Holbrook C10 #10411 - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    I am sure the shaft will repair, the collar and pin I doubt are savable though lol
    Keep up the good work rustytool, to say the least it will be worth it!

  2. #22
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    I tried all the usual tricks of heat, penetrating oil, tapping from both sides and in the end it had to be drilled out.
    Might be able to slightly over size the hole for the same taper pin size or just go up a size.
    dscn0212.jpgdscn0213.jpg

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  4. #23
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    Disassembled the apron. The worms and wheels and half nuts look great. One shaft was badly rusted. You can see the hole in-between two of the gear teeth that was the passage way for oil to get to the shaft and the bronze bearing it runs in. The hole was clogged and without oil and condensation from the years of unheated storage is my guess as to what happened. The bronze bearing is undamaged. dscn0217.jpgdscn0214.jpg

  5. #24
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    Keep it coming rustytool, the more pics the better. The apron looks in great condition.
    Have you found any grease in the oil nipples?

  6. #25
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    I've found grease in all the oil nipples. The plunger oil gun that came with the lathe was filled with grease. I've replaced that with oil and have cleaned out all the oil nipples.
    I've seen this lots of times before. "oil? That's crazy talk. Lets just grease everything and call it good."
    [ATTACH=CONFIG]269199[ATTACH=CONFIG]269201
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dscn0218.jpg   dscn0208.jpg   dscn0203.jpg  

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  8. #26
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    Holbrook H-15 apron | MIG Welding Forum

    I know the feeling!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails apron-4.jpg  

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  10. #27
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    The pivoting power feed assemblies were tricky to remove and install. They are supported in the middle by a bushing that is held in place with a taper pin.
    One assembly needs to be placed in position and the bushing slide in farther than it's final position so the second assembly can be put in.
    Then the bushing is slide back and secured with the taper pin.dscn0219.jpgdscn0220.jpgdscn0221.jpg

  11. #28
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    The feed rod overload clutch assembly.
    One on each side for the longitudinal and cross.
    When an overload occurs the rod with pointed end is wedged up and trips out the power feed.
    dscn0222.jpgdscn0224.jpg

  12. #29
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    Maybe some shall we say ''none believers'' will see what was meant by ''The thinking mans DS&G.

    FWIW The hand fit up and individual assembly time for each lathe must have been horrendous

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  14. #30
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    There is a oil passage in the apron that lines up with a hole in the top half nut when the half nuts are closed (engaged on the leadscrew). Oil then flows and fills the little reservoir on top of the top half nut.
    The last photo shows the eccentric that opens and closes the half nuts and engages and disengages the lock out to prevent the cross feed from being engaged when threading.
    dscn0229.jpgdscn0230.jpgdscn0231.jpgdscn0232.jpgdscn0233.jpg

  15. #31
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    I don't know if you are a member of the Holbrook group, but if not it's worth joining, there is a fair bit of Holbrook specific info on there. My brother did a write-up on timing the threading/feed gearbox for a C13, though the C10 box will be basically the same, I don't think it was a trivial matter.

    The group is in the process of finalising the move from Yahoo to Apple, so it may be a little while before all the files are accessible.

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    Have used a few DS&G's and like them very much (altho would it be too much trouble for an Englishman to make a lathe for someone over 5'2" tall?) and have seen a few Holbrooks, including this one when it lived on the lower mainland. Have never used a Holbrook though. Not sure I understand why the C10 or C13 get so much adoration. Kindly explain?

    L7

  17. #33
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    Is that the gear box on the front or on the left end ?

  18. #34
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    L7, I haven't even run it yet so I can't say in that respect but just by observing the build quality it is very heavily built and without compromise.
    Like everything some people just like them and some don't.
    At 5'7" I like the height.

  19. #35
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    36392ed1-2396-4850-8080-2b72411d011a.jpg5282f316-53eb-4d2d-9704-1057dc987c50.jpgHi Greg
    I like what you are doing with the lathe it’s just what I would have done only had no time to do that. What I liked was the stop rod for the carrage with four tools in the tool post I would use a 1 2 3 bock or shims to set the lengths for turning and parting of parts. I would say it’s better then a EE lathe. It will be a Gem when you have it back together.
    With down sizing the shop it is hard pick which machines to take so far it’s the oldest with the biggest swing looks like a pos and a picture of my first brand new lathe when I was 14 years old.
    Collector

  20. #36
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    Can I ask what number is on those collets?

    I have a set just like it that I have been unable to identify

    Bill

    Stop-press:
    Found them :-)
    They are the 1/4" to 1-1/4" set seen here on the right (the box has a hole in the bottom to let the collet closer tube run down through the mounting post)

    http://www.lathes.co.uk/holbrook-B-13-71-21/img19.jpg


    Quote Originally Posted by rustytool View Post
    The plain spindle bearing ones have a top speed of 2000 but the ones with roller bearings, like this one, top out at 3000.
    It has a set of tiny collets that are a proprietary Holbrook size that fit into the spindle with an adapter.
    Anyone know what the taper is in the spindle nose. Smaller that a 4mt and bigger that a 3mt.
    Was there such a thing as a 3-1/2 morse taper ?
    Attachment 268184

  21. #37
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    Cleaned up the rack and start stop switch gears. They have timing marks punched in them which makes timing them a non issue. New felts for the way guards.
    dscn0240.jpgdscn0241.jpgdscn0239.jpgdscn0247.jpgdscn0242.jpg

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  23. #38
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    Got the saddle and apron on and the leadscrew, power feed rod and start/stop/forward/reverse rods in.
    dscn0246.jpgdscn0251.jpgdscn0253.jpg

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  25. #39
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    I agree with LimiSami in that this lathe must have been horrendous to set together. It is with equal respect that you accomplished an overhaul, if not rebuild of this complicated carriage.

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  27. #40
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    Got the gear box cover on. The only tricky part was having the worm gear in the proper rotational orientation so that when the sliding tumbler gear is raised it is in the proper position.
    dscn0245.jpgdscn0250.jpg

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