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  1. #381
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    Congratulations on fine job. Glad to see it all done. I enjoyed very much following along with you on this journey.
    Good luck with all the paying work that will come along for it.

    Harold

  2. #382
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    And DONE!

    That is, done-done. Anything after this is just minor detail work, really. She is now back up to being 100% operational!

    With the electrics done and able to be run at will, I recalled one thing I'd forgotten to do a long while back- hit the feed rod gearing with a little open gear lube.



    While the shafts are easily greased, nothing seems to apply to the gear teeth themselves. So I figured it was either periodically trowel some grease in there, or periodically hit it with the OGL.

    With that, the last major item remaining on the list was the coolant/cutting-oil pump. It'd already been rebuilt, of course, and a little while back I got in some big 3/4" Swagelok stainless compression fittings, and installed them.



    The lower one is properly installed, but the upper one was just left in place, owing to Mr. Rozen's kind donation of an older solid-hinge style spigot assembly. As I've said, I'd prefer that one even if just from an aesthetic standpoint (hey, I like old machines, okay? ) but at this point, it's still up in the air.

    My staff instrument tech supplied me with a prebent piece of 3/4" tubing a few days ago, and I was able to get a section properly cut, deburred and installed.



    But, that revealed a not-unexpected problem. As shown earlier, I'd made the 'pickup' tube a solid piece, including the dip tube. The problem there is that given the rigidity and close tolerances of this instrument tubing, it was very difficult to manhandle everything into place.

    As I said, I'd kind of expected this, and I wanted to extend the dip tube, so I got another fitting out of that box 'o junk parts, and bored a step in the NPT end.



    I then cut a section of straight tubing several inches longer than the old 'one piece' setup, and TIG welded it to the modified fitting.



    That brought the suction end down to within about 4" of the sump floor, more than 4" longer than the old piece.



    And, just to be sure I didn't actually forget what I said I was probably going to forget, about two months ago. I sealed the sump cover back in place, and taped the drain plug.



    Cutting the old J-tube down to a long elbow, let me install the whole tube and strainer with ease, and cinch down all the fittings. It's now solid as a proverbial rock.



    Now, for the output spigot, as I said, I was going to use the old-style Hardinge assembly- and may still. But local shops have a very poor selection of fittings, which actually kind of surprised me. I picked up what I thought would work, but nobody had the right kind of reducer elbow, the right length nipple for the horizontal run, or a longer nipple for the vertical run, since the one that came with the assembly has damaged threads at one end.

    So, at least for the time being, back to Plan A, and use the stainless bits I'd already had on the way before the Hardinge piece was offered. Which will fit somewhere around here:



    As it turns out, one of the other prebent J-tubes out of the parts box, after a little cleaning, fit just right.



    I'd ordered a 90-degree 1/4" turn valve, and a chunk of big bore Loc Line- in grey, can't have that blue and orange clashing with my motif here, after all - and with the J-tube, it all fell right into place.



    And that's it! I have a 5-gallon pail of Mobilmet 426 cutting oil on the way (I was actually surprised it didn't arrive today, Friday) so I haven't, of course, actually tested the pump system, but I have every reason to expect it'll work just fine.

    And that, Ladies and Gentlemen, after just short of four months, and some six hundred and forty published photos, completes this project!



    I would like to personally thank the following people, in no particular order, for their help in completing this project.

    SAF, or 'Sid' of MTW Electric, Inc. for his peerless work in setting up the magnetic starters and decoding the wiring necessary to make the installation virtually trouble-free.

    Jim Rozen for donating the Hardinge coolant assembly.

    Stu Friedberg for the donation of approximately eight metric tons of turret tooling.

    Calvin B for his donation of some turret tooling, and also his help with tracking down some of the old wiring diagrams.

    Rodney "Weldingrod1" for CNC milling me a new brass switch plate to go over the buttons. (Not seen yet, it still needs minor TLC and painting.)

    RDoty for printing me up some heat-shrink wire markers and hot-footing them over just in the the nick.

    And everyone else that has offered useful advice and support!

    There's still a few detail bits to do: The cutting-oil outlet needs a support clamp, I still need to pick up some NGLI 0 or 00 grease for certain parts of this assembly (or set up a high-pressure oil gun, although I may also do both) I need to do a final dial-in of the turret concentricity, and then bore a couple of the toolholders I have (which came undersized, and I'm assuming they were supposed to be bored-in-place) and of course some of the tooling needs a little attention before it can be used.

    The only big thing remaining to do is to fab up a backsplash to help contain some of the oil- I have the metal, but the local guy with a CNC press brake is in the middle of a hot gotta-have-it-now oilfield project, so it'll be a few days before I can have some minor bending done.

    And, as I've said, the first project on the list for this machine, ironically enough, only needs two tools- one for the cross slide and one for the turret. And I'll have to make them both.

    Again, big thanks to everyone who helped, offered support, or just read and enjoyed the build. There will be more to come, as I run a few jobs through this thing, or even just play with some of the tools.

    Doc.

  3. #383
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    Doc,
    I've been following along for quite awhile now and have just one (well maybe just one),
    When do you sleep ? {:>)
    Larry S
    Fort Wayne, IN

  4. #384
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    One minor suggestion:

    Put a stainless ball valve on the sump drain, and put the pipe plug on the outlet of the valve.
    Nothing more fun that having nasty sump contents spraying all over while you're trying to
    maneuver the catch can. When you go to change it, remove the pipe plug and put a
    hose barb in its place. Etc.

