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  1. #401
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    if/when you fab such a shield, the more you can wrap it around the chuck the better.
    -Oh, sure. This whole thing is going to be a learning experience. I used flood coolant on the Logan turret lathe, and with a bit of control on the flow and positioning of the Loc-Line nozzle, I was generally able to minimize any spray.

    I also never used the coolant with a chuck, I only used it with collets.

    Though on one job, I had to hastily fab up a quick guard, simply because both the operation and the material (hex stock) flung more than I could control.

    There was a photo here on PM not too long ago, someone had found a large belt-era lathe at a junkyard, as I recall. (Not junked, it was in the yard's shop and occasionally used.)

    Apparently whoever used it either had coolant or liked to slobber cutting oil, as they'd cut a tire open, and fitted it as a nearly-fully-encircling splash guard. That might have been getting a bit too carried away.

    I hope to be able to get back on this project later this week, so we'll see what happens.

    Doc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DocsMachine View Post
    Apparently whoever used it either had coolant or liked to slobber cutting oil, as they'd cut a tire open, and fitted it as a nearly-fully-encircling splash guard. That might have been getting a bit too carried away.
    Don't let that turn ya off!

    Makes GREAT sense! Yah gets LOTS of choices as to size and depth!

    Ugly or not, cut the sidewall so as to retain a "cup" effect, and they can become about the most effective spray collecter/diverters as ever were. Sawzall the buggers. Clamp a drain in with a coupla ring flanges. Anything you through-bolt as to mounts and such self-seals, too.

    Just prepare for some work to cut the bead in the rim if yah decide to split and hinge. DAMHIKT, but it took a grit blade to finally get through it. Steel & Aramid belts, tread area, were cake by comparison, sidewalls like butter.

  3. #403
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    lol a tire is a maybe bit much lol... but can't fault the rigidity and ease of setup. Didn't know you ran flood on the Logan and here I am trying to suggest stuff...

  4. #404
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    Didn't know you ran flood on the Logan and here I am trying to suggest stuff...
    -Hey, just because I ran coolant, using a homebrew setup, on one might-as-well-be-home-shop machine for a couple of years doesn't make me an expert.

    As I said, this will very much be a learning experience. I fully expect to go through more than a few gyrations on this machine before I can declare it 'dialed in'.

    Doc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DocsMachine View Post
    As I said, this will very much be a learning experience.
    On a turret lathe?

    The good news - and "fun" part - is there will ALWAYS be sumthin' new to learn, even when yer old and grey.

    The bad news is you will need to already know it a week ago to hit yer due-out dates!

    Asi es la vida

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  7. #406
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    Speaking of slinging liquids reminded me of a previous plant manager we had. One night I got called over to the Flexo dept to fix a leak on a coating unit. As soon as I got there the P Manager came over and wanted to know how long before it was up and running. "Got to find the leak first".So as I went around to turn on the coating pump the manager was bent over looking at the chamber and the hose came off and sprayed him with coating. I quickly turned off the pump and turned away biting my lip and tried to nonchalauntly wipe the tears from my eyes!

    Not a week later I was working on a gear hob and had just put a few hundred gallons of oil in it when he came by and wanted to know when it would be running.I told him I was going to see if it would cycle now.The coolant pipe was above his head with a 2" rubber hose on the end and the guards were off the back.The coolant was not supposed to start but it did and he got a few gallons of oil sprayed on him. This was even funnier than the coating incident! I had to fake pulling a muscle as I turned away to keep from falling down laughing.

    I always figgered him to be some what gutless as proven by the fact that he never again approached me on the job and asked how long?

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  9. #407
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    A couple of weeks ago, I visited my friendly neighborhood sheetmetal expert, and had a small chunk of 16 gauge steel lightly crinked.



    Immediately after that, I had other work calling my attention, and that occupied the last few weeks. Finally, this evening, I had a chance to get back to it.

    The slight bend was so the bottom half would more or less match the angle of the lip of the drip tray, and then straighten up to more or less vertical.



