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  1. #621
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    Asquith, re the photo of the bottle mch. is the chair for the person counting production ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    Sylvesters or Sylvests as we called them , that's a blast from the past. I'd not heard that term for 40 years. Regards Tyrone.
    Got one of these Sylvesters, still use it from time to time , I suppose the modern equivalent is a Yale "Pul-lift". We have a few other mining artifacts partly because we're based on part of the Ashton Moss (Snipe) Colliery site . The colliery was linked underground to Bradford pit about 4 miles away. A now deceased friend used to take the underground train from Bradford to Ashton Moss , every week or so, to check out the mine firefighting pumps etc. Coal winding finished at Ashton Moss in 1959 and the steam winders were replaced by an electric winder for taking supplies to Bradford , that was disused by about 1966 and the colliery demolished.
    We have a small electric "Pikrose" haulage winch, made a few hundred yards away at the Delta ironworks in Audenshaw. No doubt Asquith can provide details of this once large engineering firm?
    Rob

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    Default Armstrong Whitworth at Openshaw

    Somewhere in this topic , Asquith has mentioned Armstrong Whitworth at Openshaw.
    My grandmother left school during the 1st world war and had to go to do munitions work, she would be 15 or 16 years old. There was a choice of either Crossleys engine works or Armstrong Whitworth's , she chose the latter and was taken to that part of the works concerned with making gun barrels for the Royal Navy. She said she thought she was in Hell! Sparks,fire & smoke, not a place for a young woman. Anyway, she was shown how to work the overhead electric traveling cranes and that was her job for the duration of the war. The crane cab was accessed by ladders and the controls were rather like tramcar handles. After some months she was working the crane but every so often, she was getting electric shocks through her feet. A maintenance electrician was called and the problem was traced to frayed cables in the floor of the cab and the electricity was passing through the nails in grandma's clogs. Repairs were put in hand and in due course, that maintenance electrician married the young crane driver and thus became my grandfather. He passed away in 1948 , by which time A-W had become English Steel.
    Rob

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    Default Pomona

    Asquith, fascinating thread - I spent most of the last couple of nights trawling through it. Although my knowledge of engineering is slim, gained mostly from my dad who was apprenticed at Renold not too long after WW2. I still have a small lathe (mothballed) that he obtained from them in an asset clear-out. Honest, it was a sale not a nick!

    Way back when in #118 you mentioned Pomona Docks and in your inimitable style pointed out that it being previously called Pomona Gardens got you no closer. Well, Pomona is/was the Roman goddess of plenty. Back in the 70s the Manchester Eagle Motor(cycle) Club did a group booking on a Co-op Travel Tours trip down the Manchester Ship Canal that set sail from those docks. I still have the pamphlet somewhere & I vividly recall preferring the Manchester end to that of Liverpool (bias? the novelty wearing off as a child? who knows). Amongst other things, it was said then that Pomona was particularly associated with either the grapefruit or the pineapple and that that dock generally specialised in incoming fruit. I forget which of those two fruits. Obviously, the garden preceded it - but pineapples were a great status symbol in times long gone by, hence the numerous pineapple motifs to be found in stone on or adjacent to old houses. Perhaps the gardens' speciality was these? Or perhaps they were just plentiful.

    My own particular interest at the moment is the two Churchill companies, Machine Tool and Charles. I've cobbled up an entry on Wikipedia for them if anyone is interested. The constraints of their rules (esp. verifiability, neutral point of view, no "original research" - a particular bugbear of mine - and copyright) prevent me from adding much more to the story, although I'm open to both questions and possible additions. I might try tarting up the Galloway entry there next, as it is woefully lacking and this thread has inspired me! About time I put my bedraggled history qualifications to some use.

    If anyone in the Manky area has a copy of either of the Churchill companies' self-published histories, or if you yourself could possibly reveal more regarding that self-published book you refer to that so far has not made it to the web and in which the take-over gets a pasting, then I'd be very appreciative. I'd even buy you a pint in the Protection. Just one, mind!

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    Robh, Sitush,

    Welcome to the forum, and thank you for your most welcome contributions. Robh’s recollections and anecdotes put flesh on the bones of this rambling industrial history. As a child, one of our neighbours, a diminutive and very determined woman, worked as a crane driver at Irlam Steelworks during WW2. Apparently she never failed to turn up for work in a spotless white blouse. She, too, married a steelworks electrician, Archibald Hunter, originally from Stirling, a regular and welcome visitor to our household, bringing great mirth with his hilarious tales of everyday life.

