Finally found me an 18 speed 16X54 Hendey - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 40 of 40
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    99
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    60
    Likes (Received)
    11

    Default

    looks like a nice piece of gear enjoy it!!

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Alabama
    Posts
    400
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    452
    Likes (Received)
    126

    Default

    Wow I'm jealous, that thing is mint!

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Yadkinville, NC
    Posts
    200
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I've been working on cleaning out the apron this week. Aside from some sludge in the bottom it wasn't that bad although apparently that has not always been the case. At one point a good amount of swarf must have found its way inside. How I'm not sure as the apron is fairly well enclosed. A couple of gears had a few dings from chips getting mashed in the teeth although nothing very serious. Worst was the bronze clutch gears, the inner tapers were all dinged up. Goes to show even older machines that have seen very light use can still have some issues!

    Carriage feed clutch was so bad someone had removed the clutch adjusting ring entirely to get it to finally grab and hold. After picking out a few embedded steel chips the bronze gear was chucked in my other lathe. I used yellow label TIMESAVER fine lapping compound to smooth out all the dings and dents. I went just far enough to get full contact with the mating steel cone. A replacement adjusting ring was turned using the remaining one as a pattern.

    20210630_175250.jpg20210630_175153.jpg20210626_173606.jpg

    The little apron pump was disassembled and cleaned up. I found no issues with it and for such a small pump it puts out a pretty good stream of way oil!

    20210630_192314.jpg

    A new sight glass window was installed before the apron halves were reassembled. I use a smear of non hardening Permatex aviation gasket sealer on the joint.

    One thing I noticed with some degree of disappointment is that the rack pinion disconnect has been discontinued on this lathe. Not that it's missing but the apron front is an entirely different casting and has no provisions for this useful feature.

    Next task is to clean the saddle/cross slide/compound assemblies.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Yadkinville, NC
    Posts
    200
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Backside of the apron all buttoned up.

    20210703_200711.jpg

    The saddle is all cleaned up, look at all that beautiful scraping! I was lucky in that the numerous long oil passages were not plugged up.

    20210703_105910.jpg 20210703_105917.jpg

  5. Likes rpseguin, HendeySwede, Greg Menke liked this post
  6. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    347
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    97
    Likes (Received)
    172

    Default

    Wow, that’s amazing to still have flaking in that location. You think it’s original or was it possibly rebuilt at some point?

  7. Likes ClappedOutBport liked this post
  8. #26
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Yadkinville, NC
    Posts
    200
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jwearing View Post
    Wow, that’s amazing to still have flaking in that location. You think it’s original or was it possibly rebuilt at some point?
    I see no signs the lathe has ever done serious work so believe all scraping to be original. It looks nearly identical to the scraping that was on my Hendey #2 General Purpose lathe of similar vintage. Underside of the cross slide. Top is flaked for decoration and compound swivel faces are nicely scraped as well.
    20210712_182436.jpg

    Besides adding needle thrust bearings to the cross slide screw I added them to the compound screw. Cross slide screw was a direct fit but the compound needed a slight modification. I couldn't find needle or ball thrust washers to fit a .750 shaft yet fit in a 1.125 bore, they were all for a 1.250 bore. After some careful setup and indicating the original c'bore is opened up slightly. For the gear side of the screw I measure the assembled thrust bearing and cut a pocket to give .002 clearance between gear face and compound casting. Oiled assembled the compound screw turns very smoothly.

    20210716_191214.jpg20210717_094348.jpg20210717_094342.jpg

    The finished compound, there is less than .001 backlash in the screw. Considering the mechanism uses a pair of straight cut spur gears I think that's pretty impressive. Them folks at Hendey sure did a great job making a top quality lathe.
    20210717_170146.jpg

  9. #27
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Yadkinville, NC
    Posts
    200
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    A nice extra feature the 18 speed lathes featured over the 12 speed models was the quick withdraw cross slide. It lets one quickly withdraw the cutter back to clear the work, then return forwards to start the next cut after carriage has been moved into position. Here are the innards to the cam operated mechanism.
    20210717_170138.jpg

    This particular lathe was ordered with a direct reading cross slide dial. That's a lot of hash marks even for such a large dial!

