Early Planer converted to Mill on vintage machinery site.
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  1. #1
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    Default Early Planer converted to Mill on vintage machinery site.

    I'm mentally not pulling up the name but from a Connecticut Manufacturer.

    Metal planer mill - US $1,995.00 (Rocky Mount, VA) | VintageMachinery.org

    The "oval" where a name might normally be found may be painted over, or simply removed.
    I'm thinking New Haven Manufacturing or their predecessor Scranton & Parshley.



    Joe in NH

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    I’ve seen a few of the planer / vertical mill conversions. What I’ve seen only one of is apparently a planer converted to a surface grinder. It’s in the Starrett museum in Athol. Grinding wheel has to be at least two feet diameter and six inches wide, IIRC. It was used to grind the blades for the early combination squares. Next time you’re down that way, take a look. Always an interesting visit, as I’m sure you know.

    John

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    Possibly a L.E. Osborn & Son planer as was brought up a while back. They were also a New Haven builder. This one looks later as it has much less ornamentation to the design.
    Scroll down this thread below.
    American machinist early machinery article

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    Leonard Brothers, New York

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    I like that retractable way cover mechanism. I wonder if that's original or someone else's bright idea?

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    I've seen that way cover laid out in a book.

    Which is not to say a previous owner was not the one who sent that tip in to American Machinist Magazine. 😆

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    Joe is not far off.
    It is a Parmele, Mix & Co., New Haven planer from about the late 1870's, almost 1880.
    It is not the original Parmele, Mix & Co.
    Originally it was Parmele & Mix. Andrew Y. Parmele (1819-1897) and William B. Mix (1827-1885). They started about 1852.
    In 1855 they became Parmele, Mix & Co., with George B. Woodruff coming in as a partner.
    Sometime between 1858 and 1860 they ceased operation.
    Andrew Parmele went to work for New Haven Mfg. Co. in 1872 as an assistant superintendent and stayed there until he retired around 1892.

    This new Parmele, Mix & Co. was a Joint Stock Company owned by New Haven Mfg. Co. and was shut down around 1880.
    A Parmele, Mix & Co. planer from an 1880 sellers catalog.

    Rob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails osborn-1880-1-2-.jpg   parmelee-mix-co.-1880-1.jpg   parmelee-mix-co.-1880-2.jpg   parmelee-mix-co.-1880-3.jpg   parmelee-mix-co.-1880-4.jpg  


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    jd-summerlee-thudson.jpg

    Here's a different spin on an old planer. Converted to a vertical borer, with the aid of an old lathe headstock. On display at Summerlee Museum of Industrial Life, Scotland.

    Not for precision work! It was used for turning dished ends for boilers at Thomas Hudson's Sheepford boiler works.


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