    As for Pikrose, I had seen some of their winches, but hadn’t realised they were based in Manchester. They seem to be still in business, in diminished form.

    Sitush,

    Thanks for the clarification regarding Pomona. Tropical fruit and Manchester go together like peaches and ….. gravy.

    So far I’ve only had time for a quick look at your Wikipedia entry for Churchill’s, and am highly impressed. A very thorough and interesting piece of work. I will be able to give you some information on Churchill Machine Tools’ demise, taken from Curtis Sparkes’ Famous for a Century, but I’m afraid it will have to wait a week or so.

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    [QUOTE=Asquith;1497278]Robh, Sitush,



    As for Pikrose, I had seen some of their winches, but hadn’t realised they were based in Manchester. They seem to be still in business, in diminished form.

    Me again,
    The "Pikrose" logo was the emblem of Audenshaw Urban District Council, whose first chairman was Austin Hopkinson MP, he owned the Delta Ironworks and was a well loved local benefactor. The Pikrose name came from the emblem, being a vertical miner's coal pick and the red & white Lancashire & Yorkshire Roses- this was cast into all Pikrose products and may still be, the company is based in Oldham now. Besides haulages of all sizes, they produced many other mining products including rolling stock and railway systems.
    Another locally made winch can briefly be seen here:
    YouTube - Slipping Maria

    The works plate on this steam winch reads "Saxon Bros Openshaw,Manchester." Presumably this was something to do with George Saxon, the mill engine builders also of Openshaw? If not, who were Saxon Brothers? This winch was recovered from a mill in Royton ,Oldham where it was used to hoist cotton bales up the outside of the mill where they were man-handled through loading doors at each floor level. After many years use under steam it is now worked by a modern diesel powered air compressor, being much more convenient than the 2hours or so to raise steam in the Robey vertical boiler ( the feedpump for which is another local product, made in Gorton,Manchester). Finally the boat shown in the video was built at Marple, Stockport in 1854 and has been rebuilt , maintained and kept local to Manchester ever since.
    Rob.

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    Should say the boiler feed pump mentioned above is a Frank Pearn, West Gorton, Manchester.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sitush View Post
    My own particular interest at the moment is the two Churchill companies, Machine Tool and Charles. I've cobbled up an entry on Wikipedia for them if anyone is interested.
    Sitush,

    Excellent Wikipedia entry on Churchill, I hope you continue with your entries, and let us know about anything new. I am sure there are many here who enjoy reading anything like this.

    Churchill Machine Tool Company - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Great to have posts from new forum members Sitush and RobH, and everyone else who keeps this interesting thread going

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    Cheers Pete S, and Asquith before you. It is a work in progress but I have one or two other targets immediately in my sights, and then who knows. Whatever its merits, it wouldn't be half what it is had been written by someone with an Oxford history degree ... which I say as a Cambridge man

    If anyone does have any more info on the Churchill companies then I would be most grateful BUT it has to be "verifiable" in print otherwise wikipedia lawyers will jump on it, much as canteen lawyers jumped on stuff in years gone by: sometimes they're right, sometimes they ain't but either way you'll never shift 'em.

    I'd be particularly interested if anyone can explain a company called Churchill-Milne(s). I know of Henry Milnes, the Bradford lathemaker, but cannot make a connection to him or anyone else regarding this company. Same applies to Newcast Foundry and, to a lesser extent, Charles Churchill (Bedford) Ltd (which I think may be Denhams after a move from Halifax).

    Anyway, and regardless of all the above, I truly have been fascinated with this thread and it has brought back many memories of things my dad talked about when I were a lad. Hopefully the references in the Churchill item might give some people cause to research more generally around things like American Machinist and Page's Weekly, both of which are fascinating and many of whose editions are available for free on the netty. A pun there, for any Geordie readers

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    Sitush - I've sent you a PM.

    Rob,

    I'm curious about the Saxon Bros, Openshaw, winch. I looked at the 1911 Slater's Manchester directory, and it includes Saxon Bros, Machinery Agents, Examiner Buildings, Strutt Street. It may be that your winch is badge engineered.

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    I was going to continue with the Mather & Platt theme, but since the subject of Churchill Machine Tools has cropped up, I’ll briefly continue in that vein, and reintroduce Edward Wood & Co Ltd of ‘Manchester, London and Buenos Aires’.

