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  1. #21
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    Jon,for tonnage required for punching mild steel multiply the length of the periphery of the hole by the thickness in inches,multiply by twenty five and the answer is tons.
    e.g. 1/2" dia x 0.125" thick
    =0.5 x pi x 0.125 x 25 = tons
    or
    1/2" square x 0.125" thick
    =0.5 + 0.5 + 0.5 + 0.5 x 0.125 x 25 = tons
    Apologies if you already knew that.For bending tonnages Amada used to have a nice chart with formulae for bending sheet on their website.Should not be hard to find.
    http://www.amada.com/products/toolin...g/rgABCtoc.htm
    Mark.

  2. #22
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    Ron Reil, if I'm not mistaken, has a website with a detailed page for fly-press work. Hot work, he's one hell of a blacksmith.

    Wish I could remember the URL.

  3. #23
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    Found it:

    Ron Reil

    Interesting fellow, check out the rest of his site.

  4. #24
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    One of my jobs as an apprentice was to make a large set of punches and dies (with holders for both) for the workshop flypress - this was so we could punch shim stock nicely. I remember the flypress seemed a little shakey for alignment, no doubt due to its age, so don't expect to get die-set type alignment on these old clunkers.

    Quite useful for some short stroke work, but no substitute for a good long stroke hydraulic press for general workshop stuff.

    Another type of human-powered press is the kick press (Maybe they have another name?) - we still use one for pressing extended pins into transmission chain. The beauty of these is you have both hands free (to get caught somewhere ), and your foot (plus a swinging weight) does the work. Made by Heine and no doubt others.

  5. #25
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    I think they still have all kinds of good use in them. I have just bought this one for planned blacksmithing use (also for my girlfriend who likes smithing but has trouble using heavy hammers and getting enough energy into the workpiece, also you get more control so you can use it as a blacksmith's magician). I'ts an A frame press since they are far more common around here then C frame presses but it will get the job done.

    I have noticed that this machine is rated roughly around 15 to 20 tons, but it doesn't come close to my 12 tons hydraulic press.
    On the other hand with the hydraulic press you get less control and it's slower to operate.

    I'll give it some work later this week, some minor repairs and maintenance, a good cleaning and a new paintjob

    press.jpg


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