Good Modern Manual Machining Vid
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  1. #1
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    Default Good Modern Manual Machining Vid

    IMHO anyway

    They (the CNC lot) may call it antique machining? …...we prefer proper machining,....well apart from a little bit

    Construccion de una cadena industrial - YouTube

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    Man...lots of parts with lots of detail and nothing you could pick up with one hand. Flat out..lots of work! Cool video and I'll bet that was a good paying job for the shop. I wonder what it is..looks like some type of chain.

    Stuart

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    He sure scratched the heck out of the mill table moving those blocks around. Needed a little more deburring there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    IMHO anyway

    They (the CNC lot) may call it antique machining? …...we prefer proper machining,....well apart from a little bit

    Construccion de una cadena industrial - YouTube
    Raymond has been linked before, the guy has salt for sure. This it the first time I've seen him actually travel (the spindle) for reference on something. He usually uses the table or slots & square or bevels to make the setups... Lightning quick like that.

    Thanks Limy,
    Matt

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    He’s fun to watch, I’ve seen a few of his videos. anyone know anything about him or where he is?

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    Not the usual youtube pretender.Doesnt try and sell you any tat either
    Its sad that you have to watch spainish, Russian, Lithuanian etc videos to get any content of interest , unless you enjoy watching someone screwcut at 20rpm

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lanso View Post
    He’s fun to watch, I’ve seen a few of his videos. anyone know anything about him or where he is?
    here's his youtube ''about'' page - he's in Spain (probably the Northern region which is more industrial) EL METAL RaymondMenendez
    - YouTube


    Twitter too RaymondMenendez (@AceMenendez) on Twitter

    And a google something or other Browser not supported - Google+

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    Quote Originally Posted by pressbrake1 View Post
    Not the usual youtube pretender.Doesnt try and sell you any tat either
    Its sad that you have to watch spainish, Russian, Lithuanian etc videos to get any content of interest , unless you enjoy watching someone screwcut at 20rpm
    That fast

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    One thing that surprised me is the lack of fixtures and the very limited use of "stops" to position the next piece in the same exact place, without the need of aligning manually each part. The use of sacrificial plate where you can cut grooves, drill holes, etc. where you need would have also protected the table from so much scratching.

    Paolo

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    He has quite a few simple fixtures /stops on his other videos.

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    Quote Originally Posted by atomarc View Post
    I wonder what it is..looks like some type of chain.

    Stuart
    Yes. A common meaning of "cadena" in Spanish is chain.

    -Marty-

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paolo_MD View Post
    One thing that surprised me is the lack of fixtures and the very limited use of "stops" to position the next piece in the same exact place, without the need of aligning manually each part. The use of sacrificial plate where you can cut grooves, drill holes, etc. where you need would have also protected the table from so much scratching.

    Paolo
    He has lots of jigs and fixtures, personally I dont trust stops for repeatability unless its rough work

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    Quote Originally Posted by pressbrake1 View Post
    He has lots of jigs and fixtures, personally I dont trust stops for repeatability unless its rough work
    It 's always spot on for something that doesn't matter, as soon as you rely on it it lets you down, although I think that "old hands have a knack of making it work.

    An old guy I used to know who was an ex floor borer man but was on a big horizontal mill when I knew him ,I can't remember ever seeing him use a clock ,it was all stops and bits of cigarette paper and a spirit level .He did work which was critical in that it could not be allowed to twist or distort while being machined ,his stuff never failed inspection which could only really be checked much further down the line on final assembly.

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    Looks to 2 to 3x speed (close anyway) and it doesn’t take a lot of trickery to keep this guy going.

    On his setups @ 1:40 I count 2 T slot key blocks parallel to the cross travel (usually hardened with a close fitting key for the T slot and sometimes, like his, are tapped for adjustable stop screws).

    At 2:14-18 a slip block for referencing the part parallel over the front of the table finger close (close enough for flame cut part anyway, here it doesn’t matter).

    At 2:49 he’s got the key slot blocks back on & you can clearly see the key down in the T slots. It’s also clear the T slots haven’t had a lot of banging done to them...

    2 clamp straps down on the table for a parallel fence to the spindle at 3:18 (using a clock indicator here).

    At 3:22 you see 2 big woodruff keys underneath his clamp straps (this is very smart with irregular parts & you don’t have spherical washers).

    At 3:38 the part is up on some parallels and against 2 small (narrow) knees. Because they can be anywhere but need to be the same from the slot to front face they (likely) are keyed to the T slots, or (if not keyed) set from the front of the table using a story pole.

    At 3:45 he has the T slots parallel to the spindle with a strap parallel to the cross way and a big key snugged in the slot for a small right angle stop.

    His particular machine has a rotating top table. Some have locks for 0-90-180-270, but for normal stuff all are set with the slot either parallel to the spindle & bed ways, or parallel to the cross way travel. This is the only time an HBM driver will do something similar to miller trying to make 2 vices the same on a table using machine travels (back & forth a few times with an indicator).

    Since you really can’t trust a partially machined weldment and prior machining “still being right”. At 6:35 he’s dinking the part back & forth (rare)… At 6:46 he finds the part side but does not find the bore height (already knows the spindle height to table).

    At 7:58 he’s making sure the face down is OK (not warped) and shimming before clamping (square on the table works pretty well too if you like).

    At 8:42 he’s got 2 long keys stuck in the front slot… After that, well they’re just chain links.

    I've said it before, I'd hate to battle the guy,
    Matt

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    Excellent video. Reminded me of " the days " on a Lucas or a big DeVlieg...


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