    20210717_170211.jpg

  10. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Alabama
    Posts
    400
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    452
    Likes (Received)
    126

    Default

    Damn you really won the lathe lottery, eh!

    That thing is in incredible shape.

  11. Likes dundeeshopnut liked this post
  12. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    Quebec
    Posts
    300
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    497
    Likes (Received)
    186

    Default

    Agree! Talk about a horseshoe up the ar**.

  13. Likes Kjelle liked this post
  14. #30
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Yadkinville, NC
    Posts
    200
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Working on the way wipers this week. I doubt this is 100% correct as I had no documentation to go by, just the remnants of the old wipers. There is a flat spring with each end slit making four fingers. Two of the fingers work on a rubber wiper, other two on a vee shaped backing strip. Both the main cover and backing strip have a vee shaped shoulder in them. I cut a strip of felt 1/8 x 1/8 and fit it into each of the shoulders. The backing plate I placed with the felt against the carriage face. This multi piece sandwich is a bit tricky to hold together but does appear to work well. For the rubber wiper I cut rectangles from 3/16 shore 60 neoprene and made a template to cut the notch, this is how all four of the originals were made.

    16x54-way-wiper-assy.jpg

    Getting near the end of this project - literally - tailstock gets cleaned up next.

  15. Likes ClappedOutBport liked this post
  16. #31
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Reddington, N.J., U.S.A.
    Posts
    3,679
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    728
    Likes (Received)
    466

    Default

    Nice score!
    Would this be the Hendey that was at auction where you could see in the images that it was already disconnected from power? Was interested, but lacked the space for it. If you don't mind, what did rigging cost you?

  17. #32
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Yadkinville, NC
    Posts
    200
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by reggie_obe View Post
    Nice score!
    Would this be the Hendey that was at auction where you could see in the images that it was already disconnected from power? Was interested, but lacked the space for it. If you don't mind, what did rigging cost you?
    It was from the USMA West Point auction. Rigging was $1000 and non negotiable.

  18. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Reddington, N.J., U.S.A.
    Posts
    3,679
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    728
    Likes (Received)
    466

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Peroni View Post
    It was from the USMA West Point auction. Rigging was $1000 and non negotiable.
    What did they do to earn $1000?

  19. #34
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Yadkinville, NC
    Posts
    200
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by reggie_obe View Post
    What did they do to earn $1000?
    They built a nice skid for it and didn't break anything but IMO it was a $400 job tops. But they were the only rigger onsite in a secured facility so they could charge whatever they wanted. Only option was to pay up or not partake in the sale.

  20. #35
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Yadkinville, NC
    Posts
    200
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Here is the tailstock clamping mechanism all cleaned up. That is a left hand thread on end of the binding shaft. A dog point set screw in the head of that shaft fits into the holes in short clamp. Turning the shaft to engage one hole or another changes where the clamp handle begins to tighten up. It's a pretty simple and clever design that is quite effective and does not throw off tailstock alignment when clamped.

    tailstock-clamp.jpg

    There's not much left to the tailstock. I'm not removing the whole thing at this time, just cleaning out the workings. I was rather surprised that there is no thrust bearing in the end cap. My Hendey tool and gage lathe has a nice Torrington ball thrust bearing which makes for very smooth operation. It's pretty simple to add one as there is plenty of room in the end cap. One is on order and will be here next week. Also down the road I do plan to fit way wipers to both ends of the tailstock.

  21. #36
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Yadkinville, NC
    Posts
    200
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    The thrust bearing arrived this week and I finished boring out the cap for it. Used and INA 2903 which while a metric size fits this application perfectly and was also readily available at an excellent price.
    20210730_185042.jpg

    The tailstock action is very smooth now. The quill is not hardened and there is no tang slot so the morse taper was a little buggered up from spinning drills. I have a nos 4MT reamer from the USSR and used that to very slightly cut the taper oversize and clean up the rough surface. My Yukiwa "Super Dream Chuck" approves of the new taper and seats tightly.
    20210730_191746.jpg

  22. Likes dundeeshopnut, HendeySwede liked this post
  23. #37
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Yadkinville, NC
    Posts
    200
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I ended up making a change to the cross slide thrust bearing. Had used a needle thrust bearing in there but after using the lathe a bit just did not like the "feel." I found that a bit odd as I put the same style bearing in my Tool & Gage Hendey and love how smooth it is.

