FS on Craigslist MeyER Camelback dill
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  1. #1
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    Default FS on Craigslist Myers Camelback dill

    Not mine, NO affiliation to owner.

    No,it doesn't appear to be all original.
    In the Wilkes-Barre Pa. area.

    Rare Myers Machine Co. Machinist Drill Press - farm & garden - by owner - sale
    Last edited by reggie_obe; 09-24-2019 at 03:34 PM.

  2. #2
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    Not so rare. Yet another of those "sensitive drills" which predominated at the end of the line-shaft era. And for certain makers, were morphed into electric motor adaptations as they competed with later more common V-belt driven shop drill presses in the 1930s.

    This one an electric motor adaptation by an owner.

    They can be "retrograded." Dolly wheels work very nicely on the right angle belt drive, and a cone pulley from a South Bend lathe can be the speed change, both available for reasonable money from Ebay. Probably worth more if it is retrograded - although what is it worth to a market not equipped with line shaft and countershaft to drive it?

    The last one of these I got FREE from a Craigslist seller in Newton, NH. It was in his basement and he listed on Craigslist first at $200 for an "Antique Drill Press", then $100 for "Old but reliable drill press", and then $50 for "Old Drill Press in a basement."

    At $50 I ventured forth with a "I'll take a look at it" - and found a HG Barr version (possibly the originator of this design) which had been converted to electric motor similar to this. "Oh it works good - we've done a bunch of drilling, my father and I." 8 steps separated it from the back of my truck.

    I thought I might use it for parts for a Washburn Shops/Excelsior pattern sensitive drill which it resembles - but I turned it down when I measured and realized that parts are 105 percent larger on the Barr Drill.

    "I think I'll pass on this" I said.

    "Would you take it for free but get it out of here now - I'll help you."

    How can I resist, especially when the owner offers to help?

    It may end up as yard-art. Wife would be a friend for life if I made more room for her plants.

    Call it "Local Color."

    Joe in NH

  3. #3
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    As Joe mentioned, H.G. Barr of Worcester, Ma. is the origin of the Myers drill.
    Myers Machine Tool Company Columbia, Pa.
    U.S. Machine Cincinnati, Ohio
    Mechanics Machine Co. Rockford, Il
    The Dwight Slate Machine Co. Hartford, Conn
    and The Washburn Shops of Worcester, Ma
    sold near copies of H.G.Barr's drill.
    Barr took The Washburn Shops to court as they had copied his design.
    By 1913 Barr closed his company and sold all assets at auction including rights and patents.
    The drill could be found for sale thru MMM and Niles Bement Pond.
    Described in a War Department manual 1941.

    1905-h-g-barr-worcester-ma.jpgh-g-barr-5-1907.jpgh-g-barr-7-1910.jpgh-g-barr-auction-1913.jpgwar-department-1941-.jpg
    John

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  5. #4
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    Looks like it has a sliding head and both the head/table slide on dovetails. I acquired a similar style drill a couple months ago and have found the sliding head to be extremely handy. Now that I have it I couldn't imagine life without it.

  6. #5
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    Usual for these (see pix) is to have a "swivel" square table that can be tilted, or swiveled back and forth to locate work under the quill. The tilt usually uses a "pin" to locate perpendicular position. This table frequently has a "side bolting" position so work can be located in a side mounted vice or clamps. THIS is the table which usually wears the "arc of shame" by those not careful and drilling through and into the table.

    A second lower table does not swivel, can be seen either round or square, or possibly be substituted with a "cone" or "mandrel" for certain specialized operations. This table cannot be swiveled hence does not usually show the "arc of shame" - but can be missing as its only held in place by a clamp.

    Some forgo the swivel table for a single full height dovetail upon which is mounted the quill stand-off and the table stand-off. A tilt feature may be built into this single table version?

    There are a variety of drive systems adopted, usually based around a "right angle flat belt drive." Some have no tensioner, counting on stretch of the belt. Others have a tensioner built into the right angle pulleys. Others have the tensioner built into the lower step pulley mount.

    Yet others (Francis Reed) have right angle pulleys and a drive pulley with "two steps" such that the number of speed changes are doubled depending upon where one locates the right angle belt.

    Joe in NH

  7. #6
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    00c0c_4hn2cgf9r5t_1200x900.jpg00w0w_gub3vnoavus_1200x900.jpg00c0c_4hn2cgf9r5t_1200x900.jpg
    Rare Myers Machine Co. Machinist Drill Press
    Rare Myers machine company drill press. See all the pictures. Best offer. Location is 18702 N. East PAdd.jpg


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