    And, the angle moves the backsplash rearward enough so that the stop rod (not shown here) that goes in the back of the cross slide, won't hit the 'wall'.



    And with that clamped in more or less the right spot, with some old cardboard and some scissors, i was able to piece together the side plate, which will not only protect the pumps and whatnot from swarf, but also acts as a brace/mount for the backsplash.

    The rough, taped mockup gets transferred to a new piece of cardboard (CAD- cardboard Aided Design. I've been using that gag since LONG before the Project Binky guys popularized it ) and then that, too, is cut out and trimmed.



    And of course test-fitted.



    I had to keep in mind being able to actually remove the assembled guard. I'd considered making the side plate wider, with more coverage, and having the two oil pipes pass through holes, having to be assembled after the backsplash was installed.

    Didn't like that idea, so I trimmed it out so that it can be more easily removed. The one remaining sticky point is that one of the two mounting points, using existing drilled and tapped holes, is right behind the upper output tubing. So in order to remove or install the backsplash, that tube will have to be removed.

    Not terribly happy about that part, but neither the tube nor the backsplash will likely be removed very often, so it's not a significant hassle.

    Anyway, that pattern gets transferred to another unbent chunk of 16 gauge, taking a little extra care to make sure all the angles are right, and the features true and square- well, as necessary, of course.



    The appropriate corners and whatnot perforated with a big step drill...



    And then the whole mess bandsawed out.



    Have I mentioned, recently, how useful a vertical bandsaw is?

    That gets smoothed up with various air tools and deburred with a file, and then of course test-fitted.



    The sharp-eyed sorts in the audience might notice the big gap between the new plate and the drip-tray lip. There's a reason for that.

    Those that might be familiar with my work might know that I tend to like my projects and products to have a little flair. I like the idea of them looking good as well as being functional. To that end, I decided to add a little flair to this part as well.

    Using the same bandsaw, I quartered a chunk of 2" exhaust pipe (also 16 ga) and made some wide, rounded corners. Smoothed on the belt grinder, trimmed, and TIG-tacked in place.



    And that, of course, fills that gap back up, so that when the backsplash sheet itself is mounted it'll line up nicely with the drip-tray lip. And that corner, once welded and finished, will look stamped, or at least more factory, rather than a simple MIG-welded square corner.




    More to come!

    Doc.

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    I spent quite a few hours working out how to mount the motor and fwd/rev drum on my old 14" ATW, got an elegant fit in the perfect right places. As nice more capable as the newer 12" is, I still miss the 14 sometimes. The drum switch is just not quite right and the old one had a perfect corner to rest your hand during a long op, the drum just a small hand-jump away...

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    A couple of weeks ago, I visited my friendly neighborhood sheetmetal expert, and had a small chunk of 16 gauge steel lightly crinked.
    Looks a lot like the metal back guard and headstock shields on my old W/S #3 Doc. I did not make them but the person that did, made a real nice job of it. It was set up with oil, no water based suds. Looks like you did a great job, should do well to keep the coolant contained. Appreciate all the nice photos.

  12. #410
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    Looking around, I've seen a bunch of different styles of backsplash- I'm not actually sure I've seen two of the same style.

    Some are clearly shopmade- though usually well done- and some are clearly factory made, with the differences likely being due to various ages and series' of the machines.

    Anyway, the next step here was to come up with a way to mount the back panel to the drip tray, but without welding, or drilling and tapping. Some of the other guards I've seen had a sort of clip on the back, and I figured that was a workable idea.

    I bandsawed some 3" sections of some 2-1/2" x 1/2" flatbar, milled them to a consistent length, and then milled a 1" wide step in each one.



    Each one then got drilled and slotted like so.



    A little corner rounding, a little filing, a trip to the deburring wheel, and we have four clamping bars.



    I wanted some stubby carriage bolts, but nobody carried short ones. I was forced to buy both stainless and from Homey-Dee, so I filed and sanded off that stupid HD SKU marking.



    I then drilled four holes in the bent panel, and channeling my inner Clickspring, filed them square to fit the carriage bolts.



    The clamps fit like so and hold remarkably solidly.



    I then rolled the TIG over and tacked the back panel to the previously-made end panel.



    Moving everything back over to the welding table, I slowly skip-stitched all the seams, giving it ample time to cool down between runs.



    I got pretty decent penetration- without burning through- though there are a couple spots I'll have to touch up.



    Et voila`! Once I've finished up the rest- which is still a bit up in the air- I'll grind it smooth.



    Back in place, and it still fits perfectly.



    Not yet entirely sure what I'm going to do with the top edge.



    It needs at least a flange of some sort, to keep the unsupported upper right corner from flapping. Not sure if I want to try and brake a bend into it, or weld a second piece on. I may also cut it down (or bend it down) to about the same level as the top of the headstock.

    Still ponderin', but more to come.

    Doc.

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    Slot some tubing and slip it over the edge. Gives you some stiffness and rounds over the edge to prevent you from cutting yourself on it.

    Harold

  14. #412
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    That's something I hadn't thought of... though I'm not sure I'm looking for a beaded edge like that.

    I have some 10 ga strapping, I may just trim it down and weld a flange to it.

    Doc.

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    The round tube is what they did on the Chip pan for my Sidney. Looks very nice, is strong, and keeps one from hurting themselves. I'd say it's 3/8-1/2". 100% agreed with Harold, good call.

  16. #414
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    Now that the backsplash is mostly fitted, and as such there's less need for me to have free access to the back of the machine, I could finally get it moved away from the garage door and up against the wall- which was pretty much the last open spot I had for any kind of big mostly-immobile object.

    For the past almost five months, the lathe has sat more or less right here, just inside the garage door, which was as far as my neighbor with the 966 could reach with the forks.



    My usual routine for this kind of project is to dismantle the machine wherever it lands, and as I clean and repaint, I then reassemble it in the new location. This time, I never broke the machine down entirely- though there were certainly times there was a lot less weight to it.

    I was loaned a set of 20K-capacity skates, so this time I wasn't so worried.

    After about an hour of cleaning, sorting and general putting-away, I had enough room that with some hired help- and about another hour- we had the beast slid up alongside the wall, and the shaper tucked up into the corner.



    It may wind up a slight bit closer, I have to get the backsplash back in place, and see about access to things like the oil pumps and whatnot. But either way, it certainly opens my floor back up quite a bit.

    And, for image #666 of this build, a Photo of the Beast:



    Obviously the backsplash has to go back on, and as I mentioned earlier, I may wind up making some cabinets or storage boxes that roll under the center and right-hand end in order to store collets and tools. I may make a small collet rack to go on the wall, to hold the common or often-used ones, rather than the whole collection.

    Might have to get some work mat, too, against the inevitable oil spray.

    Anyway, still more to come, but we're getting there!

    Doc.

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  18. #415
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    After some careful meditation and various pleas to the gods for wisdom, I formulated a plan. Might not be a great plan, but at least it was a plan.

    First, I marked the backsplash at roughly the level of the top of the headstock, then marked off a second line 3/4" from that. The top section then got trimmed off with my trusty electric shear.



    I don't happen to own a brake, but I have some steel sawhorses, some angle iron and a bunch of clamps.



    Once suitably clamped, the edge can be worked down gradually with a big hammer and a chunk of wood.



    After just a few minutes, we have a freshly flanged edge. It's not a great bend, but it does the job.



    Stupidly, I'd forgotten to pre-trim the corner, so I did that now, to give it a little of that flair.



    The problem there was that left a much bigger gap than I was hoping for, or that a TIG likes. But with perseverance and a healthy supply of curse words, I got it welded up and ground smooth. (It's actually smoother than it looks.)



    On the bent end, I had to slit the metal and bend the two sections separately. And then, to try and keep welding the cut from drawing the two halves back together, I fitted a small bit on the backside, and used the spot-welder to tack it in place.



    Then I could carefully weld the seam.



