob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails springfield-1856-1b.jpg   springfield-tool-co.-1856-2b.jpg  

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  14. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Lang View Post
    Time for some John Parshley info.
    I have not been able to find a lot on John Parshley.
    He was born in Connecticut. What year I don't know.
    At some point he went to Massachusetts. His wife is from Massachusetts and his first three children(all girls I think) were born in Massachusetts.
    His fourth child, John Parshley Jr. was born in Connecticut.
    John Parshley died in late 1856. I don't know from what. Sadly John Jr. died in 1857 of typhoid fever.

    Rob
    A correction on John Parshley's death.

    I figured John died in late 1856 because I could not find him in any of the city directories after 1856 and because of the 1856 through 1858 ads for the sale of his estate.
    Well I found his grave in Florida. He died in 1888.

    John Howard Parshley (1813-1888) - Find A Grave Memorial

    Looks like he had eight children and four of them died very very young.
    Now to do some more research to see what he was doing after 1856.

    Rob

    Looks like John had 12 children and 5 died very very young.
    Last edited by Robert Lang; 03-03-2020 at 12:32 AM. Reason: added children

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  16. #71
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    John Parshley in the 1860 census.
    He is living in Urbana Ohio.

    Rob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails parshley-john-record-1860-1b.jpg   parshley-john-record-1860-2b.jpg  

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    I found some new info on John Parshley.
    He died on August 8, 1868 in Live Oak, Suwannee County, Florida.
    I relied on the Find A Grave site, which has a poor picture of the grave.
    They put the date as 1888. It is hard to make out if it is a 6 or an 8. I came across another site that said 1868.
    This explains why I could not find John Parshley in the 1870 and 1880 census. I found him in 1840, 1850 and 1860.

    I don't have any new info on his time in Urbana Ohio. He was a machinist there.

    After the civil war, he went down to Live Oak, Suwannee County, Florida to live.
    He is quite famous down there. He was a founder of the town.
    He laid out all the streets there and named them after his family and places in Ohio.

    Links to some articles on him and his wife Nancy.

    Remembering Suwannee: County election drama in the 1850s | Opinion | suwanneedemocrat.com

    Remembering Suwannee: A look at Nancy Parshley’s will | Opinion | suwanneedemocrat.com

    Also pictures of John and Nancy Parshley.

    From a newspaper article.
    "In 1865, John Parshley, a native of Urbana, Ohio, built a sawmill and planing mill near the rail junction and laid out the town, naming the streets after members of his family, Ohio names, and those of railroad executives. Within a short time, Live Oak was an established milltown with several small stores, houses, a blacksmith shop, a school, boarding house and post office.

    Live Oak officially became the seat of Suwannee County in 1868, even though the town was not yet incorporated. John Parshley, the town's founder died in the same year, as did the live oak which had given the settlement its name."

    Rob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails john-parshley-1b.jpg   nancy-parshley.jpg  

  18. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Lang View Post
    I don't have any new info on his time in Urbana Ohio. He was a machinist there.

    Rob
    John Parshley in Urbana Ohio in 1858.
    Building steam engines.
    Ad from Scientific American.
    I came across a reference that he may have been associated with D. & T.M. Gwynne of Urbana Ohio, who built steam engines.
    D. is David Gwynne and T. is Thomas M. Gwynne.

    Rob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails parshley-1858.jpg  

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