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    Default Electric motor voltage

    I have an old Emerson electric motor, the voltage is 104 V . I was trying to figure out the year of the motor. Does anyone know when we used a voltage of 104v?

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    Sounds like the voltage you would get between two legs of 115V three phase.

    allan

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob-J-H View Post
    I have an old Emerson electric motor, the voltage is 104 V . I was trying to figure out the year of the motor. Does anyone know when we used a voltage of 104v?
    What are the other markings on the plate? That might be the minimum operating voltage.. I know on larger motors I use to work with could use plus or minus 10% on the voltage but they were 440 volt.. Ramsay 1

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    A photograph would help date the motor. It could be 1890's to early 1900's.

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    I have an 1898 Emerson Catalog, and many motors are listed for 104V.

    Give us some more specs on the motor, and if it's in the catalog, I can scan the relevant page(s).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob-J-H View Post
    I have an old Emerson electric motor, the voltage is 104 V . I was trying to figure out the year of the motor. Does anyone know when we used a voltage of 104v?
    Suspiciously exactly half of the classical 208 VAC Wye, leg-to-leg, BUT NOT the same source's any-leg to Neutral Voltage.

    Data plate fotos?

    What size, and off WHAT device?

    Could it have been a form of switched multi-speed or Variac-controlled gadget?

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    I have an old Century 1-1/2 HP repulsion start induction run motor also marked 104 volts. It is on a pedestal grinder that I run just about everyday. Never had any trouble running it on 120 VAC. Probably don't run it much more than 15 minutes at a whack, but it has never gotten hot. I think mine was built between 1910 and 1918 according to the catalogs I have. Mine is wired with the windings in parallel but can be changed around in series for 208 volts. Most of them were like that. You could get that between the center tap and high leg of the old delta grounded B phase set up. That might be what the makers were aiming at with this voltage.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Shublom View Post
    I have an old Century 1-1/2 HP repulsion start induction run motor also marked 104 volts. It is on a pedestal grinder that I run just about everyday. Never had any trouble running it on 120 VAC. Probably don't run it much more than 15 minutes at a whack, but it has never gotten hot. I think mine was built between 1910 and 1918 according to the catalogs I have. Mine is wired with the windings in parallel but can be changed around in series for 208 volts. Most of them were like that. You could get that between the center tap and high leg of the old delta grounded B phase set up. That might be what the makers were aiming at with this voltage.
    That all makes eminent sense, Sam.

    "Downsides?"

    I'd expect that these motors were built very forgiving of the extra (nominal) 6/12 Volts, but are LESS forgiving where 110/220 has become - as mine is 123/246.

    Worse? Unless fully rewound, and even IF ONLY re-varnished and baked, the OEM winding insulation in-touch with the Copper is a hundred years or more old.

    And still counting.

    Clean it up. Run it 'till it dies. Odds are actually on its side that won't be right away, but be prepared to replace it.

    It dasn't owe ANYBODY a damned thing by this age, and has not for the better part of 75 years already.

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    Y connected 3 phase with 104V to ground would be 180V phase to phase. Never saw such a scheme. The 208/120 is three 120V windings Y connected. If you want to run it near it’s plate voltage get a 120 to 12 volt control transformer and connect it in a bucking scheme to get 108. The transformer 12v secondary must withstand the motor current.+- 10 percent is within spec for AC motors.

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    Alright I will try to post some pics. Wish me luck.emerson-motor-013.jpgemerson-motor-011.jpgemerson-motor-010.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob-J-H View Post
    Alright I will try to post some pics. Wish me luck.emerson-motor-013.jpgemerson-motor-011.jpgemerson-motor-010.jpg
    If there was a "Dead Poet's Society", there must be a "Fossil Motors Society" too?

    Otherwise, you might want to look at proper anchors:

    Small Boat Anchoring - BoatUS Magazine

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    The plate reads Emerson alternating current motor, 104 volts, 50 cycle,intermitent duty, 1/2 HP. Speed 1450, 1 phase. It starts running in 2 parts. First the outside windings start spinning, when that gets up to speed, the shaft starts spinning. The plug was wood with a plunger. First you plugged it in, then you pushed in the plunger to tighten up the prongs. You had to pull out the plunger to make it release. Hope this makes sense.

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    Anchor my ass. This thing is going to fund my retirement LOL.

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    How about a photo of the nameplate?

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    Half of 208V? Possible, I suppose.

    Also similar to "utilization voltage"..... Like 230V for a 240V nominal supply... allows for various voltage drops.

    Nice old motor. Bit of a museum piece. What's this about outer windings and so forth? That does not sound quite right. I do not see the stuff that would do that.

    Given what it is, you may be seeing the action of a brush-shorting system. The motor would start with the commutator active, and then it would be shorted after it gets going.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob-J-H View Post
    Anchor my ass. This thing is going to fund my retirement LOL.
    Don't we WISH!

    Can I interest you in some spare parts for a Honeywell 6? How about an ISS-80 frame or an 8" floppy drive?

    The 2A3 triodes I had been hoarding didn't ever go all that scarce nor valuable.


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    Note the "Intermittent Duty" part ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post

    The 2A3 triodes I had been hoarding didn't ever go all that scarce nor valuable.

    Yes but the Western Electric version, the WE 300B, has done all right. I have one of the Lees Summit tubes that I got from Gateway Electronics for $2.50. One of the only two times I got ahead of Stu Bartfeld on a deal.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 9100 View Post
    Yes but the Western Electric version, the WE 300B, has done all right. I have one of the Lees Summit tubes that I got from Gateway Electronics for $2.50. One of the only two times I got ahead of Stu Bartfeld on a deal.
    Mine were run in classical "Class A", not AB1, push-pull. 1938 Sparks-Whitington "waterfall" front maple-veneered console all-band the Retired Treasurer of one of the speciality "crucible" process makers of high-alloy steels the Pittsburgh area once had so many of had gifted the neighbour kid who did his gardening in exchange for a few bucks - and access to his extensive personal library!

    Before he twigged to how fast I read, I'd done the lot, then on into the whole of Blue and Red Lodge and this-or-that "Rite" freemasonry ritual! Last, of course. Not easy reading, stand-alone. But there was nothing else LEFT!

    No more confusing than comparative religions, eerily similar to Joseph Smith's "borrowings", even..but still.. considerably more puzzling to a young kid than nuclear physics, or even his VERY warm-blooded twin grand-daughters!


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    Old motors are not that valuable, although the auctioneers can often get much more for them as "decor" than they actually go for to a standard collector.

    Quote Originally Posted by 9100 View Post
    Yes but the Western Electric version, the WE 300B, has done all right. I have one of the Lees Summit tubes that I got from Gateway Electronics for $2.50. One of the only two times I got ahead of Stu Bartfeld on a deal.
    LOL.... Yeah, he was pretty sharp when it came to pricing. I first went there when he was still on Delmar next to the fried chicken joint.Got a good deal of useful things after he moved to Page. I might have gotten a super deal once.


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