Golden Anderson Trip Mechanism for Steam Engines
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  1. #1
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    Default Golden Anderson Trip Mechanism for Steam Engines

    Hello,

    I am looking to purchase some Golden Anderson Trip mechanisms to support active steam engines - in particular these bellows (2370). They are found just ahead of the throttle on a number of brands of steam engines especially the Ingersoll-Rand XPV compressor. GA industries does not support these. I have reproduced all the other parts except the bellows which is impractical at the low volume needed to support the remaining stock of engines in service. So if the rest of the mechanism you know of needs to stay that is fine. Be careful, there is a pretty stout spring compressed in the cage with the bellows.

    Thanks,

    Matt Janssen

    [email protected]comotive.com

    golden-anderson.jpg

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  2. #2
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    Matt:

    It is interesting to read your post about the Golden=Anderson trip mechanism. These were an overspeed shutdown mechanism and seemed about as reliable as can be had.
    In our modern times, overspeed trip mechanisms often use electromechanical controls and I have often wondered as to the reliability. On the hydro turbines, we often had a separate ballhead governor dedicated to overspeed protection. This tripped a micro switch which worked through a mess of electromechanical components to shut off the flow of water to the big turbines.

    I am surprised Golden-Anderson is still in existence, as so many of the firms which supplied components for steam engines are long gone.

    In looking over your post: Could you use a cylinder with a return spring instead of the bellows ? If the piston were fitted with something like Teflon rings to reduce stick-slip friction, it could approximate, if not duplicate the function of the bellows. You mention a spring in the cage with the bellows. The diagram or sectional view you posted is a bit small, but I think that a redesign with a cylinder having the spring bearing against the "rod side" of the piston might work. The redesign could include a means of "caging the spring" to install and remove it, as is done on truck brake cans.

  3. #3
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    Joe,

    Yes, you probably could. However, these steam engines run in contemporary corporate environments so replacing in kind is the only option that does not invoke prohibitive engineering studies.

    A DeZurik or similar air operated butterfly valve has proven to be sufficient in a number of steam engine transplants that have been done in the last 30 years in the U.S. This has the advantage of allowing other non-oil pressure controlled inputs for tripping such as low boiler pressure.

    If money was not a factor one might have a Gimpel valve adapted to the service. This is hydraulically actuated not unlike later Golden Anderson valves and much faster.

    Sincerely,

    Matt


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