Help me please! Need identify. UNUSUAL ANTIQUE STEAM or GASOLINE ENGINE UNIQUE MODEL?
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Surrey, BC
    Posts
    137
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    15

    Default Help me please! Need identify. UNUSUAL ANTIQUE STEAM or GASOLINE ENGINE UNIQUE MODEL?

    Dear machinists, engineers, and enthusiasts. I am puzzled about this interesting engine. It looks like a steam engine, but I think it is a gasoline engine. I am also puzzled about the year it was made. It seems like a very unique piece of machinery history. It is 22 inches long and 7 inches wide. The flywheel rotates freely, but I haven't plugged the engine in. Why does it even need to be plugged in? Constant spark? Will accept any ideas.

    THANK YOU!!!

    s-l1600-5.jpg

    s-l1600-3.jpg

    s-l1600-6.jpg

    s-l1600-9.jpg

    s-l1600-4.jpg

  2. Likes Leg17 liked this post
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Shandaken, NY, USA
    Posts
    4,346
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1177
    Likes (Received)
    6938

    Default

    What you have is a "teaching model" of a Corliss steam engine. It appears (at least to me) to be the kind of model that might be used in a classroom. The engine would be turned over by hand so the students could see the workings of the Corliss valve gear.

    The motor was a later addition. It is what is known as a "shaded pole" motor, used in small appliances and other very light-duty applications. The shaded pole motor is of much later vintage than the model. Chances are someone added the motor to keep the model turning as part of a display (toy shop window ? store window at Christmastime or similar type of display ? ) .

    Constructed as the model is, it was never intended to be run as an actual steam engine (or on compressed air as nearly as I can tell from your photos). Interesting curio, probably from back when classes in science in elementary schools included some rudimentary material about the steam engine.

  4. Likes 3512B, Lester Bowman liked this post
  5. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Surrey, BC
    Posts
    137
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    15

    Default

    Interesting. The only thing is that it has many metal parts, including the flywheel. If the model would be just for teaching, I think the flywheel would be made out of wood. In this case, it is meatal and it is quite heavy. I think it is an actual functioning model of the engine, but what type? Corliss had a more complicated system of the valve controls.

  6. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Surrey, BC
    Posts
    137
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    15

    Default

    But I agree, it might be a teaching model also, just a well made one.

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Modesto california USA
    Posts
    670
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1172
    Likes (Received)
    851

    Default

    Take the head and valve cover off and find out. You'll be able to tell what powered it hopefully. I saw it for sale too but it is just a little bit unrealistic and to modern for my taste. Let us know what you find out. Have you put any air pressure in it yet?

    I do not believe it is an engine which can be run on pressure. Like Joe said it appear's to be a mock up of a Corliss engine but not a very accurate one at that. Not deriding the engine at all. But I know what you collect and have seen some of your engines and they have been very nice indeed. What made you buy it ?

  8. #6
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Lambertville, MI USA
    Posts
    2,578
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1077
    Likes (Received)
    1153

    Default

    I’ve seen models like this many times at antique engine shows through the years. There made by retired men that generally don’t have the skill or equipment or resources to build a working model. They collect bits and bobs of cast off material and to the best of there ability build a model, generally something from there youth. If you were to take the cylinder head off you would most likely find that it has no piston or valves. You could say that they fall under the heading of folk art.

    It needs to be plugged in to run. The electric motor runs the steam engine.

  9. Likes Lester Bowman liked this post
  10. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Webster Groves, MO
    Posts
    7,342
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1851
    Likes (Received)
    3405

    Default

    One time at a medical equipment show a fellow who sold valves and fittings had aa beautiful working model engine in a glass case. It was two stage with upright wood lagged cylinders, maybe 18" high overall. He had a silent air compressor under the table and the engine was running nicely. I asked "That is great, but what does it have to do with your products?" He said "Not a damned thing, but look at the crowd I have."

    Bill

  11. Likes Lester Bowman, Romak liked this post
  12. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Surrey, BC
    Posts
    137
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    15

    Default

    Hi Lester!

    I haven't purchased it. I thought of getting it to run a salesman sample of a bread-making machine.

  13. Likes Lester Bowman liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •