Hendey Tool & Gage Restoration - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 82
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    96
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    26

    Default

    Update. I have finally gotten some time to start working on the Hendey. I had been working on some other projects at the time, and I had decided to force myself to finish them before starting this one. Anyways I have started on the apron, saddle, and cross slide.

    Overall the machine is in decent shape. The wear is not too bad, however it looks like it has been maintained by an impatient bonehead. Many parts have been scarred by a hammer or a prybar. For example, the shaft end on the compound feed knob rides in a bore in the compound housing. It had been hammered and mushroomed, and forced back together, and left completely seized.

    The worst problem is related to the broken teeth on the pinion, which I now think occurred due to a malfunction with the half-nut lockout. How is the lockout rod supposed to work? I can see that when the halfnuts are engaged, the rod pushes towards the clutch cone. But how does this prevent the clutch from being tightened? In my case it looks like the halfnuts were engaged, the clutch was tightened anyways. The lockout rod accomplished nothing other than chowdering the gear teeth on the cone, which in turn chowdered the teeth on the mating gear. And the pinion teeth broke anyways.

    I see what looks like a key in the clutch cone, but it has been filed smooth. There is no keyway in the bronze bushing that this rides in. Should there be? Maybe this bushing was replaced, incorrectly, and maybe this would explain the lockout failure as well.

    A couple other questions:

    1. How do the cross slide and compound feed screws get lubricated?
    2. Are the worms grease or oil lubricated? I thought they were grease lubed, but the bracket they mount in looks like it could function as an oil reservoir.

    img-0051.jpg
    img-0053.jpg
    Last edited by jwearing; 01-31-2019 at 07:59 PM.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    96
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    26

    Default

    Pretty sure there was a grease zerk on the end of this shaft. It must have broken off, and the guy filed it smooth. Nice work. <sigh>

    img-0055.jpg

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Utah
    Posts
    239
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    50
    Likes (Received)
    68

    Default

    jwearing, based on my experience with my 2 Hendeys, I'd suspect that was a ball oiler rather than a grease zerk. I haven't encountered any grease zerks on my 1910 cone head or my 1943 gearhead. Just a thought.

    Craig

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    96
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    26

    Default

    These Tool & Gage lathes are oddballs, grease lubrication throughout. There are a couple oilers here and there but 90% of the lube points are grease zerks.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    96
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    26

    Default

    Check out the end of the pinion shaft. When I removed it I thought it was intentionally eccentric for backlash adjustment. Now I realize that it was just bent from the tooth-breaking incident. The steel is pretty hard, I guess those teeth can hold quite a lot of torque.

    Oh, and the guy removed the grease zerk from this shaft as well. I hope he didn't screw with the rest of the lathe.

    img-0063.jpg

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    BC Canada
    Posts
    438
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    9

    Default

    My Holbrook came with Zerks throughout, but they are all oiling points, so I would try to get hold of a lube chart before going ahead and using grease on your Hendey.

  7. Likes Hopefuldave liked this post
  8. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    1,419
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    8
    Likes (Received)
    97

    Default

    yes a grease zerk is used for oiling on many machines

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    96
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    26

    Default

    Man, owning this machine is going to be great, I get to have this conversation over and over.

  10. Likes Doozer, Hopefuldave liked this post
  11. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    96
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    26

    Default

    Not much progress lately, I have been busy with other things. However I have been researching the grease vs oil issue. I ordered the manual including lube chart from Hendeyman, and it does clearly state "grease" for most of the lube points. However it is odd that the worms in the apron sit in an oil reservoir. On the other hand, I haven't found any felt wicks, and it seems like it wouldn't hold oil for long.

    Searching yielded a lot of results from member Disaster-Area, so I messaged him. He reply was really informational, and I wanted to post it publicly for reference: (Thanks Disaster Area!)



    Way too much information on Grease, Oil, and the Hendey T&G:


    Grease. Ugh. The only bad thing about the T&G. Grease is what is what Hendey specified.
    When I researched the lathe, as far as I can tell, NLGI #1 is the correct grade of grease (which is a more 'watery' grease than #2, it has more oil in the grease).
    It is hard to find #1 (or I could not find it), there is a #1.5 (Mobil electric motor grease? don't recall).

