Giddings & Lewis No. 25-RT HBM info and advice - Page 12
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  1. #221
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    Just a quick note everybody,

    I have just done a quick lookover of Grigg's book to my original book.

    Grigg's has extra update pages that I don't have.

    I'll take a better look later.

    I think this has worked out for the better.

    Thanks Again Grigg!

    Got to go for now,
    Chris

  2. #222
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grigg View Post
    If anyone else is interested in a copy send me a PM and I'll have a few more made.

    Grigg
    PM sent, Thanks!!
    butch

  3. #223
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    Mail sent, thanks in advance!

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    Glad y'all like the book. I too am impressed by the amount of good easy to understand info it it, they don't quite make books like this any more...

    Several folks have asked if they could send me something for my troubles; if you do want to I'll certianly appreciate it. My paypall address is same as my Gmail address where you got the file/link.

    Grigg

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  6. #225
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    email sent via the pm email link which I have not used before.

  7. #226
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    Wow, just wow. Grigg's manual is simply fantastic, and, as I expected, it contains information which goes beyond the specific type of borer. Apart from its practical value, it's an industrial archaeolgy treasure!

    Thank you very much, Grigg!

  8. #227
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    Thanks Grigg, I got blown away by the quality of the scan.. It is a big file, but you can only get high quality with big...

    I will be able to get a hard copy printed here at the local office supplier as they offer that service...

    It is also out of copyright here in Australia as it was published before 1955 and has no identifiable human author (as it is a corporate book).. Most likely out of copyright in the US as well, as apparently back in those days to keep copyright you had to actually reapply 28 years later, which in the case of this book would have been 1975.. Be highly surprisingly if they did that...

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  10. #228
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    Browsing the book is quite an eye opener as to capabilities of the machines, provided you have the attachments..

    In fact if you could only have a small handful of machines in your shop, a decent sized table type horizontal borer would be one of them... When you see what Giddings and Lewis made for them.... Vertical heads, horizontal milling supports, facing heads etc..

    Although I know a lot of these attachments would not have been popular... After all why would you use a horizontal borer to do horizontal milling, when a horizontal miller is more efficient at the job, but as I said, if you could only have a small number of machines...

    Lathe, Bridgeport type mill, horizontal borer, surface grinder... If you were beyond the boondocks, probably not a lot you could not do with those machines if they were suitably tooled..

  11. #229
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    Quote Originally Posted by RC99 View Post
    Browsing the book is quite an eye opener as to capabilities of the machines, provided you have the attachments..

    In fact if you could only have a small handful of machines in your shop, a decent sized table type horizontal borer would be one of them... When you see what Giddings and Lewis made for them.... Vertical heads, horizontal milling supports, facing heads etc..

    Although I know a lot of these attachments would not have been popular... After all why would you use a horizontal borer to do horizontal milling, when a horizontal miller is more efficient at the job, but as I said, if you could only have a small number of machines...

    Lathe, Bridgeport type mill, horizontal borer, surface grinder... If you were beyond the boondocks, probably not a lot you could not do with those machines if they were suitably tooled..

    I agree, there's not much you can't do with those four in a little shop. Can I have a small shaper and a good geared head pillar drill as well please.

    On " Desert Island Discs " on BBC radio you're allowed the choice of eight records. I make that six machines on our " Desert Island Machine Shop ".

    If I could only have one it would be a 3ft table Hor Bore with a built in facing slide, squaring table, plus a four axis DRO, that would be ideal. That little " Kearns " 451 P that was mentioned earlier is my choice.

    Regards Tyrone.

  12. #230
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    I would love a copy as well!!

  13. #231
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    what is a squaring table?

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    Hi Bryan, it's a simple built in device that allows you to rotate the top table at exactly 0-90-180-270 degrees. Regards Tyrone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RC99 View Post
    Lathe, Bridgeport type mill, horizontal borer, surface grinder... If you were beyond the boondocks, probably not a lot you could not do with those machines if they were suitably tooled..
    Agree, which is why I've had my eye out for one for years. Sooner or later I'll find one of the size I want. But realistically, I need to eject the boat from the shed first, because with 2 planers sandwiched in there, I am really out of space.....

    Not that I'd allow a minor detail to stop me if I found the right machine at a price I was prepared to pay, mind you. I have acreage, I can always build another 'temporary' shed.

    PDW

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    Hi Bryan, it's a simple built in device that allows you to rotate the top table at exactly 0-90-180-270 degrees. Regards Tyrone.
    The Kearns S type I used to use at tech college had that - it was great for boring a lathe headstock out to take a bigger set of bearings. I didn't really know what I was doing which made it a very interesting project, and it came out fine thanks to that machine and the help & advice of the teachers.

    PDW

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    Got it - so it's like the "lock at exactly 90° intervals" feature of the modern CNC boring machines.

  18. #236
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    I have pulled the saddle off my #25.... Quite a simple easy procedure..

    My original plan is to scrape the vertical shears on the longitudinal ways, as what is happening as it is loose in the middle and tight on the ends... So in the middle the saddle screws a bit as it is loose..

    Of course plans are subject to change, I would nearly hazard a bet that I will end up scraping in the entire long ways...

    The underneath of the ways is not worn, and neither is the outside of the right hand vertical shear... So I have those to use as datums for initial levelling to get the borer sitting in the position it was at the factory when the ways were ground...

    20140607_150939.jpg 20140607_150610.jpg 20140607_150606.jpg

  19. #237
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    I used my "kingway" type tool to measure the wear on the vertical shears on the bed...

    Less then I anticipated at only 0.05mm or 0.002" concave wear on one side... Did not measure the other yet, but I expect it to be similar...

  20. #238
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    Quote Originally Posted by RC99 View Post
    I used my "kingway" type tool to measure the wear on the vertical shears on the bed...

    Less then I anticipated at only 0.05mm or 0.002" concave wear on one side... Did not measure the other yet, but I expect it to be similar...

    That's pretty good for an old machine. The tolerance would possibly be 0.001" in the full length when it was new.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    I took that cover off the back.... The one that says remove to adjust safety clutch....

    The gears inside are massive... Sort of thing you would find on a tractor... And in mint condition...

    20140625_110948.jpg

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    Nice, I would have thought there would have been a method of locking the nut that adjusts the safety clutch. Regards Tyrone.


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