    It still needs one more bit of welding and a lick of finish-grinding before I can paint it, but it's almost done!



    And a quick test-fit shows that it's considerably less floppy than before. The flange stiffens the outer corner nicely.



    With a little luck, I can install it proper this weekend!

    Doc.

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    And done! (Again. )

    The last part to attend to was the corner up by the electrical conduit. I couldn't bend a flange here, but could add one. I took the strip I'd cut off earlier, and snipped a short 3/4" wide section.



    A little tweaking, finagling and various manhandling later, we get this shiny new flange:



    That gets TIGged into place...



    And then the final bit is fitted, trimmed, clamped...



    And welded.



    That makes the entire assembly surprisingly non-floppy. It's a considerable improvement over the original flat material.

    And that's it! Done!



    Well, almost. After test fitting, I realized I hadn't taken into account the curvature of the electrical conduit, and had to do a little adjusting to the shiny new flange. With a torch and a hammer.



    (You can also see a corner of the rubber work mat I picked up for it.)

    That adjustment took care of the interference nicely, the whole assembly now fits perfectly, and is suitably rigid. I still need to do some finish-grinding before I can paint, but that won't take long.



    And there she is, fitted and installed. Should keep control of some of the oil spray, and I figure a chuck guard fitted from just above the spindle, that can be adjusted to track the workpiece (and clear tools as necessary) will take care of most of the rest.



    We are finally damn near fully operational!

    Doc.

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    obviously one should never underestimate perseverance and a healthy supply of curse words... nice work as usual Doc, your attention to the small details is what makes your work so interesting, and I learn something most every time I look at your posts. Thanks, jim

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  22. #418
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    A rather serious drawback to filling one's shop with machine tools, is that proper steel fabrication is, as they say, contraindicated. Using a grinder to spray grit and metal dust all over ones' freshly-rebuilt and well-oiled lathes is not an ideal situation.

    It's also one I don't have much choice of, as I make my living with the machine tools. The fabrication is just a hobby, or at best, support for said machines.

    In the summertime, not a big problem. I'll pop open the doors, set up the sawhorses and cut, grind, plaz and weld to my heart's content.

    But this is Alaska. Said summer is just under fifty-six minutes long. It's been full winter for over two months now. And today it was snowing again.

    So I set up my pop-up tent thingy and the sawhorses, and worked outside, like some kind of caveman.



    My air tools literally kept freezing up. Not from moisture in the air- I have good traps- but just from the cold plus the additional cooling of the air as the pressure is released. I'd have to periodically take them inside to defrost.

    Besides which, it was heavily overcast- the picture doesn't really show how dark it was. That bright spot in the center is a droplight so I could see what I was working on.

    But, I persevered. I groused a lot, sure, but I persevered.

    The seams didn't come out Ron Covell smooth, but they're not bad. I suppose I could have wiped some spot putty or something on some of the pits, but hey, it's just a lathe backsplash, not a show car.

    Anyway, I finished it up, and got 'er back inside. Warmed up, wiped down with some degreaser, and given a quick lick of self-etching primer.



    Once that had had a chance to dry, I threw the first coat of enamel at it.



    And, as per SOP, tomorrow I'll give it a second coat, and Monday or maybe Tuesday, I'll give it a final install.

    ... And I just realized I'd forgotten to paint the clamping blocks. Well, I can still get that done this evening... Be right back.

    Doc.

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  24. #419
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    Can you put together a booth inside the shop to grind in? Maybe a few shower curtains or tarps attached to your pop up tent? I don't think I'd be willing to brave the cold that long..

    You might also throw some sheets over the machine tools when not in use.

    I just picked up 2 W&S turret lathes, a #1 Electrospindle and a 3A. I still have to power them up and assess them, hopefully they are good to go after cleaning. Lots to learn on the tooling and accessories for sure.

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    Alaskan's I am told are a hardier breed than the rest of us. They are known to work out in 50 below weather in nothing but shorts and a tee shirt and think nothing of it.(of course, this is in the summer when it is not as cold as in the winter...)


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