Help Identifying a Lathe
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  1. #1
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    Default Help Identifying a Lathe

    A lathe came up for sale here locally and I went to go check it out today. It is a 7 x 36 machine, and I grabbed some pictures of the tags. I couldn't find any other identifying tags or markings. It struck me that for a 7 x 36 machine it was quite sturdy, I would guess it was at least twice as heavy as my dad's 9 x 36 southbend. The owner hadn't had much luck finding any information, although for what it's worth he did say someone had come and looked at it and they thought that maybe it had come off a boat. I don't have many pictures but I think can answer most questions. The leadscrew was very large as well and the through spindle was ~1.125". Any help would be appreciated!

    Dayton - Album on Imgur
    Lathe2 - Album on Imgur
    Lathe1 - Album on Imgur
    Lathe3 - Album on Imgur
    Lathe3 - Album on Imgur

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    Jupiter and Dayton are not familiar names for lathes. An all-metric lathe in the USA is probably an import. Import machines often have names that disguise the actual country of origin and hide the actual maker's name.

    When you say 7 x 36, what do those numbers represent? Maybe swing or center height and bed length or center to center?

    Larry

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    I see Jupiter lathe company LTD but not many lathes about.
    IT does look like a nice machine.
    Guess it is worth 500 to 1500 but parts hard to find so better be in good shape IMHO.

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    Larry, sorry for not clarifying, swing over bed is 7" and I think the bed length was 36"

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    I agree with Michiganbuck. The lathe looks to be well designed. The fact it can only cut metric thread pitches can be a deal-breaker if you plan on cutting US threads with pitches measured in threads per inch. Unless the lathe has a set of "transposing gears" for cutting inch-pitch threads, it will be useless for cutting common US threads.

    The tags on the lathe are held on with "drive screws" or rivets, so the lathe could well have been "badged" by a seller who bought lathes from the actual manufacturer.
    The Taiwan and Chinese machine tool builders and sellers have often played off respected US machine tool builders' names to make their products more "saleable" to US buyers. Examples are the clones of the Bridgeport Milling machine which include a "Hartford" , and the free use of names such as Milwaukee and Buffalo. Dayton, being associated with Grainger's catalog as a brand name, might well have been one of those things a seller of the lathe did to try to give it some "brand recognition" or similar "buyer appeal".

    It's a good looking lathe from the photos, but seeing it up close would tell the tale as far as actual workmanship, fit of the working parts, and overall finish and "feel" is concerned.

    There are 3 deal breakers in my opinion:

    1. Lathe capacity is small, if the 7" swing is actual. This would mean that if you took a rule and measured from the centerline of the spindle to the inside edge of the bedways, you should be reading about 3 1/2". This is quite a small swing and will limit the jobs you can do.

    2. Lathe is setup to only cut metric threads

    3. Lathe is an unknown, and getting any kind of information or parts for it will be next to impossible (never underestimate the power of the internet). My thought here is that the spindle nose may well be threaded with some metric thread, and you will be on your own to measure it up and make backplates to mount additional chucks or faceplates. A lathe this small would be a candidate for a set of collets as well as chucks. The 1.25" spindle bore is what Southbend used on their Heavy 10" lathes.
    The Heavy 10" lathes can use 5C collets- a versatile size of collet and can handle work from 1 1/16" to 1 1/16". For small work, a set of collets is really handy. This lathe, being unknown as far as the spindle nose and taper inside the spindle bore, would likely be fitted with a "collet chuck" mounted on the spindle nose. That brings it back to being able to come up with a backplate to mount the collet chuck.

    I imagine that, being out in Wyoming, you are in a kind of "desert" as far as availability of good used machine tools for home shops is concerned. If you need a small lathe and can live with this one's limitations, then check it carefully to determine actual condition. Appearances can be deceiving, and photos posted online are even moreso.