    I may have found one grease without EP, but I think it was #2 (McMaster Carr, etc as source).


    However, the most important thing is:

    When the designed the lathe (1935 - 1939, or so), and built the lathe (1940), the grease made then did not include "EP" (Extreme pressure) additives.

    Grease has changed a lot since 1940. Today grease is much better, but it almost always has EP additives.
    You do not want EP in your grease, EP additives destroy bronze . Your worm gears that for longitudinal, and cross feed are bronze.

    ASTM test D-4048, tests copper strips (bronze has copper in it), in oils for corrosion. Mobil DTE30 result is 'slight tarnish' 1B (see Mobil DTE30 tests).
    Most other alemite fittings on this lathe, ends up lubrication bronze bearing, e.g. gears, change gears, head stock (but not: the 4 at spindle - grease the ABEC7 bearings = steel only).

    For example, Mobil steam cylinder oil (viscous , almost a grease, 600 weight) is what was 'Gargoyle' brand steam cylinder oil (Mobil bought the company).

    This 600W oil does NOT have EP additives. It has multiple applications, other than steam engines, i.e. gearboxes that have bronze worm gears.
    Manufacturers of gearboxes that have bronze worm gears warn you about EP, and one specified 600W, because it does not have EP.


    What I initially did:

    Setup a grease gun to use Mobil DTE 30 oil. It is an oil for dynamo, turbine and engines, that does not have EP additives (IIRC).

    Ended up with a lot of oil spilled (total loss type system).

    I then changed to a NLGI #1.5 grease (that did not have EP additives ) If i recall correctly - i think it was a Mobil red electric motor grease (purchased from ENCO).

    This was a mistake. My bronze feed gears have heavy wear, partly from prior user, partly from EP.

    I have to replace the worm gears - which is problem, as Hendeyman is somewhat retired.

    Also - the carriage now is probably packed with the grease soaps (the non oil binder in grease, after all the oil drains out of the grease), and needs cleaning, ugh.
    I should have stayed with oil lube.


    Notes:

    When I used oil on the alemite fittings, I had a grease gun, with flexible hose. I kept the ends upward (to prevent oil spilling out), but was leaky.
    I added oil to the grease gun tube end, only when I oiled the lathe (obtaining a better grease gun for oil, or mod of grease gun is a better way).

    Alemite makes a grease gun that is designed for oil (not grease), but is expensive.

    ALEMITE Heavy Duty Oil Guns | An SKF Group Brand
    European manufacturers either: make a grease gun designed for oil (Gedore, or HAZET , etc), or make a really good oil can, or both.

    How I lubricate the spindle bearings:

    I looked at how surface grinders, using high quality bearings are lubricated/serviced. Some use Kluber Isoflex (German grease, Barium based, use gloves since a proven carcinogen),

    as a 'one time lube', that is, when installing the bearings, lube the bearings to 20-30% fill, with a very high quality grease, seal the bearings within the surface grinder,
    and that is the 'one time lube' -run the machine without adding any grease until the bearings fail.

    I applied this to my lathe when I installed new bearings on the Spindle.
    I obtained Kluber Isoflex from NH, lubed the 4 bearings (2 on left side, 2 Fafnir on right side of head stock) with a 30% fill, and left them as a 'lifetime lube'.

    Have run machine about 12 years like that without any problem that I am aware of. I have not added any grease to these 4 bearings, over the last 12 years.

    (I have a different unrelated problem on the spindle: the tube that separates the 2 Fafnir angular contact bearings is of shorter length than it should be - my bearings do not heat up at all,

    when adjusting these bearings, by tightening, you tighten a little, check the temperature of the bearings, and either tighten more, or less depending on bearing temperature. I was not able to heat up the
    bearings much, therefore they are too loose. I can not tighten any more, therefore the tube is too small I think.)

    What i use to lubricate spindle: Kluber Isoflex (#15?). There is a company in NH that sells a small amount (30cc?) for $50 (10 years ago),
    which is enough for the 4 bearings (2 roller on left 2 Fafnir to right) - for a 30% fill. These bearings are not filled like vehicle wheel bearings, or u-joints (100% fill),
    these high quality bearings require some space for the grease to move around (read: Barden Bearing, and Fafnir bearing manuals).
    I can not find a link, that I once had at Barden, which explained how to grease, and install angular contact bearings.



    More notes:
    On the head stock, on the left hand side at the gears, there is cap labelled 'oil'. Lifting the cap exposes an alemite fitting. This MUST be oiled.

    I did grease it, it overheated, wore out the bronze bearing, and I had to re-bush it.

    Some (perhaps) useful links:

    5 Common Lubrication Problems and How to Fix Them

    https://www.timken.com/wp-content/up...-Catalog-1.pdf

    http://www.baleromex.com/catalogos/C...-FAFNIR-SP.pdf

    barden bearings, read preload of precision bearing:

    https://www.bardenbearings.com/remot...ucts_us_en.pdf

    pg 89, preload, pg 96 grease for angular contact bearings(20-30% fill for angular bearings):

    https://www.bardenbearings.co.uk/res...gue-lo-res.pdf

  12. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Maryland- USA
    Posts
    3,400
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1950
    Likes (Received)
    2152

    Default

    My Hendey T&G has grease Zerks everywhere including apron.
    1939 machine- I can offer help is you need anything measured etc
    Great lathe btw- worth messing with to get running.

  13. #31
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    ventura,ca.usa
    Posts
    368
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    51

    Default

    I for one would like to see more pictures of your project...(I don't have a Hendey, but I enjoy restoration /refurb projects) Jim

  14. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    1,301
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    9
    Likes (Received)
    512

    Default

    jwearing, thanks for posting that and thanks to DisasterArea for writing it.

  15. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    elfrida arizona usa
    Posts
    1,313
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    417

    Default

    jwearing:

    The lubrication information supplied with the T&G lathe has always been at odds with the standard Hendey practice. Prior to the introduction of this lathe in 1939, all Hendey lathes were essentially oil lubrication. My 1894 Cone Head uses oil as does all of my
    Geared Heads. Starting in the late twenties, Hendey did numerous experiments with High Speed Headstocks (2000+ RPM). With the intro-
    duction of the No.1 High Speed in the early thirties, oil was still the preferred lubricant. The speed range of the No.1 High Speed
    and the T&G lathe are similar, so why change from oil to grease. It only took a little over three years to learn that that was a big
    mistake. By 1942, Both the No.1 High Speeds and the T&Gs were being worked 24/7 and the problems were beginning to show. The No.1s at
    Norden were running cool, no problems, but the same could not be said for the T&Gs. The Heasstocks were getting excessively hot and
    causing production problems. The Chief Engineer from New Departure Bearings conducted extensive tests and concluded that the heating
    problems were caused by the use of grease instead of oil. Once the change was made, no more heating problems were reported.

    I only use oil in my lathes, for all applications and I have warned my customers over the years about using it in the aprons. As I
    posted several years ago, our local cannery didn't get the memo. Since they are located about twenty miles north of the Mexican border,
    they employ a number of Mexican mechanics. When they noticed that the Apron Handwheel was acting a bit stiff, it was only logical to
    assume that it needed a lube job. They were unaware that the Apron was low on oil and the the Apron contained a cam operated oil pump
    that supplied all of the bearings and Cross Slide surfaces with oil. So, out came the grease gun and the whole Apron was converted into
    a cream puff with any escaping grease packed back in with a putty. Nothing was going to escape on their watch. Everything worked for
    about a month and then the Apron locked up. The "master" mechanics were back in Mexico and the owner of the cannery, an old friend,
    asked me to take a look since I normally did all of the service work on the machine shop equipment. It didn't take long to find the
    problem, but it took about a month to make and fit new parts. As Disaster Area mentioned in his post, the additives in the grease do
    react with the bronze bushings and worm gears, destroying them. About 75% of the parts had to be replaced. What the chemicals didn't
    damage, galling did because of a lack of lubrication.

    Hendeyman

  16. Likes jwearing, M.B. Naegle liked this post
  17. #34
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    96
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    26

    Default

    More from Disaster Area:

    (Sorry for the long posts but I am finding this very useful and want to share with everyone else)

    Yes, its OK to post anything I write. Please encourage anyone who knows more than I, to correct anything that I wrote (I am not an engineer/tribologist).
    The more information the other T&G owners have, the better.