    Charles Churchill opened his works in Pendleton in 1904. The structural steelwork was supplied by Edward Wood & Co's Ocean Iron Works at the southern end of Ordsall Lane, handy for Salford Docks and Buenos Aires. The works was located 300 yards south of the old Ordsall Hall. The Hall is a remarkable survivor. The site of the works is now occupied by grass and trees.

    The photos are from a catalogue of unknown date, but probably c.1920.


    Churchill’s Pendleton works under construction. I know it’s not a very interesting photo, but note the tall ladder. A bit of a handful.


    This is one of the template shops (known as a moulding loft in shipyard parlance). Here thin wooden templates would have been made to allow the shop floor to cut the steel and punch or drill the holes.


    Order Dept.


    Estimating and Sales Dept.

    The offices, at least, appear to offer a pleasant working environment. The factory was built on a green field site in an area of Salford that was undeveloped until the arrival of the Manchester Ship Canal. A welcome change from the old, squalid, crowded industrial areas of Salford and Manchester. The Ordsall Lane area itself deteriorated, but it’s moving up again now.

    Some more boring photographs. To me, part of the appeal of Manchester lies in the fact that there are still old industrial remnants right in the heart of the city.


    One gatepost bears the inscription Edward Wood Ocean Iron Works. However, the adjacent post has a plate which says Edward Wood Red Bank Works. Red Bank has been mentioned in earlier posts, and is just the sort of place a prospering firm would want to get away from. The only potentially relevant information I came across was in an 1883 directory which referred to the Lancashire Ventilating Company (Tobin’s patent), Red Bank Works, Manager Edward Wood.

    Behind the gates were two warehouse loading bays, one of which had an iron warehouse crane fixed to the wall, and this also bore the name Edward Wood Red Bank Works.

    The reason I was in this backwater is that I was looking for the location of Richard Roberts’ Globe Works. Roberts deserves to be better known, for he was one of the most influential mechanical engineers of the 19th century. Had he possessed the commercial flair and cunning of eminent Manchester contemporaries like Nasmyth, Fairbairn and Whitworth, he would doubtless have achieved fame and fortune. They owed more to Roberts than they cared to admit.

    Pictures of Roberts’ 1817 lathe can be found here:-

    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...-lathe-114230/

    Roberts’ Globe Works was in production from 1821 to 1852, although Roberts remained on the premises as a consultant until 1858. An advertisement for the 1852 sale of the works’ contents is transcribed in Richard Hills’ book Life and Inventions of Richard Roberts 1789 - 1864. Work had been transferred to the larger Atlas Works, owned by Roberts and his partners, the Sharps (Sharp, Roberts).

    Roberts’ Globe Works was situated on the corner of Dickinson Street and Faulkner Street, and on a short arm of the Rochdale Canal. A very extensive network of canals served central Manchester, ideal for delivering coal and raw materials and shipping finished products. The 1849 map shows that Globe Works was bounded on the east side by the canal branch, with another canal branch on the west side (separated from Globe Works by Dickinson Street and some narrow buildings). In fact the immediate area was well-penetrated by canals, and numerous cotton mills, saw mills, foundries and coal yards in this crowded area were served by these canals. Despite this, the area would never have been mistaken for Venice.

    The branch canal can be seen in this 1901 photo:-

    http://images.manchester.gov.uk/web/....php?irn=67848

    Globe Works would have been at the far end, on the left. In the photo, on the left is Dickinson Street Power Station, with the slightly later Bloom Street Power Station on the right. Dickinson Street was the city’s first central power station. I’ll say more about these stations later, but Bloom Street was one of the earliest and longest-serving CHP (Combined Heat & Power) stations. It opened in 1901 and started to supply steam to adjacent building for heating in 1911, and continued to do so until 1989. This is probably why the building has survived to this day, and is now a ‘listed building’.

    Bloom Street power station can be seen here in post #41:-

    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...69/index3.html

    Some would say that I have many candidates for the Most Boring Photo award, but the next one surely heads the list:-


    Let me explain. All traces of Roberts’ Globe Works have gone. The adjacent canal arm has been filled in (no doubt some defective components were discretely dropped in there by Roberts’ employees, to be found by future archaeologists). A car park has replaced the canal branch. I took the photo to show the line of the canal bank (on the opposite side to Globe Works), and also to show survivors of steam heating pipes from Bloom St.

