Good WWII AA Shell Manuf' Video
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    Default Good WWII AA Shell Manuf' Video

    Like the title says - good turret and vertical lathe + rotary transfer shots.

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    A thought ;- No wonder war is so expensive !

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    I like the part at the end where it is stated that if the machining tolerances are followed, the weight will not be correct. The weight is checked after all the machining is done. It is up to the shop to determine which tolerances to change to meet the weight requirement. Ooookkkay!!

    Tom

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    Quote Originally Posted by TDegenhart View Post
    I like the part at the end where it is stated that if the machining tolerances are followed, the weight will not be correct. The weight is checked after all the machining is done. It is up to the shop to determine which tolerances to change to meet the weight requirement. Ooookkkay!!

    Tom
    I had to watch that part twice, and was still like ''yawot''

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    I'm interested in the purpose of the spot welded plate at the bottom of the shell. A buffer to protect the body during propellant firing?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milland View Post
    I'm interested in the purpose of the spot welded plate at the bottom of the shell. A buffer to protect the body during propellant firing?
    That had me puzzled as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    That had me puzzled as well.
    They clearly thought it was needed, invested both time and materials in the automatic spot welder and then the processing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    That had me puzzled as well.
    Yeah, the welded steel plate was to ensure that the thin-walled, high explosive shell didn’t detonate prematurely on firing (due to any imperfections in the forging).

    Section 6, Manufacturing of Metalic Components of Artillery Ammunition - Google Books


    Section 6-51

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    My take on the tolerances was if the shell was made in maximum (and presumably minimume) material condition as per tolerances the part would exceed the weight tolerance either too light or too heavy, thus the manufacturer must chose dimensional tolerances by whatever methods made sense given so the weight comes out in range.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Menke View Post
    My take on the tolerances was if the shell was made in maximum (and presumably minimume) material condition as per tolerances the part would exceed the weight tolerance either too light or too heavy, thus the manufacturer must chose dimensional tolerances by whatever methods made sense given so the weight comes out in range.
    Several thoughts about this. First, I don't know what the machines and processes in use were capable of. Maybe what was on the print was the best that could be held on production basis. Otherwise tighten the tolerances until the weight would be correct if the dimensions were in tolerance. Second, instead of being the last step to accept or reject, there should be in process checks along the way. I did note in the book reference that reject shells could be salvaged.

    Tom

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackrainstorm View Post
    Yeah, the welded steel plate was to ensure that the thin-walled, high explosive shell didn’t detonate prematurely on firing (due to any imperfections in the forging).

    Section 6, Manufacturing of Metalic Components of Artillery Ammunition - Google Books


    Section 6-51
    Danke shon

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    Danke shon
    You guys were in a hair breadth of that being your native language.

    Tom

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    I liked this film. It is Great and thanks for sharing it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TDegenhart View Post
    You guys were in a hair breadth of that being your native language.

    Tom
    True - and more than once


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