Home made Milling Machine Built in ??? 1925-1939?? Emil Guenther (restored to new) - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    If someone could find the patterns and drawings. That is a work of art. Keep posting pictures and any more stories.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Owl Engineering View Post
    I do have more pictures, but you must be kidding???

    Chuck
    The reverse.

    Think it through. All those 'Grand Old" top-end machine tool builders we revere?

    Commercial enterprises. They had budgets. Budgets are limitations.

    Their "best guys" were not able to do as much as they wanted to do, ship the best they could have done. Customers called those shots. Wars, even.

    Great compromises were made, but compromises, they had to be - every damned one.

    You have the "rest of the story". A machine-tool built by a craftsman FOR a craftsman, to suit himself and no one else.

    Budget be double-damned.

    Lots of things folks like Ettore Bugatti actually got wrong as to engineering. But "attention to detail" was never on the list. That his motorcars were generally fast was incidental. What he was building were works of art.

    Same here. See also Denis Foster, present-day.

    How good is it as a mill? I have no klew.

    How good the craftsman? Sumbich was top of his craft. THAT much IS clear.

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  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    How good is it as a mill? I have no klew.
    How good the craftsman? Sumbich was top of his craft. THAT much IS clear.
    Seems like it does not get much use these days, which is a shame. I prefer seeing one of
    this covered with chips.

    The ability to make custom castings, was the genesis of this miller. Another person who
    wonders if the drawings and patterns are lost to the ravages of time.

    The paint, yes, that's nice. But chrome don't get ya home. As the motorbike folks say.

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  6. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    Seems like it does not get much use these days, which is a shame. I prefer seeing one of
    this covered with chips.

    The ability to make custom castings, was the genesis of this miller. Another person who
    wonders if the drawings and patterns are lost to the ravages of time.

    The paint, yes, that's nice. But chrome don't get ya home. As the motorbike folks say.
    Chrome won't get you home, but it sure beats scrubbing grasshopper guts out of rough castings and other rough surfaces!

    Looking at that mill and drill press, I see a couple pretty good magazine articles worth submitting to any number of magazines worldwide, not to mention at least one decent article on the actual process of making those brushes.

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  8. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    The paint, yes, that's nice. But chrome don't get ya home. As the motorbike folks say.
    Ya don't have to kick it to death till it starts

  9. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    Seems like it does not get much use these days,
    Aye.. the USUAL problem - night ladies have the same challenge - when yah just FINISH a full restore and want fotos before putting it back to doing the dirty.


  10. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevj View Post
    Chrome won't get you home, but it sure beats scrubbing grasshopper guts out of rough castings and other rough surfaces!
    Aye.. teeth, beard, and eyebrows for those who figured Ray Bans were all the "windscreen" a Bridgestone 90 could spare the mass to carry...

  11. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    ...

    The paint, yes, that's nice. But chrome don't get ya home. As the motorbike folks say.
    In the tractor world I have heard
    paint don't pull a plow.

    -Doozer

  12. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    Seems like it does not get much use these days, which is a shame. I prefer seeing one of
    this covered with chips.

    The ability to make custom castings, was the genesis of this miller. Another person who
    wonders if the drawings and patterns are lost to the ravages of time.

    The paint, yes, that's nice. But chrome don't get ya home. As the motorbike folks say.
    Bob the owner mostly tinkers. I encouraged him not to mill with it. I think it belongs "as new" in a museum.

    Again, I used it in 1966 and it ran great and was solid.

    Chuck

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