    Going back to this photo:-



    Looking from Harter Street: The bland 1960s building (Linley House) stands on the site of Globe Works and the later Dickinson Street Power Station. The building, and Bloom Street Power Station are tucked away behind the imposing St James’ Building on busy Oxford Road.

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    In the previous post I mentioned Manchester’s first central power station at Dickinson Street. It was planned and overseen by the brilliant John Hopkinson who has been featured several times in this thread, most recently in connection with the Central & South London underground electric railway.

    Hopkinson had introduced the three-wire system in the UK, and with Dickinson Street he introduced the five wire system. This economised on copper conductors, and offered consumers a choice of four voltages - 100, 200, 300 and 400 volts. For a given power, low voltage meant high current - Ferranti’s 10,000 volt AC system, with transformers close to consumers hadn’t convinced everyone yet!

    Hopkinson was associated with Mather & Platt, and from their nearby Salford Iron Works they supplied much of the electrical equipment. This included two of the main dynamos (two others coming from the Electric Construction Co), four ‘transformers’ (not the simple ones we associated with alternating current, but motor-generator sets for changing the voltage), switchboards, and various motors, and early examples of electric cranes. The four 400 HP vertical steam engines were also locally-made - by Galloways. Galloways also supplied six boilers. There were also six smaller dynamos driven by Hornsby engines.

    In 1899 major disruption ensued when the leather link belt on No. 10 engine failed. The flailing belt took out the engine’s governor, and the now-unloaded engine went into overspeed. The flywheel burst and fragments flew around the engine room and out through roof and windows. Two other engines suffered consequential damage to their flywheels. Based on the engine numbers, these were probably the smaller engines.

    The station opened in 1893, but soon had to be enlarged. The smaller sets were removed and the space used for two Musgrave (Bolton) engines each driving a 1500 kW dynamo (one by Siemens of London, one by ECC of Wolverhampton.

    By 1906 the main plant comprised:-
    Two 1800 kW Parsons turbine generators
    Two 1500 kW Musgrave - Siemens/ECC (reciprocating engines)
    Two 750 kW Ferranti/Westinghouse (reciprocating engines)
    Four Galloways/ECC (reciprocating engines)

    From 1911, low pressure steam was bled off the Parsons turbines for district heating purposes.

    In the 1920s, generation was wound down and it became a sub-station (with rotating convertors rather than AC transformers, as the supply was still DC).

    Bloom Street power station started with four Musgrave reciprocating engines driving 1800 kW British Westinghouse DC generators. A 10 MW turbine generator was introduced in 1917 to supply AC power. Steam was tapped off this for district heating.

    Most of the above information is taken from Electricity in Manchester by Roy Frost (published 1993 by Neil Richardson, ISBN 1 85216 075 6).

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    Going back to this photo showing Dickinson Street and Bloom Street power stations on the left and right respectively:-

    http://images.manchester.gov.uk/web/....php?irn=67848

    Immediately behind the photographer was the Eagle Foundry. I’ll return to this shortly.

    The 1849 map (Alan Godfrey Maps - Manchester Sheet 33) shows the Eagle Foundry, and another - Waterloo Foundry - which was on the land now occupied by Bloom Street.

    It’s invariably worth following up any found foundry, but in this case it was difficult. I eventually found a reference in an 1841 directory, which merely showed that it was owned by Radford & Co. The directory included a Joseph Radford, Iron Founder, whose home was at 15 Great John Street. The map suggests that this would have been a large terraced house. No houses in the street now, but some small terraced houses less than 100 yards away will be familiar to viewers of TV’s long-running soap, Coronation Street, whose set is on the premises of Granada TV’s studios, which in turn are adjacent to the Museum of Science & Industry (MoSI). We’ll return to MoSI shortly.

    Having otherwise drawn a blank in my search for Radford and Waterloo Foundry, I happened to come across this:-

    Display...

    A 1972 photo of a cast iron bridge across the Rochdale Canal, made by Radford & Co in 1838.

    Now, returning to the Eagle Foundry, the 1841 Pigot & Slater’s Manchester & Salford directory shows that this was owned by Joseph Flockton & Co, iron founders, boiler, machine and hydraulic press makers. That’s all I could find, but then Eagle Foundry rang a bell, so to speak, and I recalled that it was later owned by E T Bellhouse & Co.

