Ejumacate Me on Pulleys, Please?! - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Yep. As far as I know Logan never scraped anything, it was all ground.

    So a flaked Logan has clearly had some "ebay help".

    Now, if it is a good scraping job, that could be different and might be very good. But a spotty arrangement of "Nike swoop" flake marks, that's more typical of ebay.... goes with blue porch paint, and overspray on the floor in the pictures.....

  2. #42
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    My Logan 14" had no evidence of scraping and I was the first to be deep into it. No derision about Logan tools here, a well designed and made tool. No pretence towards being :"ultimate" but good value for money.

    I do regret getting rid of it but it was too big for the space, redundant in a number of ways and it was stalling progress on the shop. Headstock bearings were possibly shot but might've been OK... at least a bunch of it went to another 14" owner so it wasn't all scrapped.

  3. #43
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    The only Logan machine tool I've ever owned is a 7" shaper. And it's beautifully scraped. I always thought it was original - no?


  4. #44
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    Yeh...

    I'm not aware that Logan ever flaked any of their ways. It is quite ironic to consider the hard life this machine lead - in a military training center - juxtaposed with the flaking of its ways. Kinda like putting a fresh coat of wax on yur demo derby car.

  5. #45
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    Nov 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedlineMan View Post
    Yes;

    Humerous. Not everyone's idea of a worthy machine, or one for anyone to get excited about. Regardless of anyone's opinion of a Logan, they are indeed capable of doing plenty of good work. If I were a machine snob, I might be disgusted with myself even. However, the machine is far more capable than I, so it is easy for me to keep myself well grounded, and to enjoy slumming in the lower echelons. Other than the intrinsic value that a top flight machine offers, which I most definitely can appreciate, the practical difference is moot. Hopefully we will make a good team, the old Logan and I.
    RedlineMan

    Sorry I wasn't trying to disparage your Logan lathe. I only found it humerus that someone would compare a lathe bed to pasta.

    As for your lathe I grew up in a shop where we had a Logan, South Bend, Elgin and the unmentionable "A". They ALL turned out good work within their class and my Dads favorite was his Logan.

  6. #46
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    No;

    Not at all. In fact you made a factual correction!

    I understood the original analogy perfectly, and it does indeed have some application. I further understand there are different classes of lathes, and that they are capable of different levels of efficiency and precision. What I don't understand is the tendency in some (not anyone in particular) to look down their nose at something that is considered "lesser" by them. If a machine operates within its intended design parameters, and does so efficiently, there is no cause for that type of attitude. Although I may only envy the latter his machine, I would be immeasurably more impressed by a man that could turn out high quality work on an Atlas than on a Hardinge.

    In such cases as it is simply an attempt at humor badly rendered, exceptions can be made. If machinists were poets... well... they'd get less machining done!

  7. Likes Dociron, Billyum liked this post

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