    My own guess is that this lathe may have been made in one of the former Soviet-bloc countries. The design, along with the fit and finish (at least as far as the photos go) leads me to think it is a bit better class of machine than the small lathes coming out of China or India. A clue might be found by looking closely at the motor and the electrical controls. The finned housing on the motor looks "imported" - US small frame motors rarely have finned housings. The motor may be original to the lathe as it seems to have been mounted with no signs of adaptation. If you can get to the motor nameplate, it may give a clue as to country of origin for the lathe.

    How the lathe found its way to Wyoming (or nearby) is anyone's guess. It does not appear to have been abused, nor does it look to have been re-painted. Rather than belabor how the lathe got to your neck of the woods, the important thing is to make the big decision as to whether you can live with the lathe as it is (metric screw cutting and small capacity) and then to ascertain as much as possible as to condition of the lathe.

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    looking at the gas cans and other things about it looks like a 12" or so lathe, perhaps x 13" or 14", spindle center to bed 7" would suggest that...

    I was thinking all the numbers on the chart plate suggested Metric and inch, so yes if it is metric only that would be a great/huge deal changer...

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    Google shows a Jupiter Machine Tools in India, does not look like the standard Chinese machine, so that maybe the source.

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    ??? looks like a imperial gearbox to me...seems to use a X/63 translation to cut metric threads....gearbox includes 30tpi too so metric is easy.

    Looks like a nice little machine.

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    I think it is not metric only. The upper right section of the chart looks like a standard pitch chart to me.

    allan

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    Default Indentifcation

    Quote Originally Posted by turin1989 View Post
    A lathe came up for sale here locally and I went to go check it out today. It is a 7 x 36 machine, and I grabbed some pictures of the tags. I couldn't find any other identifying tags or markings. It struck me that for a 7 x 36 machine it was quite sturdy, I would guess it was at least twice as heavy as my dad's 9 x 36 southbend. The owner hadn't had much luck finding any information, although for what it's worth he did say someone had come and looked at it and they thought that maybe it had come off a boat. I don't have many pictures but I think can answer most questions. The leadscrew was very large as well and the through spindle was ~1.125". Any help would be appreciated!

    Dayton - Album on Imgur
    Lathe2 - Album on Imgur
    Lathe1 - Album on Imgur
    Lathe3 - Album on Imgur
    Lathe3 - Album on Imgur
    Here it is: often sold branded as the "Coronet": http://www.lathes.co.uk/coronetindia/
    My thanks,
    Tony.

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    There were some lathes made in France under the Jupiter name but I don’t see any matches for yours in the image search I did.
    History | Somab - Machines Outils - Constructeur Français
    There is a French language forum that I think is based in Switzerland
    Vieilles machines a courroies
    If your lathe was made in Europe and you can converse in French or are good with one of the translation apps maybe someone on that forum will recognize it.
    it may have been sold under a different name somewhere else
    Since any available parts for most old lathes no matter where they are made tend to be quite expensive compared to what you can buy the used lathe for I would think that the ability to buy replacement parts and where it is made should be a smaller consideration than the overall construction and condition of the machine and whether it will meet your needs.
    As has been mentioned if it is not set up to cut inch threads that could be a major draw back for someone in the U.S.A.
    Another forum new to me turned in a search showing a lathe from Ernault
    Tour a metaux : H. Ernault Paris - Questions diverses - Restauration | Usinages

    Their Lathe forum is here
    Tours | Usinages
    The links may prove useful for someone else even if they don’t turn up any answers for this lathe.
    Regards,
    Jim

    P.S. I didn't see Tony's post before I posted looks like it was at almost the same time.

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    So from tony's pose the treading half nut seems to be on the left of the saddle.. be sure it is with the lathe or may be needing to make one up.
    What ballpark price is he considering?

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    I'm an idiot...14" swing over bed, not 7". He wants 2000 for it, there is some tooling but far from a haul.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tonylathes View Post
    Here it is: often sold branded as the "Coronet": Coronet of India lathes
    My thanks,
    Tony.
    Thanks Tony!


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