    Switched up to a ball style thrust bearing but it wasn't as straight forward as the needle type. Went with a 51103 bearing which is a metric size. The OD fit perfect in the connecting bar but the ID is too big for the shaft. The new bearing is also a fair bit longer. Fortunately Hendey had pressed on a steel thrust block on the screw that is pretty thick. What I did was put the screw in a 4 jaw and turn a shoulder back equal to width of the bearing, and a close slip fit to the shaft side race's ID. That took care of the inner bearing.

    Outer bearing took a little more work in the way of extra parts. My lathe had a big nylock nut on end of the cross slide screw holding everything together. With the wider bearing there would no longer be room for it plus I'm not a big fan of them anyways. What I did was make a pair of 1/4 wide locking rings. I also too the original keyed thrust washer and faced it down to 3/32 wide. To make up the difference from the 5/8 screw and 17mm race ID I made a thin sleeve to press in the race.

    Here it is all assembled, the action is now silky smooth.
    thrust-washer.jpg thrust-washer-assy.jpg

  24. Likes dundeeshopnut liked this post
  25. #38
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Yadkinville, NC
    Posts
    200
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Still chipping away at a few things here. I was quite surprised to find out that this machine suffered a crash and some broken parts at some point. What is odd is that accident happened at far right end of the bed. The thread dial smacked into the inner steel retainer of the leadscrew bearing and left a pretty good dent in it. Of course the thread dial got broken as did one ear of the main clutch lever fork and the front right hand way wiper case. Pretty minor damage I think compared to other stuff I've seen.

    Well someone very talented with a brazing torch fixed the clutch lever fork and thread dial. To the point that until I knocked some paint off whilst cleaning up these parts one would never guess that they had ever been broken in the first place. Real first class repair job. Now the person who repaired the way cover..... Let's just say that it did get stuck back together and it did fit back in place but that's it.

    I sent a message of to Hendeyman and he was able to supply me with the print for this part as well as the wiper assembly detail drawings. I had a nice piece of G2 DuraBar on the stock rack so one evening last week I whittled out a replacement CHLF237-0-3 (C16-5430) Wiper Case. DuraBar is beautiful stuff to work with and I think the new wiper case turned out very nice.

    way-cover-1.jpg

    Here are all the parts that make up the wiper assembly. There is a neoprene strip, a steel scraper, flat spring and a 1/8x1/8 hard felt strip. I did things a little different than the assembly drawing shows. I turned the scraper around so the step faced the step milled into the cover. In this little cavity I placed the felt strip. I left the neoprene strip between carriage and scraper. Eventually I will remake the scrapers from brass as I don't like the idea of steel riding on the ways even if they are induction hardened. I machine a fair bit of cast iron and I think the felt will do a good job at helping to keep the bulk of the CI dust from fouling the scraper and rubber wiper. It's cheap and easy to replace bi-yearly

    way-cover-2.jpg

  26. Likes dundeeshopnut liked this post
  27. #39
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    Quebec
    Posts
    300
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    497
    Likes (Received)
    186

    Default

    Nice work! although I am curious as to why the original brazed way cover doesn't work. [Mine are just brass vees sandwiching felt behind them.]

  28. #40
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Yadkinville, NC
    Posts
    200
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    [QUOTE=dundeeshopnut;3801243]Nice work! although I am curious as to why the original brazed way cover doesn't work.

    It was ugly and poorly repaired. Also while it did fit it did not fit well - gap on one side of the vee and rubbing on the other. Not very appropriate for such a first class lathe in otherwise excellent shape. The new cover has less than 2hrs into it, fits nicely, looks the part and will better protect the ways and saddle.

  29. Likes dundeeshopnut liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •