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  1. #41
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    Following this thread.
    Fellow T&G owner.

    -Doozer

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    Concerning the bent/broken tail-stock lock: A lot of those on lathes in general get abused as they are not adjusted correctly letting the tail-stock slip when drilling, so rather than tightening them up, they get hammered on or otherwise. Tail-stock will also slip if your drilling a big hole with a dull bit (but IMO any drill over 5/8" is better mounted on the tool post). That said, you probably could braze/weld your old lever back together and get many more years out of it.

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    T&G'ers: Have any of you guys disassembled the rocker arm in your gearbox? Mine has Oilite bushings, are these original?

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    I just ordered a tube of Lubriplate 1241. It is an NLGI 1 grease with a copper corrosion rating of 1A:
    https://www.lubriplate.com/Lubriplat...240_Series.pdf

    I will probably pick up a tube of the Kluber stuff for the spindle, and I still plan to run oil in certain locations like the worm in the apron, etc. Also I'll switch to sealed ball bearings in all locations where they are easily accessible for replacement.

  5. #45
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    That's more like it:

    gearbox.jpg

    No major problems in the gearbox. A couple gears were showing some wear, but not bad enough to replace. The key on the cone gear set was distorted under one of the gears -- I'm guessing from the same crash that broke the pinion. The gear itself looked ok, and the key was easy to replace.

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    Some more progress to report. I've finished the assembly with the gears to the rear of the headstock. It all looked pretty good, with the exception of a few bushings that had to be replaced. The worst was the assembly with the pulley in the back, I had to turn the shaft down a bit and cut new bushings. Seems like this is a common problem.

    Before:
    rear_head1.jpg
    rear_head2.jpg

    After:
    rear_head3.jpg

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  8. #47
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    I am surprized a lathe of that quality uses bushings instead of some kind of rolling element bearings.

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    Quote Originally Posted by quasi View Post
    I am surprized a lathe of that quality uses bushings instead of some kind of rolling element bearings.
    The gearbox and underdrive use mostly ball bearings. I don't mind the bronze, but I was a bit surprised to find them here where the speeds are high. But 80 years later and most of them are just fine, I guess Hendey knew what they were doing. (...except for that little bracket with the pulley...)

  10. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwearing View Post
    The gearbox and underdrive use mostly ball bearings. I don't mind the bronze, but I was a bit surprised to find them here where the speeds are high. But 80 years later and most of them are just fine, I guess Hendey knew what they were doing. (...except for that little bracket with the pulley...)
    Hendy certainly knew what they were doing, there must be a reason they used them.

  11. #50
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    Regarding the V-belt pulley that supplies spindle power for the feeds...
    My bronze bushing was worn also. All the rest were in good shape. My guess is belt tension killed it.
    It is pretty short lengthwise for a bushing with that amount of belt sideload, I guess a bit under designed. I am still working on mine. I was thinking a needle bearing might fit, but the shaft would need to be hard to run a needle on it. Maybe I can retrofit a piece of Thompson 60 case and make it work. I need to look at it again.
    Actually I was thinking of changing the belt from being driven from the spindle, to being driven externally by a separate motor, affixed to the back of the headstock. My plan is to cut a 1" slice out of that particular casting that you have pictured above. That would be just the right amount of space to allow the belt to exit out the back. Was thinking a 3 phase motor, 1800 rpm, and maybe 1/2hp would be enough, controlled by a VFD. And use a tooth timing belt, just because you don't need to run them as tight as a Vee belt. That way you could have infinitely variable speeds on the fly without any gear shifting. Just like a Hardinge HLV lathe. It is so nice on a Hardinge to just tune a knob and watch the chip, adjusting the feed until the curls begin to break into chips. Interfacing with this shaft via a toothed timing belt would also be a good interface to connect an electronic leadscrew device, as is becoming popular these days.
    I know it sounds drastic to cut 1" off the edge of this casting, but when you think about it, it is kind of an elegant solution to externally drive that belt pulley for the feeds. What do you think??

    --Doozer

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    Just another comment...
    On the grease fittings. I see you have sourced NGLI #1 thickness grease. Probably better than #2, but I personally believe grease in general is too thick for lubricating what are mostly bronze bushings to which the grease fittings are attached. I plan to lubricate my lube fittings with what I call, "Motor Honey", commonly seen for sale as STP or Lucus products. I don't know the exact weight, but honey is a pretty spot on descriptor. It might be close to 600 weight steam cylinder oil. Anyhow, I believe it has the thickness to stay in place, without being so thick to generate the heat that grease will. And motor honey (pick your favorite brand) is pure petroleum. Grease is petroleum and a soap thickener. Pure petroleum always lubricates better. It may not stay in place better, but I don't think we need "stay in place" here as much as good lubrication. And I really don't mind a few oil drips in my chip pan to wipe up. If the lathe is getting more appropriate lubrication, a few drips are not a problem for me.
    Now Kluber bearing grease for the spindle bearings is a great idea if you have some. At the time I had my spindle apart, I did not know about Kluber. What I used on my spindle bearings, was Mobil full synthetic red grease. I believe it is #1 thickness grease. I know you should 60 to 70% fill a bearing, but I pumped them full. I knew about bearing heating, so I ran my spindle with a 1/2 hp motor with one belt, headstock on the workbench. I slowly increased the speed over a period of time, and in said time, grease was being flung out of the bearings through the labyrinths. Over an hour or more time, I got the spindle to 2000 rpm, and I had freaking red grease all over the shop walls, including myself. The bearings were warm, but not hot to the touch. I think maybe 100°F or so. I admit not the best way to add grease to spindle bearings, but I was experimenting and learning. I would probably do it differently today, a more metered and less messy way. But I promise you there is grease in them spindle bearings.

    --Doozer

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  14. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doozer View Post
    Actually I was thinking of changing the belt from being driven from the spindle, to being driven externally by a separate motor,
    I like the idea but I wouldn't cut up the lathe for it. Maybe you could get a smaller motor and fit it inside the housing somehow. The RPM would have to be related to the spindle RPM, right? Maybe a small stepper motor would be the thing.

    I was thinking about needle bearings too. But it's easy to replace the bronze, and the last set made it for 80 years, not worth overthinking it. I did use 660 bronze instead of oilite.

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  16. #53
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    Do you other Hendey owners have an opinion about running the spindle in reverse?

    I understand that it is not really necessary on a lathe with leadscrew-reverse. But it still must come in handy sometimes, right? Did Hendey supply lathes from the factory with reversing starters?

    I have to replace all of the electrical stuff anyways.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jwearing View Post
    Do you other Hendey owners have an opinion about running the spindle in reverse?

    I understand that it is not really necessary on a lathe with leadscrew-reverse. But it still must come in handy sometimes, right? Did Hendey supply lathes from the factory with reversing starters?

    I have to replace all of the electrical stuff anyways.
    Just with tool-room lathes in general, IMO it's safer to polish/sand/file with the spindle going in reverse because there's less chance of something snaging and pulling you into the work. If your file bites into the work (holding file backwards of course), it will throw the file away from you rather than jam it into your hands.

    There are also occasions when it's preferred to use a boring bar on the back side of a bore with the spindle in reverse so you have better visibility of the cut.

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    Quote Originally Posted by M.B. Naegle View Post
    There are also occasions when it's preferred to use a boring bar on the back side of a bore with the spindle in reverse so you have better visibility of the cut.
    Same again with threading away from a shoulder or blind-hole bottom, plus "maybe" rear-mount parting-off (or other) tooling. That said, the only lathe I recall EVER using as did not have reverse was a Hendey tie-bar.

    Didn't miss it for the production work that Day Job was doing on it. Which did not include either threading or boring, the ...wudda been 50 years ... it was there,

    Bought used, dawn of the 1920's, prolly War One surplus, as it had been, and "last seen" around 1974, still making parts. I quit and went away. The Hendey sojered-on.

    "Durable goods" Hendey's can be. Very.

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    On my lathe, the flex shaft that connects the speed control to the PIV is just a wire rope. Surely this is not original, right? Do any of you guys with PIV models mind taking a look and letting me know what you have?

    flex_coupling.jpg

    And thanks for the feedback on the spindle direction. I am shopping for a reversing starter.

  20. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doozer View Post
    Just another comment...
    On the grease fittings. I see you have sourced NGLI #1 thickness grease. Probably better than #2, but I personally believe grease in general is too thick for lubricating what are mostly bronze bushings to which the grease fittings are attached. I plan to lubricate my lube fittings with what I call, "Motor Honey", commonly seen for sale as STP or Lucus products. I don't know the exact weight, but honey is a pretty spot on descriptor. It might be close to 600 weight steam cylinder oil. Anyhow, I believe it has the thickness to stay in place, without being so thick to generate the heat that grease will. And motor honey (pick your favorite brand) is pure petroleum. Grease is petroleum and a soap thickener. Pure petroleum always lubricates better. It may not stay in place better, but I don't think we need "stay in place" here as much as good lubrication. And I really don't mind a few oil drips in my chip pan to wipe up. If the lathe is getting more appropriate lubrication, a few drips are not a problem for me.
    Now Kluber bearing grease for the spindle bearings is a great idea if you have some. At the time I had my spindle apart, I did not know about Kluber. What I used on my spindle bearings, was Mobil full synthetic red grease. I believe it is #1 thickness grease. I know you should 60 to 70% fill a bearing, but I pumped them full. I knew about bearing heating, so I ran my spindle with a 1/2 hp motor with one belt, headstock on the workbench. I slowly increased the speed over a period of time, and in said time, grease was being flung out of the bearings through the labyrinths. Over an hour or more time, I got the spindle to 2000 rpm, and I had freaking red grease all over the shop walls, including myself. The bearings were warm, but not hot to the touch. I think maybe 100°F or so. I admit not the best way to add grease to spindle bearings, but I was experimenting and learning. I would probably do it differently today, a more metered and less messy way. But I promise you there is grease in them spindle bearings.

    --Doozer
    Ugh, reminds me of overhauling my Nichols mill spindle bearings- grease fitting is midway down the spindle, so keep pumping until grease starts coming out of the bearings whereupon it instantly forms a set of parallel stripes on everything both sides of the machine, and above. No features at all resembling labyrinth seals, but happily it eventually stopped flinging out.

    Concur with use of #1 or the 600w lube in this scenario, #2 is a bit stiff which may make the mess worse as it doesn't flow as easily. The Nichols spindle is an opposed ball bearing design, manual spec'ed a 600w liquid grease for the spindle and ways.

  21. #58
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    The speed control cleaned up nicely. I love the cast bronze conical speed dial. The others I have seen in photos are flat.

    There are no lube points on this, and no mention of it on the lube chart. It just runs dry? I know it's just a hand control, but still there is a worm in there, and some plain bearings.

    speed-control1.jpg
    speed-control2.jpg
    speed-control3.jpg

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  23. #59
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    I started work on the PIV. Interesting that it is dated 1960, the machine is a 1939. I guess the PIV had been replaced.

    piv1.jpg
    piv2.jpg

    So, I guess this is what a worn-out PIV chain looks like. And there was a lot of chain debris in the oil sludge at the bottom. I already purchased a replacement, NOS on ebay for $80 (although it's actually two links too long, I'll have to adjust it).
    piv5.jpg

    Otherwise it looks fine, no missing teeth in the pulleys or anything. I'll replace the bearings and seals and hope for no trouble.
    piv3.jpg
    piv4.jpg

  24. #60
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    PIV is done. New bearings, seals, and chain. Also one of the arms on the tension screw was broken so I had to fab a new one (didn't get any photos). I guess someone tried to adjust it when it wasn't running.
    piv_done1.jpg
    piv_done2.jpg
    piv_done3.jpg

    Next up is the twin disc clutch.
    clutch1.jpg
    clutch2.jpg

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