    There’s an excellent write-up here (PDF):-

    http://www.stats.uwo.ca/faculty/bellhouse/chapter4.pdf

    It tells of the large amount of ironwork despatched from this small foundry, including iron buildings for Australia, Peru, etc., and many to California for the 1849 Gold Rush. They also supplied gasometers, pipes and other equipment to gasworks in Athens, Brazil and Argentina.

    The article says that Bellhouse made hydraulic presses, but that ‘There is no evidence to confirm that Eagle Foundry was manufacturing hydraulic presses before Edward Bellhouse took it over in 1842’. We now know that there is evidence (from the 1841 directory).

    A stationary steam engine by E T Bellhouse has survived in Burma and can be seen near the bottom of this link:-
    Up Around the Bend, Maw Gyun, Burma 2009


    There’s an early Bellhouse hydraulic press in Manchester Museum of Science & Industry (MoSI):-


    In the next photo the brick building is the 'Power Hall' of MoSI, while the cast iron building is the aerospace museum, formerly Campfield Market Hall. The cast iron building was made by E T Bellhouse.



    The two columns supporting the sign came from Deptford Power Station in London. This was an incredibly ambitious project in its day, intended to house massive 10,000 HP Hick Hargreaves/Ferranti engine/alternator sets working at an unprecedented 10,000 volts AC. Here’s an engraving showing the columns and two of the smaller engines at the station:-


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    Asquith,

    Some good posts recently - the last is excellent! For example the Deptford cast iron pillars outside the Museum, and the old photo showing them in London.

    Also the Bellhouse engine in Burma - not many places left in the world where an engine like this is not derelict, but possibly waiting its next job! However, it sounds like a Marshall 12" is the engine for the progressive rice miller in Burma. I can see why, the crankpin on the Bellhouse is clearly not up to the job after 100-150 years, it shows signs of repair.

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    All this stuff about electricity. Shocking! That such a modern development has intruded. I have read recently of a book or summat similar called "When men were men and sheep were scared" - that's more like it

    This thread demonstrates two things above all others:

    1. the quantity of information that can be found when someone digs around;

    2. the possibilities of the game of "connections"

    Oh, and a third, most important of all:

    3. the stupendous work Asquith has put in to reveal and record it all.

    I am in absolute awe. Things like the Leicester Uni directories website were familiar to me long before they were mentioned here but the sheer effort required to research original sources such as on that site should not be underestimated. And piecing all the sources together makes me think Asquith could knock off a 5000 piece jigsaw in, oh, a short afternoon.

    An aside, if anyone knows anything about gramophone needles then pls could you PM me. I've found a few tins in a brown paper bag under my floorboards today: Edison-Bell "spear point", "tone point" and "loud". Presume the latter was for a 1930s rave but I am curious as to why all of these, made from silver steel, are "one use only".

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    Peter, Sitush,

    Thanks for the encouragement.

    Contrary to Sitush’s contention, my jigsaw-building productivity is very low, as demonstrated by the rate of progress of this thread!

    Sitush has prompted me to re-insert a link to the Leicester University’s provision of online copies of old UK directories. I have included it before in this rambling thread, but of course I should repeat it periodically.

    Historical Directories: Find by Location

    It’s an invaluable resource, but determined effort is sometimes needed to track down information, especially when seeking a name like Smith! Although the search function has its limitations, it does seem to be very accurate, a tribute to the character recognition capabilities of the software when dealing with old, small printed text.

    These directories, together with the Alan Godfrey reproductions of old Ordnance Survey maps, make this sort of treasure hunting a pleasure. If I find, say, a foundry or other industrial premises on a map, I can often go to the old trade directory nearest in date. This lists all the streets in alphabetical order, and then lists the occupants of all the properties along the street. Sometimes factory owners’ home addresses are given. This can be useful in connection with census returns for finding out more about a factory owner’s circumstances and his extended family. In turn, I hope this thread is of some use to amateur genealogists.

    Link to Alan Godfrey Maps:-

    The Godfrey Edition - Old Ordnance Survey Maps - Index

    I will repeat that the reproduction quality of these maps is high, they're cheap (about £2.50 or about $4 US) and the ordering service has been fantastic, in my experience.

    This game of connections is indeed enjoyable. Most of it can be done with the aid of a chair, but it's great to be able to visit the locations occasionally for inspiration, orientation, and, ideally, fortuitous discoveries of relics.

