FS: Cincinnati No. 2 Milling Machine (early 1900's) - 350$ - DFW Area, Texas, UAS - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    I also have a Cincinnati ball-joint style horizontal, a No. 3 Plain. I have the heavy vertical head for it and now have the correct universal dividing head. If anyone has the drive train for driving the spiral dividing head in sync with the table, whether on a plain or universal mill, I would like to get some pictures, etc. All of the illustrations are typically from the other side of the machine. I will have to make up the bracket(s) and gearing before I can do any helical work unless a set miraculously becomes available.

    Interestingly, I also have a 15 inch Potter & Johnston shaper as seen in John's picture.

  2. #22
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    If anyone has the drive train for driving the spiral dividing head in sync with the table, whether on a plain or universal mill, I would like to get some pictures
    There is a thread where I was helping someone with photos of the "end" gearing and "bracket" - maybe it will turn up

    Thumbnail shows the "bracket"

    This is typical of the "open style", but not necessarily perfect for 1903

    Found the old thread

    WTB Dividing head drive setup for Cincinnati 2Ml
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails p1000729-gears.jpg  

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  4. #23
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    Is this mill still available?

  5. #24
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    Here one can find the catalogs for the years 1896, 1903, 1904, 1907, and 1919

    When I get a little more ancient , I'll have to ask them if they would like to have my '13 and '23 (which appears to be a near duplicate of the '19)

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    When I get a little more ancient , I'll have to ask them if they would like to have my '13 and '23 (which appears to be a near duplicate of the '19)

    Outstanding!

    In post #22 johnoder shows an end gearing bracket.
    Here are some screen grabs from the 1904 and 1919 catalogs. Note the difference in the brackets. 1919 has the slot end open as in post #22. The 1919 catalog views show the end gearing as attached to a Universal Mill. Should be the same table as the Plain Mill.
    Interesting to see how much the millers grew in size by 1919.
    1904-2-uni.jpg1904-3-uni-spiral-head.jpg1919-3-uni.jpg1919-2-3-plain.jpg1919-3-uni-right-side.jpg
    John

  7. #26
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    These are remarkable pictures of the single ram mills. The first pic shows nearly the type universal dividing head that I own. I think it is Cincinnati because it has 5 C taper. It is sorta rare to see.
    Somebody needs to grab that mill.

  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by alum100k View Post
    These are remarkable pictures of the single ram mills. The first pic shows nearly the type universal dividing head that I own. I think it is Cincinnati because it has 5 C taper. It is sorta rare to see.
    Somebody needs to grab that mill.

    I'd imagine CMM never built anything milling machine related with a 5C taper?

    Here are the 1923 scans - when they got done with the B&S taper, they went to NMTB 50 (or 40) similar to what K&T did early on
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dh01.jpg   dh02.jpg   dh03.jpg   dh04.jpg   dh05.jpg  


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  10. #28
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    Thanks more than I will say. My head is very similar in design to the Cincinnati but it definitely is 5C. I made the draw tube for the collets and back plate for a chuck to match the threaded spindle.

  11. #29
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    Here are some screen shots of the Cincinnati dividing head from 1896 thru 1907. No mention of 5C work holding collets sold.
    The 1896 description for this head states that the dividing head will accept the same size arbor as the miller it is matched with.
    Typical sizes would be 9, 10, 11, and 12 B&S tapers for the spindle plus 7, 9, 10, 11, and 12 for accessories.
    Perhaps a photo of your dividing head?
    same-arbor-machine-spindle-1896.jpgdividing-head-rest-tailstock-1907.jpgdividing-head-1907.jpgdividing-head-section-view-1907.jpg
    John1-half-universal-1904.jpg

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  13. #30
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    First to back. I've never posted a picture but I'm getting close. Certain things need be seen. I appreciate all your pictures (even though I've been reading you for years) directly related to the universal dividing head. It comes that your pictures are astounding in that they can be magnified to such definition. We can see the type of head and read their account. It does indeed flip completely over. The oil ports become underneath but that is okay for short use. I did some mod on mine so it was driven from the left side, facing the mill. That's the way Hendey did it, opposite Brown & Sharpe. But most of this fits together except exposed miter gears and some way, tapered for 5C.
    The way this went; I was at a huge 3 day auction, now that I think about it, I rented a motel room. I bought so many milling wheels that ... another story. There were vises being auctioned at fast pace and there were three different auctions going at the same time. It was hot and it was going and looking at a different areas of this huge place. Most of the dividing heads had chucks and a few, didn't. I stuck my finger into the spindle bore and thought "no way" but I went for it. They called it the other "unknown" . There were shills there, bidding everyone up and laughing about it. However, in retrospect, those Kurt vises were a deal when the "Bridgeport" vises were going for serious money. It was that time in between.
    So I was bidding against a shill and he clapped out near $60. I liked it, even though it didn't have a chuck. It was nasty looking. Oh yes, re Cincinnati, It has one large plate of many divisions ( it is 40:1) and the other side has the rest of them.

  14. #31
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    johnoder has posted some really great info. Easy to read and informative posts are always a go to for good reading

    Images or text contained in an Adobe Reader pdf can usually be enlarged without distortion. Use the "Edit" and "Take a Snapshot" tool to select the image or some part thereof. Image #4 in post #10 on page one was a collection of enlarged "snapshots" reassembled using Microsoft Paint. This image was sourced from multiple pages. Here it is again along with Cincinnati's big #5 mill that looks early modern in 1919. Sorta off topic but here is a little more dividing head related.
    1903-cincinnati-gear-box.jpg5-plain-mill-1919.jpgaccuracy-1.jpgaccuracy-2-.jpgaccuracy-3.jpg
    John
    Well the dividing head data pages I posted seemed familiar cause johnoder put them up first.
    Like NY, NY so good say it twice so here see it twice
    Last edited by jhruska; 02-04-2020 at 11:59 AM.

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  16. #32
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    My post #27

    Does the "stand out" catch your attention? First four are '23 - plain borders

    Fifth is '13 - with its "frilly" border

    It helps us here a hundred years along that CMM made these catalogs a generous 8 1/2 X 11" - on nice quality paper

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  18. #33
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    It came to re- looking at post #27. Page 96 of CMM catalog shows the "High Number Indexing Attachment". This consists of three double sided plates A-B, C-D, E-F. The O.D. is 8 13/16". The bore is 1.5" doc of screws 1.875".

  19. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by alum100k View Post
    It came to re- looking at post #27. Page 96 of CMM catalog shows the "High Number Indexing Attachment". This consists of three double sided plates A-B, C-D, E-F. The O.D. is 8 13/16". The bore is 1.5" doc of screws 1.875".

    A little better of the High Number plates

    dh05crop.jpg

  20. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    My post #27

    Does the "stand out" catch your attention? First four are '23 - plain borders

    Fifth is '13 - with its "frilly" border

    It helps us here a hundred years along that CMM made these catalogs a generous 8 1/2 X 11" - on nice quality paper
    The paper may be old enough to be acid free and will not degrade.
    Not a fan of the frilly border. The 'stand out' directs the view to the content although I do like the scroll work at the top of the pages
    in post 23 image 2&3. My friends dad was head of the drafting department at Republic Steel. The drawings were a work of art.

    By the way, there is a really nice horizontal mill for sale

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  22. #36
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    Right. One needs to have the actual Cincinnati Milling machine and the heavier indexing head. Direct indexing of irregular steps. I'll post this itself.

  23. #37
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    That's a project I would love to take on... If you still have the machine in a couple of weeks, I will be in the metroplex and I could drive over to take a look.


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