Flat belt pulley rim style
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  1. #1
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    Default Flat belt pulley rim style

    I was flipping through an older engineering handbook and noticed this illustration of belt pulley rim types. Achieving a crown with either a radius or two facets coming to a point in the middle is common. Has any of you seen one like the one on the right - tapered on one half, flat on the other? What is the purpose of this configuration?

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    Just the ticket for fast and loose configurations. All belt changes from one direction.

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    I dunno much,but I do know a flat belt will run off a pulley on the cylindrical side.I bought a machine from the Australian Army once where the flat belt ran off the pulley in a couple of revolutions......the dummies didnt know it had to be crowned ,and couldnt fix it.......Ive got an old drill press with a flat belt right angle drive,and if the drill bit jams,the belt just falls down the vertical pulley,stopped by a flange........automatic torque limiter.....soon as the belt starts to run again ,its tight.......Those guys knew a thing or two.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CalG View Post
    Just the ticket for fast and loose configurations. All belt changes from one direction.
    The adjacent fast and loose pulleys usually had the same diameter so there wasn't a ramp up on one side, at least until later counter shafts such as this Brown and Sharpe. The loose pulley (farthest to the right) was smaller than the fast pulley and had a short ramp of the side to walk the belt up onto the larger drive pulley. Both pulleys have crowns to keep the belt in place once shifted. Seems like a nice feature to take the tension off the belt and pulley when not doing any work.

    dscn0036.jpg


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