    As for Sitush's gramaphone/phonograph relics, I can't help. For old-time rave music reproduction machinery, I would draw attention to Sir Charles Parsons' ear-damaging Auxetophone:-

    The Auxetophone.

    Now, back to the former location of Richard Roberts’ Globe Works.

    On my recent stroll down Dickinson Street, I recently noticed this warehouse crane:-



    There are many cranes still to be seen on the walls of offices, restaurants, hotels, etc., left from the days when the buildings were warehouses or factories. The one in the photo was made by William Oram of Salford and was no doubt powered by a hydraulic ‘jigger’. The 1886 Slater’s directory tells me that William Oram & Co were Steam and Hydraulic Engineers, Machine Makers and Millwrights, at Greengate Iron Works, Salford. By casting his name of the crane, Mr Oram preserved some memory of his company, although at present I have no further information.

    Another example, elegant but anonymous:-


    And another, along with its hydraulic jigger, in MoSI:-


    Here’s an old picture featuring a similar crane:-

    http://images.manchester.gov.uk/web/...a.php?irn=9731

    Manchester had a system of water hydraulic mains operating at ½ ton per square inch. One of the pumping stations has been converted to the People’s History Museum:-

    People's History Museum : Manchester Museums

    Unfortunately most of the hardware has been removed. The focus of the museum is social history, particularly the conditions of the working class in the bad old days, or what some PM regulars will regard as Commie propaganda.

    Some poor quality snaps:-


    Overhead crane. It carries a 'Chester Hydraulic Engineering Co' nameplate, but I don’t know whether they made the crane themselves or subcontracted its construction.


    Old structure adapted to modified building. Old valve in background was made just along the River Irwell by Hamilton Wood.


    Apologies for window reflections, but this photo shows that the Victorians even took trouble over the appearance of cast iron water tanks, the smooth exterior giving little hint of the flanged bolted construction.


    Trade union membership certificate. A number of these are on display, along with banners used on union marches. Here’s part of a banner (oblique angle to avoid reflections from glass):-




    This is one of the hydraulic pumping machines taken from the People’s History Museum and now on display in MoSI. It was made by Galloways, and was originally driven by steam. At some point it was converted to electric drive by the addition of a motor made by the Electric Construction Company.

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    The title of this thread has long been inappropriate, as it covers numerous Manchester manufacturers. In order to stop the thread becoming too unwieldy () I’ve tended not to stray too far from Manchester itself, but the adjacent towns offer plenty of scope. One such is Bolton, now classed as being in ‘Greater Manchester’, and is 10 miles north west of Manchester centre.

    Having also strayed to London, and introduced Deptford Power Station, here’s a photo of one half of one of Deptford’s 10,000 HP engines at Hick Hargreaves works in Bolton. At that time the shops weren’t tall enough the assemble the engines vertically. I can't recall the source or date of the photo, but it would have been from The Engineer or Engineering

    As it turned out, the engines weren’t needed and were scrapped without running.

    Deptford’s 25-ton crane was built in Manchester, by Vaughan of West Gorton:-



    Engraving is from The Engineer, 23rd August 1889. The power comes from an endless high speed rope running along the wall, as on the Craven Bros crane on display at MoSI.

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    Well there's a teaser if there ever was one! Not needed, scrapped without being used? Any idea how many heads rolled?

  19. #639
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    Sitush,

    I can’t remember the full story. It’s a complex tale, set out in R H Parsons’ book The Early Days of the Power Station Industry (another welcome recommendation from Peter S). I've lent the book out, so can't refer to it.

    It was a brilliant concept, too far ahead of its time, of having a large central generating station remote from a built-up area, handy for bulk coal deliveries, and minimising transmission losses by transmitting high voltage AC power. I seem to recall that there were delays, problems downstream from the station, and costs were escalating with no short term prospect of financial return. I think it was decided to defer the work, and then finally to pull the plug. As it happened, at a stroke, Charles Parsons rendered these monstrous reciprocating engines, which weren’t ideally suited to power generation, obsolete. Well, not really at a stroke, as lawyers did their bit to slow down Parsons’ work (patents and all that).

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    That was enough info, thanks. Read it online, pages 30-40 at http://books.google.com/books?id=ZMw7AAAAIAAJ

    Looks like an interesting one. I might go back and start at page 1
    Last edited by Sitush; 02-01-2011 at 07:37 AM. Reason: missed url tag; total screw up


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