    Which alemite fittings can be greased, and which should be oiled:
    I will email tomorrow (I have to look at the lathe for this)


    Converting to 'lifetime lubricated from bearing manufacturer;

    1. Spindle bearings can be 1x greased using kluber isoflex.

    2. Lead screw and Feed rod casting at the tail stock end of the lathe - can be replaced with double sealed, or double shielded bearings for lifetime lube from factory.

    3. Twin disk clutch shafts, on the shafts at the bottom of the lathe - you can use double shielded.

    The above areas can use lifetime lube.
    *2/4 fittings at back of lathe adjacent to draw tube storage - I have to look at tomorrow, grease might be OK here.
    All other alemite fittings, lead to bronze bearings.

    The lead screw, and that feed rod that end in the casting at the tail stock end of the lathe - I installed doubled sealed bearings.

    The original bearings (2 to 4 per shaft - there were more bearings there than I expected), did not have shields, to allow passage of grease through all the bearings.

    I installed new bearings, as double sealed, and regarded as 'greased for life, by the factory', and do not grease them.

    If they are a problem, I will replace them. They have run 12 years without any problems.

    The quick change gear box has multiple alemite fittings at the bottom. The gear box has a mix of (mostly) single shielded ball bearings, and bronze bearings.

    One or 2 may have been open bearing (no shields on either side).
    There is a labyrinth passage of grease from the alemite fitting through a single shielded bearing though passages to either a bronze bearing, or another ball bearing.

    The single shield allows passage of grease throughout the labyrinth.
    Therefore, you cannot use double shielded bearings, because the bronze bearings would not get the lubricant that they need.

    The head stock gears alemite fittings, exposed when lifting the cast aluminum plate are bronze bearings, with one exception:

    If you stand at the head stock end of the lathe, perpendicular to the spindle, the alemite fittings on the right hand side lubricate the quick change gearbox - using the labyrinth passages again.


    Double sealed vs double shielded bearings:

    Shielded bearings have 2 metallic plates protecting the bearings from chips from the lathe.

    Sealed bearings have 2 rubber or plastic plates protecting the bearings from (mostly) dust.

    Sealed bearings retain the grease better than shielded bearings.

    Shielded bearings protect the bearings from metallic bits (chips).


    To make a single shielded, or single sealed bearing from a double sealed or double shielded bearing:

    Jam a hook pick into one of the 2 seals, and lever/pull it out (carefully tap it in with a hammer, without damaging the race/bearing).

    Most original bearings on the T&G lathe are single shielded bearings, with a felt wiper (sealed bearings may not have existed at that time, 1940).
    They are single shielded, to allow passage of grease (or oil) through the bearing, to either an adjacent bearing, or a labyrinth passage to a different bearing.
    Alemite fittings.
    If the fitting leads to a bronze bearing, or wormgear, it should not be greased, only oiled.
    If the fitting leads to a ball bearing only, it can be oiled or greased (lifetime lube of grease is better choice).
    Qty, Location, description, whether to grease, or oil.

    2 - Back of lathe, near clamp for draw tube, Linkage that controls change of speed (back gears, direct drive), can be greased.
    2 - Top of gears, Remove plate labelled 'Oil', to expose 2 fittings, Oil only!
    2 - Top of head stock, Spindle bearings, grease (or kluber isoflex)

    1 - 2" below plate labelled "1st Back gear", leads to gears that changes speed range from back gear to direct drive, bronze bearings, oil
    0 - Change gear top, Flat head screw labelled 'oil', oil

    3 - Right side of quick change gear:

    Upper fitting: Lubricates left end of threading shaft, grease or oil
    Middle: Gears that change from threading to power feed, bronze bearings, oil
    Lower: Lubricates left end of feed rod, grease or oil
    At bottom of quick change gear, there are 4 fittings:

    1 - Left hand side beneath 'A' plate, lubricates change gear bearings (some are bronze), oil

    3 - Right hand side, lubricates change gears, bronze and ball bearings, oil
    At the Carriage, there are 10 fittings and many bronze parts and gears, all should be oiled:

    2 - left hand side, oil
    1 - longitudinal hand wheel, oil
    1 - right of longitudinal hand wheel, oil
    1 - beneath cross feed dial, oil
    2 - longitudinal feed locking knob, oil
    2 - cross feed locking knob, oil
    1 - threading lever, oil
    The right hand side of the lathe bed, tail stock end are 2 fittings in a cast iron block:

    1 - upper, threading rod, right hand side, grease (or install new 'lifetime lube' bearings)

    1 - lower, feed rod, right hand side, grease (or install new 'lifetime lube' bearings).

