Historic Pittsburgh, PA Inclines
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  1. #1
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    Default Historic Pittsburgh, PA Inclines


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    Inclines were popular in places where lots of people and goods wanted to go up or down steep hills. The incline could go straight up, where ordinary roads had to wander around switchbacks or other much greater distances to keep the road grade gentle. I bet the horses and walking people loved them.

    Cincinnati also had several inclines. Streetcar & Inclines in Cincinnati - YouTube Rare Film Footage of the Mount Adams Incline, Cincinnati, Ohio - YouTube

    The old Cincinnati train station is a museum now. They have a collection of Cincinnati-built machine tools on display. A highlight is a huge model of the city with running electric trains and five inclines. http://www.wurlington-bros.com/DC/miniCincinnati.html Cincinnati In Miniature- A Cincinnati History Museum Display - YouTube

    I have ridden on the small passenger inclines in Hong Kong (Victoria Peak) and Chattanooga, TN (Lookout Mountain). There is a tiny passenger incline at Horseshoe Bend park in PA.

    Larry

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    Quote Originally Posted by L Vanice View Post
    Inclines were popular in places where lots of people and goods wanted to go up or down steep hills. The incline could go straight up, where ordinary roads had to wander around switchbacks or other much greater distances to keep the road grade gentle. I bet the horses and walking people loved them.

    Cincinnati also had several inclines. Streetcar & Inclines in Cincinnati - YouTube Rare Film Footage of the Mount Adams Incline, Cincinnati, Ohio - YouTube

    The old Cincinnati train station is a museum now. They have a collection of Cincinnati-built machine tools on display. A highlight is a huge model of the city with running electric trains and five inclines. http://www.wurlington-bros.com/DC/miniCincinnati.html Cincinnati In Miniature- A Cincinnati History Museum Display - YouTube

    I have ridden on the small passenger inclines in Hong Kong (Victoria Peak) and Chattanooga, TN (Lookout Mountain). There is a tiny passenger incline at Horseshoe Bend park in PA.

    Larry
    Minor quibble, Larry, but our "Peak Tram" in Hong Kong, IS .. a tram. Rather steeper than most. But it is not an incline at all. Nor even a "funicular" railway, as the Swiss still have several of. Jungfrauhoch trip highly recommended.

    The inclines - most of the once-many gone already - in my native Pittsburgh are easily differentiated by the fact that the cabin is built with the angle of the track permanently compensated. The tracks are straight and hold a near-constant angle of inclination, akin to a ladder.

    By contrast, the Peak Tram has curved pockets in the floors so feet can get purchase as the angles change, and seating that has a degree of movement permitted. Its track doesn't hold a constant angle, nor run in a straight line. Far from it.

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    I was in Hong Kong in December, 1973 and forgot the details of the tram car going up the hill. I did the Jungfraujoch train ride in December, 1971 and mostly remember the blasted engine broke down for an hour or so at a station part way up the inside of the mountain. Only had about 10 minutes at the top to use the restroom and saw very little of the view.

    Anyway, my favorite hill climbing train is the Mount Washington (NH) Cog Railway. Been on it four times and never know what the weather will be like at the top, except that it will be very cold, even in July. Had fine clear days and had fog so thick I could not see the train from the door of the observatory a few feet away.

    Larry

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    Quote Originally Posted by L Vanice View Post
    I was in Hong Kong in December, 1973 and forgot the details of the tram car going up the hill. I did the Jungfraujoch train ride in December, 1971 and mostly remember the blasted engine broke down for an hour or so at a station part way up the inside of the mountain. Only had about 10 minutes at the top to use the restroom and saw very little of the view.

    Anyway, my favorite hill climbing train is the Mount Washington (NH) Cog Railway. Been on it four times and never know what the weather will be like at the top, except that it will be very cold, even in July. Had fine clear days and had fog so thick I could not see the train from the door of the observatory a few feet away.

    Larry
    We share that "other" Mt. Washington (most of Pittsburgh's were on a mere hill but with the same name) one as well, then. Around 1949 or 1950, IIRC. Dad was Ft. Ethan Allen, VT's last US Army Post Commander - his task turning it over to the USAF.

    Seems an odd fit, save that their "electric cannon" was a then still highly classified project undergoing testing at nearby Underhill Artillery Range. Oye! The trout fishing when so few others had permissive access!


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    Hi Paul

    Thanks for sharing these clips ... most interesting. Non in England that I'm aware of other than the Snowdon mountain railway so good to see

    Snowdon Railway

    John

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    Quote Originally Posted by Monarchist View Post
    Dad was Ft. Ethan Allen, VT's last US Army Post Commander - his task turning it over to the USAF.

    Seems an odd fit, save that their "electric cannon" was a then still highly classified project undergoing testing at nearby Underhill Artillery Range.
    Bill -

    And in the late 60s that is where GE Burlington still tested - and I'm guessing 'sold off' to get the stamp, the miniguns. Night skiing at Bolton Valley (locals and poor college students mainly, a small place) sort of next door you could hear them plainly on a Friday night. My one friend had his girl friend convinced it was bears making that sound.

    Dale

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    Quote Originally Posted by duckfarmer27 View Post
    My one friend had his girl friend convinced it was bears making that sound.
    LOL! The "acoustic signature" of a 20 mil carried a tad further than the mini.

    Wonder if she wudda believed it was the zippers on bear suits!

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    Back to the OP, there is a funicular in Quebec that I have ridden on. It is quite interesting,

    Jon P.

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    Quote Originally Posted by L Vanice View Post
    Anyway, my favorite hill climbing train is the Mount Washington (NH) Cog Railway. Been on it four times and never know what the weather will be like at the top, except that it will be very cold, even in July. Had fine clear days and had fog so thick I could not see the train from the door of the observatory a few feet away.

    Larry
    Never rode the Cog Larry but have walked up Mt Washington several times. The weather up there can indeed be unexpected. Once back in my high school days circa 1980-81 I was up there in the summer and it was foggy and freezing on top. Went back in late Sept early Oct of that same year and it was 60 Degrees F on the summit and not a cloud to be seen.

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    There are a couple of older threads about incline railways on this forum for those who may not have seen them before.
    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...ncline+Railway

    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...ncline+Railway

    Regards,
    Jim


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