    I once has a *very* unpleasant experience with a sump on an old horizontal mill in Voc-Tech
    school. Soluble oil and all.

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  6. #385
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    That's not a bad idea, but keep in mind I'll be using cutting oil, not water-based coolant.

    And while I have quite a bit of work for this thing, I'll by no means be running it eight hours a day, let alone two shifts.

    I figure I won't have to muck out the sump but once every five years or so- and it's actually well positioned to get a catch tray under it:



    When do you sleep?
    -At work, like everyone else.

    Doc.

  7. #386
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    I made up a couple small trays out of wire mesh, leave them in the machine's splash pan, to set parts/tools whatever in so they can still drain. A taller one, made similarly is nice for a couple of the wrenches etc that need to live with the machine. Helpful when things have cutting oil all over and you don't want them dripping onto the floor/shelves, and avoids misplacing all over. Makes for easier clean-up afterwards too.

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  9. #387
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    Yep. Already have a couple sections of hardware-store perforated sheet I've been noodling over, to make something exactly like that.

    Like all of us, there's a big habit in putting tools, parts and whatever in the chip tray, but on this unit, that'd be dunking it in oil.

    I figure I'll need maybe as many as three- One a 'tray' specifically for setting tools out of the way, but at hand and up out of the oil. Although I plan a rack or drawer or pan or something specifically to store the tools I'll need for this thing.

    I'm still planning a backsplash, and might wind up making a simple rack on that, with pins for wrenches and a tab with slots for allens and the like. Might be too far a reach, though, so still noodlin' that one.

    A second tray that sits in the drip tray, for parts fresh out of the chuck. That'll let 'em drain off most of the way.

    And a third, which might wind up being just a stainless pan or something, for stacking/storing the parts afterward, and moving them to the next machine.

    AND... I'll also need some way to store the collets in an organized manner, as well as the spare tooling, so I may need to come up with something like a small tool cart. Something I can roll out as needed, then roll back out of the way when that machine isn't in use.

    Doc.

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  11. #388
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    I had been thinking about backsplashes too but it hasn't been a problem on the Wade- maybe because its all collet work for me so no chuck to fling racing stripes all over creation. Yeah, that multiple tray system is good, I work them that way also. The wade has the uber inside-cabinet door rack with storage for collets in 64ths plus a few extras (have a good bit of the set at this point- empty holes in the rack is a massive OCD trigger and gets me searching on ebay lol), the rack on the inside of the door keeps them cleaner.

    When I got the machine, mice had found their way in somehow and boy howdy that was a stinky bit of cleanup.

  12. #389
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    The wade has the uber inside-cabinet door rack with storage for collets in 64ths plus a few extras[.]
    -This thing, of course, has no cabinet, but I've been thinking of whipping up a sort of low, drawered cart to go under the drip tray, between the legs.

    Years ago, I whipped up a low tray with fixed wheels (that is, not casters) to roll under the Sheldon, which has become a very useful scrap-bits tray.

    Something like that, except of course taller and perhaps with a little more sophistication, might work here. Either fixed (as in, it doesn't roll) but with three or four wide, shallow drawers, or perhaps a rolling cabinet with a drawer or two, and room on top for tooling and whatnot.

    The space isn't terribly wide, less than two feet I think, but a small cabinet of some sort I think would be fairly handy.

    I've been planning something like that for the Springfield, too- the space under its drip tray is much lower and wider, so I was thinking two half-width rollers and/or drawers. Basically a place to store the Sjogren chuck and all the 3J collets, the various soft-jaw parts, the lesser-used toolpost blocks, etc.

    Doc.

  13. #390
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    Made any parts with this yet Doc?

  14. #391
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    Not a one.

    One of my other jobs is as a cartoonist and publisher (sort of ) and I needed to rush the next four books out in time for Black Friday. So pretty much the day I 'finished' the lathe, I shifted gears back to the print shop- finished up the artwork, finished laying out all four books, and then printed, collated, stapled, bound and trimmed a couple hundred of them for the launch.

    And, of course, my online store started going flaky right about then, so I had to whip up a quick-and-dirty alternative, and... well, I've been sketching, wrapping, packaging and shipping ever since.

    I also ran low sooner than expected, and had to restart printing more- AND keep up with outgoing orders.

    Going by historical trends, this run will probably be pretty well burned out by Monday, and I plan to jump right back into this beast. I got the metal in for the backsplash early last week, and just got in my pail of Mobilmet 426 this past Monday.

    I figure I'll make sure the oil system works, and start making the custom tools I'll need hopefully early next week.

    Doc.

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  16. #392
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    You haven't lived until the flood reaches the spinning chuck and it flings a tide of oil & chips all over you.

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  18. #393
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    Well, I don't plan on using the actual chuck all that much. The collet assembly has an interesting 'splash guard' that supposedly catches and redirects most of the spray, and I hope the small parts and a control of the oil flow can minimize the splashing.

    That said, I plan a small "shield" to go on the front of the cross slide- clear or opaque, I haven't decided, it'll likely just have a magnetic base or something to block a little more of the splashage.

    There's a guy on YT with a No.2 (the one with the yellow ball handles, as seen here on PM a couple years ago) that apparently came with a low clip-on shield on the front lip of the drip tray.

    Not 100% sure what that's for, other than to catch the splash when dropped parts (from parting operations) land in the half-inch of oil in the tray. I figure I may try whipping up something like that, too.

    And hey, if I have to buy a rubber apron and wear galoshes, that's what I'll do.

    Doc.


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