    At the left of lathe bed, is an aluminum plate, lift off to expose change gears. 9 fittings:

    5 - at the top, in a row, lead to gears with bronze bearings, oil

    1 - below the top, one gear has a protruding fitting, bronze bearing, oil

    1- a little lower, perpendicular to above fitting, bronze bearing, oil

    2 - at the lower right hand side, leads to quick change gears, bronze bearings, oil


    That's a lot of fittings, some have ball bearings only, others bronze bearings

  18. #35
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    96
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    26

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Trboatworks View Post
    1939 machine- I can offer help is you need anything measured etc
    Thanks! I am going to take you up on that -- you might regret offering

    Quote Originally Posted by hendeyman View Post
    The Chief Engineer from New Departure Bearings conducted extensive tests and concluded that the heating
    problems were caused by the use of grease instead of oil. Once the change was made, no more heating problems were reported.
    Thanks, you guys have convinced me.

    Regarding oil in the headstock, and in general: Are any modifications required? I.E., felts, seals?

  19. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Maryland- USA
    Posts
    3,400
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1950
    Likes (Received)
    2152

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jwearing View Post
    Thanks! I am going to take you up on that -- you might regret offering



    Thanks, you guys have convinced me.

    Regarding oil in the headstock, and in general: Are any modifications required? I.E., felts, seals?
    No problem- on grease type as explored by Disaster above- I remember climbing through everything available on ‘correct’ at the time I rebuilt the lathe and found a Lubriplate series of NLGI #1 which is what I use today.
    My lathe has the original PIV drive- in the course of the rebuild I tore down the drive,pulled every shaft and bearing below the apron and replaced all the bearings.
    I also ran down the oil for the drive and landed on a specific product from Lubriplate as well.

    I would offer that the grease/heat issue is addressing the spindle bearings. These are supplied (on my lathe as least) with Zerks fittings.
    I would say little wonder they run hot if pumped full.
    I replaced the spindle bearings on my lathe and ‘lubed for life’ with a specified Kluber in specified amount.
    No issues.
    I vaguely remember that the heat issue was related to a speed upgrade in the BC version of the lathe.
    I would offer that properly greased headstock bearings will not overheat in the use the lathe will see in service.
    I don’t know if there is a valid argument to change to a oil lube.

    Call, write, come visit.
    My poor old T&G seems to have seen war service then as a tool room lathe in a toy factory in CT, they as a home lathe by the owner of a machine shop to work on tractor parts and now standing in my marine repair shop..
    I can’t say how worn out it is as I never measured the bed.
    I can make good parts and the lathe is a absolute joy to use.

    The first thread I ever cut on a lathe was a double start acme for the T&G’s cross.
    The Hendey held my hand as it were and helped me get it done.

    a448558e-16a2-453b-94f2-616032c4db95.jpg 41710e2c-3ae4-4e43-a7ea-42658c40f88b.jpg

    Also a first for me- a new shaft for one of the shop bandsaws turned on the Hendey using the taper attachment:

    e04d82fe-75ab-47fa-aec5-ba85bc8eaa42.jpg

    For a rank amateur on the lathe I managed two bearing fits and the taper and got the heavy drive wheel to spin perfectly true.
    The Hendey will do the work.

    A large bushing for a piece of yard equipment here with 1/16” clear over the cross slide:

    048b6f57-2503-45c3-887e-5ac81c5d4c9c.jpg

    I can’t stand as a final word on the Hendey T&G- I am a hack.
    But the lathe does stand in use in my shop and I set to rights those things which needed attention.

