Gallmeyer & Livingston no15 Grinder
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  1. #1
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    Default Gallmeyer & Livingston no15 Grinder

    I just picked up this little Gallmeyer and Livingston no15 grinder. I stumbled on it and of course brought it home. Pretty neat little thing. Big name plate.
    serial number 15230 puts it around 1939 - 1940 I think based on some very limited documents I got from Leland Gifford.



    Overall its in pretty decent shape.



    Spindle is tight, runs smooth. Drip oiler on top for the spindle. I guess its babbit. Not sure how to tell if there is too little or too much oil in the bearings.



    Has the original Allis Chalmers 3 phase motor, neat old frame. Beast of a motor.



    The mag chuck is in decent shape, It holds really well in most spots but there are a few weak spots though. It cleaned up pretty good.



    Nice machinery dealer tag still on it.



    The table and knee operate very smoothly. I don't have any abrasive wheels for it gotta get something on order tomorrow to try her out. Takes 3inch ID wheels up to 10 inch diameter. Missing the spanner so I'll need to make one up. I can't find any info on this thing. Leland Gifford said they don't have a manual for it, but they did send me a few prints they had from the build card for its serial number.
    So if anyone has a manual, I'd be interested, or any info on this little grinder would be helpful.

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    Nice looking grinder.

    10 x 1 x 3" - Aluminum Oxide (WA) / 46H Type 1 - Surface Grinding Wheel | Exact Tool & Supply

    Might find a wheel at a local shop store so to save shipping..

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    Thanks Johnoder !
    I did look through each publication there, saw nothing for a no15.
    maybe I missed it, I will take another look.

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    Thanks for the tip michiganbuck!

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    You should make a spark stop shield to go at the end of the go direction.
    Don't overtighten back rail screws, two-finger tight is plenty. (clean out threads and get new full length back rail screws)
    Get a 6 or 8" true flat hone for the chuck.
    Pick and rag wipe clean, not spray can cleaning.
    See that under ways are wet with oil and rust-free.
    Don't worry about grinding the chuck right away. (let me know when you are about to do that)
    Add two or three drops of oil to the motor bearing front and back. (not car engine oil, clean caps before removing)
    Don't wire brush hand wheel numbers but flat sandpaper clean them after careful flat file the bugs.(320 GT)
    ( you want to just get down to original hand wheel surface, not take stock.)
    Many of those old castings are full of filler and so scraping bare makes more work. Sand and fill a small place at a time can be a better way to restore. Good to wear a dust mask and get rid of sanded paint.
    Last edited by michiganbuck; 12-24-2020 at 06:25 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    You should make a spark stop shield to go at the end of the go direction.
    Don't overtighten back rail screws, two-finger tight is plenty. (clean out threads and get new full length back rail screws)
    Get a 6 or 8" true flat hone for the chuck.
    Pick and rag wipe clean, not spray can cleaning.
    See that under ways are wet with oil and rust-free.
    Don't worry about grinding the chuck right away. (let me know when you are about to do that)
    Add two or three drops of oil to the motor bearing front and back. (not car engine oil, clean caps before removing)
    Don't wire brush hand wheel numbers but falt sandpaper clean them after careful flat file the bugs.(320 GT)
    ( you want to just get down to original hand wheel surface , not take stock.)
    Many of those old castings are full of filler and so scraping bare makes more work. Sand and fill a small place at a time can be a better way to restore. Good to wear a dust mask and get rid of sanded paint.
    Do you mean a guard at the left end of table? For when you will (eventually) have that OH SHIT moment and lose a part or two?

    I've seen those broken before.... might be a good idea to make something somewhat flexible or pliable, or padded.... (not sure if that's a good idea, just a thought...)

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    [Me]You should make a spark stop shield to go at the end of the go direction.
    (Mike)Do you mean a guard at the left end of the table?

    I was thinking about sparks mostly but to stop the flying tilt vise could be included.
    A best shield might be 14" high, as wide as the table, being 4" past the table length, backstop sloping downward at 15* to direct sparks dow into the 4" gap to drop into a bucket.

    Surface grinders not having any shield should have Go direction pointed to a safe way so people walking past don't get nailed. Uncontrolled sparks go all over the shop.

    A good trick to avoid flying set up is to come to questionable part height on the grind-side. Ofen you can bump a high place with a safe grind, rather than a catch to part with climbing and throwing a part.
    A fair set-up can stand with a three-finger push test to the go and feed direction..

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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    [Me]You should make a spark stop shield to go at the end of the go direction.
    (Mike)Do you mean a guard at the left end of the table?

    I was thinking about sparks mostly but to stop the flying tilt vise could be included.
    A best shield might be 14" high, as wide as the table, being 4" past the table length, backstop sloping downward at 15* to direct sparks dow into the 4" gap to drop into a bucket.

    Surface grinders not having any shield should have Go direction pointed to a safe way so people walking past don't get nailed. Uncontrolled sparks go all over the shop.

    A good trick to avoid flying set up is to come to questionable part height on the grind-side. Ofen you can bump a high place with a safe grind, rather than a catch to part with climbing and throwing a part.
    A fair set-up can stand with a three-finger push test to the go and feed direction..
    Definitively always feed the table against the rotation of wheel! Same thing with dressing, keep the diamond off to left of center in case an oops, it pushes away instead of sucking into wheel.

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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    You should make a spark stop shield to go at the end of the go direction.
    Don't overtighten back rail screws, two-finger tight is plenty. (clean out threads and get new full length back rail screws)
    Get a 6 or 8" true flat hone for the chuck.
    Pick and rag wipe clean, not spray can cleaning.
    See that under ways are wet with oil and rust-free.
    Don't worry about grinding the chuck right away. (let me know when you are about to do that)
    Add two or three drops of oil to the motor bearing front and back. (not car engine oil, clean caps before removing)
    Don't wire brush hand wheel numbers but flat sandpaper clean them after careful flat file the bugs.(320 GT)
    ( you want to just get down to original hand wheel surface, not take stock.)
    Many of those old castings are full of filler and so scraping bare makes more work. Sand and fill a small place at a time can be a better way to restore. Good to wear a dust mask and get rid of sanded paint.
    Michiganbuck, I don't quite understand your comment/concern about the back rail screws. Can you explain? and are these the screws your talking about? on the back of the chuck?


    Also I did clean up the hand wheel graduations with dry steel wool. They are legible, but will need some work. Interesting brass marker stick. I just love the old school generous use of materials.

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    I assumed this old grinder had babbitt spindle bearings because it has a drip oiler on top of the head. Well I was wrong. I got this line drawing from leland-gifford that clearly shows spindle ball bearings. Love these hand drawings. Anyway, looks like the oiler drips into a "well" formed by the bottom of the head casting, that connects to both bearings. One spindle bearing makes a racket, sounds like a saw. So, I will dig into it and likely replace the bearings.


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    Q:[Michiganbuck, I don't quite understand your comment/concern about the back rail screws. Can you explain? and are these the screws you're talking about? on the back of the chuck?]

    Yes, good that G&L put thumb screws there, that is all you need.
    So many guys crank those screws hard and pull the threads.

    Good to make an over lip back rail so you can skim it with the back of the wheel having a dressed dish.

    G&L a world high-class machine.

    I have made a back rail with using a petting wheel to part a piece of angle iron.

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    Neat looking grinder.

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    Q? From a machine design architecture point of view,
    does a surface grinder with a knee inherently have
    a problem with dust/grit wearing out the knee dovetail ways ? ? ?

    -Doozer

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doozer View Post
    Q? From a machine design architecture point of view,
    does a surface grinder with a knee inherently have
    a problem with dust/grit wearing out the knee dovetail ways ? ? ?
    Doozer I think so. This machine has two interlocking covers to protect the ways from the dust and grit. Likely it was a problem with this type of design. I'm not sure if they are factory covers, but if I had to guess they are.

  18. #16
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    Your post got me thinking about my No. 15 JK. Cleaned it up and repainted it about 15 years ago. Took the wet kit off it at that time and never put it back on. Did so and wired the coolant pump in over the last couple of weekends- will be fun to try. Shop made wet kit, not factory, but someone put a lot of effort into it.

    Finally found some factory cut sheets on it last night. PM me your email address and I'll send scans.

    Cheers, JMc
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_5588.jpg   img_5589.jpg   img_5590.jpg   img_5591.jpg  


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