Help ID'ing a dividing-head with an MT3 spindle - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Ken,
    I did get a chuckle from your explanation of Bubba's contributions to my problem. In this forum dedicated to restoring antique machinery, I suspect that traces of his work probably show up pretty often. <g>

    Thanks also for the practical advice about getting that bushing out, and (eventually) replacing it more safely. And for expanding on the subject of grease, too.

    Thanks,
    Irv

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by VtSlowLearner View Post
    Ken,
    I did get a chuckle from your explanation of Bubba's contributions to my problem. In this forum dedicated to restoring antique machinery, I suspect that traces of his work probably show up pretty often. <g>

    Thanks also for the practical advice about getting that bushing out, and (eventually) replacing it more safely. And for expanding on the subject of grease, too.

    Thanks,
    Irv
    Uhh.. given some among us know how to make right decent explosives with grease?

    "Expanding on" wants taken with a modicum of care..



    Seriously.. AGE deterioration is one of the greatest of enemies to the working effectiveness of greases.

    A lube that is second-rate but doesn't "get worse as fast" as an initially better one has advantage in any goods that are lubed, then forgotten about for decades. Dividing heads and rotabs tend to fall into that category.

    MbS2 and cousins, it doesn't matter as much that the "oil-distributing soap" has degraded. The ultimate anti-friction player isn't a released absorbed released again lighter oil. It is the myriad of tiny perfectly round MbS2 molecules acting as roller-bearings.

    They'll "just do that", even when baked-onto telco equipment rack non-roller bearing equipment tray slide rails, looking like nothing more magical than an ordinary coat of grey-black paint.

    2CW

  4. #23
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    On the heads with a quick index plate on the spindle the worm shaft bushing is eccentric to disengage the worm from the wheel.Yours obviously isn't so,however it still may have some off set to adjust the worm clearance.When you get the spanner nut loose try turning the bushing either way to find the loose spot.
    I would think you could slide the bushing and worm shaft out after the bearing on the spanner nut end was undone from the shaft.It should be a straight worm,I don't think it would have a double enveloping worm.
    The bushing if not eccentric may just screw in.

    600wt steam cylinder oil was the standard for bronze worm wheels,We now use Mobil SHC 680 synthetic.
    If you have a bronze gear and it is black then you can be sure that someone used gear oil with an ep additive.

  5. #24
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    I'm a big fan of moly grease,I keep a tube in my tool box.Problem is that even a #2 grease in something like a DH it will never get hot enough for it to flow.Unless you pack it full the first couple of revolutions it gets wiped off and pushed aside.
    Oil on the other hand gets distributed any time any thing moves.Mix some moly paste with some heavy non ep oil would be good or use one of the synthetics.


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