    3de2cd0f-77d2-4f60-abef-931bbf55387a.jpg

    Edit- I think it can go without saying, Hendeyman documentation of the service history of this lathe trumps mine though in my experience I see absolutely no heat issue with greased headstock bearings in my T&G.

    And...
    If you wish to read for entertainments sake- here is a bloody fight I went through early in my ownership of the T&G.
    I had forgotten the detail- whew- that was a fight both to define the problem and to set it to rights...:

    I managed to bend my spindle- interested in any approaches to git 'er straight
    Last edited by Trboatworks; 05-05-2019 at 09:56 AM.

  20. #37
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    96
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    26

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jmm03 View Post
    I for one would like to see more pictures of your project...(I don't have a Hendey, but I enjoy restoration /refurb projects) Jim
    Alright, I should post an update anyways.

    I haven't really done much with it, considering I bought it 6 months ago. At the time I was working on some other projects, I got into the Hendey in January but then I started a new job in February. Between the job and my 2-year old kid, I get about 4 hours per week to do anything fun.

    First up I tackled the taper attachment. This was kind of a warm-up round. I don't have a before picture, but it was pretty heavily rusted. I scraped with a razor blade and dunked it in evaporust.
    img-0333.jpg

    Next up was the tailstock. It was siezed up tight from rust. I eventually got it open and cleaned it up. Still two problems: the clamp rod is bent, and the lever is broken. Haven't tried to bend the rod yet, don't know how hard it is. And it looks like the lever was already broken and welded once, it looks simple enough and I will try to just fab a new one.
    img-0334.jpg
    img-0337.jpg

    The saddle, cross slide, and compound weren't too bad. Except the shaft on the compound knob had been hammered and mushroomed a bit, and pressed back into the housing. It was completely siezed up. Also it had been crashed into the chuck in a few places, I can't put the missing metal back, but I smoothed out the high spots and it is at least usable again.
    img-0335.jpg

    Haven't started the gearbox yet, it will be next.
    img-0336.jpg

  21. #38
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    96
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    26

    Default

    The apron is where most of my problems are. Here is how it sits today:
    img-0338.jpg

    Here is the first problem. The bronze bushing underneath the longitudinal clutch knob is non-original. I'm fairly sure that this should be two pieces, an externally threaded sleeve and an internally threaded collar. When the clutch is tightened, it pulls the sleeve outwards and engages the interlock rod. I think that this mechanism was replaced, incorrectly, which led to the interlock being defeated, which led to the chewed up gears and my broken pinion.
    img-0339.jpg

    Here's a shot of the inside (I figured I would take it apart to clean up the EP grease anyways). In my opinion the worm gears are not bad.
    img-0341.jpg
    img-0342.jpg

    One more casualty of the sloppy maintenance. My fingers point to the damaged teeth.
    img-0343.jpg

  22. #39
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Maryland- USA
    Posts
    3,400
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1950
    Likes (Received)
    2152

    Default

    Op- I replied to pm- call me.

    I believe your parts are correct?
    Check- the bronze part you are holding is two parts.
    Threaded together- reverse thread.

    Mine are made of steel:

    23e94f7e-1c4d-4982-9880-4a48e2f67e76.jpg

    The reverse thread acts to adjust the length of the tube and hence the friction cone engagement.
    It is my understanding that there was a rapid evolution of material types in the T&G apron components.
    I would not be surprised that your parts are in fact original.

  23. #40
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    96
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    26

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Trboatworks View Post
    Op- I replied to pm- call me.

    I believe your parts are correct?
    Check- the bronze part you are holding is two parts.
    Threaded together- reverse thread.

    Mine are made of steel:

    23e94f7e-1c4d-4982-9880-4a48e2f67e76.jpg

    The reverse thread acts to adjust the length of the tube and hence the friction cone engagement.
    It is my understanding that there was a rapid evolution of material types in the T&G apron components.
    I would not be surprised that your parts are in fact original.
    Thanks for taking the time today. And thanks for the photo!

    Mine is definitely one piece. Also there is no keyway on the inner cylinder, and no set screw on the outer cylinder.

    Is that a spline on the end of the inner cylinder? Or just grease marks from the adjacent gear? I was expecting a radial groove there instead of a spline. I am pretty confused about how this part engages the interlock rod.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •