Hendey 14x6 #26230
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  1. #1
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    Default Hendey 14x6 #26230

    Hello, new member from Ct.
    I recently inherited a Hendey 14x6 lathe and want to learn more about its history, use, and how to disassemble the spindle as it’s currently suffering from Hendeyitous. The serial number is 26230.
    All comments appreciated!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 776d1477-486e-429d-85de-b9e8c10e05e9.jpg  

  2. #2
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    Usual handy stuff related to spindle
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails spindle-removal-instruct.jpg   spindle-alphas.jpg   list.jpg   front-detail.jpg   all-parts.jpg  


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  4. #3
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    Default Thanks!

    That is very helpful, thank you John!

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChasCt View Post
    That is very helpful, thank you John!
    You are certainly welcome

    The shimming scheme is known to work. There are also members that advocate no shimming, just the use of TIMESAVER compound - an old time system used for ages in fitting automotive Babbitt engine bearings

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  7. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    You are certainly welcome

    The shimming scheme is known to work. There are also members that advocate no shimming, just the use of TIMESAVER compound - an old time system used for ages in fitting automotive Babbitt engine bearings
    Thank you John.

    A little back ground on the lathe.
    My grandfather purchased this Hendey back in the late 80’s from a neighbor that was retiring and moving south. It’s been sitting inside unused since the early 90’s.
    The only experience I have using a metal lathe dates back 35 years to high school shop class and a few times on this Hendey lathe about 30 years ago. At the time I knew most of what the controls and levers were for, but have to learn everything all over.
    First of all, besides being a 14x6, what is this machine called, a tie bar, cone head or does it have another name I can use to search for specific information on it, such as a users manual?
    I will have to check out that timesaver compound. Can copper shim stock be used for shiming the thrust washer?
    I would love to know what year this was built as well as where it spent most of its life.
    Thank you for the comment!

  8. #6
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    Lots of them are just Cone Heads, but as near as I know, Hendey made the only tie bar cone heads (on edit - there are a few Hendey-look-alikes out there but I can't think of a name)

    Manual scan may be of use. Thanks to Greg Menke for hosting this for me.

    http://pounceatron.dreamhosters.com/...dey-manual.pdf

    As far as general knowledge, South Bend put out many editions such as this from 1927

    http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/1617/5795.pdf

    For down the road some on the learning curve, my old write up on Hendey's "threading system" / lead screw reverse starts at post #17 in the thread linked below

    Hendey lathe "emergency"!

    Member hendeyman may find time to stop by and comment on your Hendey's history. I would imagine that it is from the mid nineteen-twenties
    Last edited by johnoder; 09-15-2018 at 11:22 AM.

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  10. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    Lots of them are just Cone Heads, but as near as I know, Hendey made the only tie bar cone heads (on edit - there are a few Hendey-look-alikes out there but I can't think of a name)

    Manual scan may be of use. Thanks to Greg Menke for hosting this for me.

    http://pounceatron.dreamhosters.com/...dey-manual.pdf

    As far as general knowledge, South Bend put out many editions such as this from 1927

    http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/1617/5795.pdf

    For down the road some on the learning curve, my old write up on Hendey's "threading system" / lead screw reverse starts at post #17 in the thread linked below

    Hendey lathe "emergency"!

    Member hendeyman may find time to stop by and comment on your Hendey's history. I would imagine that it is from the mid nineteen-twenties
    Oh sweet, just what I need, many thanks John!
    If Hendeyman gets a chance, it would be be much appreciated!

  11. #8
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    Default 👍🏻👍🏻

    Wow, this helps, thanks John!
    Although I haven’t had time to start working on it, I intend to disassemble the spindle head & clean everything up. It also needs either a new belt or the old one re-laced, the motor installed and probably leveling.

    If Hendeyman does have a chance, I’d really appreciate knowing the year it was made and where it lived or anything else that is available.

    Thanks
    Charlie


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