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  1. #21
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    Gears, and getting to the questions I have for y’all.

    The first driven gear and pinion fit together pretty OK for what they are, I adjusted the pinion thrust washer for a good fit without binding at any point.


    The outer driven gear though did not mesh very well at all, it bound up a whole lot and fit with about another 1/16” spacing between that gear and the pinion. Looking at the gear teeth I was pretty sure why, these teeth are pretty much parallel and I understand bevel gears need teeth that are thinner in the center of the gear than at the outer edge. Have a look at these two pictures and compare to the inner driven gear above.
    (note in second picture I had already filed the corners of some teeth a little)


    Here we can see how they mesh, or don’t.


  2. #22
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    What to do???
    I first tried just filing the inner corners of the teeth thinking that would help, but it didn’t much, those corners turns out don’t even mesh with the pinion.
    I soon realized I would just have to file every side of each tooth to taper them much like the other gear that does work.

    And a lot of filling it was, and then some more and even more after that…
    The ones on the left are done, on the right yet to do.

    It took some hours, most of Monday actually with a few brakes (rewards really) in the middle to work on other parts of the machine. Finally I had it fitting pretty well and with a little touch up on a couple teeth I could rotate the gears without them binding and lifting the cover.


  3. #23
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    Now this is how the pinion meshed with the outer gear and similar fashion with the inner gear. I think ideally the pinion could slide in another 3/32" to get more of the tooth in contact?



    What are the chances of actually shaping the gear teeth to a real tooth profile, might there be enough material on them?
    Who can do such a job? The inner gear I can't do on a milling machine because of the hub, must need a bevel gear shaper?

    The outer driven gear and even a brand new pinion I think can be done on a vertical milling machine with a dividing head tipped up or down to taper the tooth? This is not something I've ever done, seems like a tricky job in any case.

    Though I am content to use it as for now I welcome any ideas and thoughts on improving he gear fit, because if it seems feasible I'd be interested to try something.

    Thanks,
    Grigg

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    Grigg,

    Though I am content to use it as for now I welcome any ideas and thoughts on improving he gear fit, because if it seems feasible I'd be interested to try something.
    You could make a fixture to hold the gears in the running position, slather them with valve grinding compound and run forwards and backwards to taste. Then carefully clean the grit off.

    Paul

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Michaels View Post
    Grigg:

    ...the big question is: what will you drive your ice cream freezer with ? ...what kind of engine will you drive it with to keep in step with the caliber of work you put into the freezer ?

    ...Do the Amish folks who made your ice cream freezer make ice-chipping machines ? ...The ice chippers were made by a firm in Long Island City, NY called Stimmel Brothers.

    ...I am sure you and your family will have a lot of enjoyment with your reworked ice cream freezer.
    The big answer is I have a small Volvo Penta model MD-1 marine engine already rigged up on a cart I made and running an 8qt ice cream freezer.
    This is a good picture of it but not the latest. Also a newer picture. Here is a whole album



    I'm familiar with the ice chippers you describe and have seen a few before I knew what they were and now a few after, they pop up on ebay every so often like this one by stimmel (it is about as nice a one as I've seen too!) I briefly thought of finding one to run as well, but for my use I'll keep it simple(er) and use common ice cubes. Not so easy to get block ice around here that I know of short of freezing it yourself.

    Yes, we enjoy it very much. I should say we have enjoyed the 8qt and look forward to the 20 qt. I will setup the 20 qt on the cart as the primary and move the 8qt to a removable extension on the back, that's next weeks project. We'll be able to run both or just one or remove the 8 qt altogether. We're having a huge family reunion July 4th which will be the first big opportunity for the 20 qt though I'll try to get in a test run before that.


    Quote Originally Posted by paul39 View Post
    Grigg,

    Beautiful work. Amazing what we will sometimes do for our own amusement.

    Could you make any money selling reworked ice cream machines at $1000 each?

    Would you want to do another?

    Paul
    Thanks Paul,
    No, no money to be made there as they sell for more than $1,000 to start with. I probably have 30-40 hours in tuning up this one. Yes a lot of that was head scratching and learning as I went but even with some good jigs and fixtures (if doing several at once) and a well thought out plan it would take some time. It would be a whole lot more convenient (and less frustrating) if they'd just cast the parts with enough material on them from the start and then machine accurately to fit, skip all the bushings and correcting the originally poor fits. Not sure what the cost of bronze for those larger bushings would be either as I already had the stock on the shelf, might not be cheap.

    Would I do another? I'm not sure, I suppose for my own use I could and would if I need to but for someone else I think it'd have to pay fairly.

    Grigg

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    Quote Originally Posted by paul39 View Post
    Grigg,

    You could make a fixture to hold the gears in the running position, slather them with valve grinding compound and run forwards and backwards to taste. Then carefully clean the grit off.

    Paul
    Yes, that's one option but I think just using it might be similar.
    Guess I'm more interested in cutting the teeth to a uniform/proper profile if I do anything.

    For reference the pinion has 16 teeth and about 2-13/16" OD. The other two gears are 24 teeth and about 3-3/4" OD. Ratio is 1.5:1

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    Moving on.

    I didn't care much for how the stainless bands on the bucket were fastened so I reused some hose clamp hardware.



    I decided to mount the new 20 qt maker where the old 8 qt one was. This required a new bracket for the jack shaft between engine and the 20 qt machine that was previously supported by part of the 8 qt drive assembly.
    Bent this out of stainless and set here to weld it together, the block gives proper spacing to fit inside the cart rails.





    Here is the overall arrangement, mostly just mocked up at this point, not finished.




    Then I had a few repairs to make on the engine and figured may as well take it out where it is easy to work on the bench. At which point only a few more bolts and I can sand and refinish the wood. It is only a couple years old if that and keep inside most all the time but the original finish didn't weather so well, so I'll try something different.


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    Wow. Just WOW!

    That is a great labor of love.
    I would gladly be on the list to buy a setup like that, but I couldn't afford all your hard work.

    I too have taken $100 items and put thousands of dollars of time into them "just because" but few of my projects came out as nice as yours.

    Great job! And great post!

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    Thanks, it has been mostly a fun project and very satisfying to have things in good order now.

    Last night I reassembled the cart after a second coat of finish the night before. I was tempted to sand the slightly raised grain a little and give it one more coat but decided against it. I'm ready to get this thing together and working and I suppose it is already smooth enough and well coated at this point.
    Last week I had made new tie rods for the cart from stainless because the first set were just painted mild steel and the salt water was starting to get to them. I was afraid if I let them go they'd rust tight in the wood and cause trouble with splitting or removal if it was ever necessary again.




    With that much assembled I put the new jackshaft bracket in and bolted on the jackshaft. Painted all the pulleys red over the last few evenings because I didn't care for the green that the large ones were. The 4 Micarta pucks at the rear of the cart are spacers for a plank that the new 20 Qt bucket sits on and will attach to.




    This is that "plank", some 5/8" Micarta. I test fit it and the bucket last night and made my layout marks for the latches and the locating thingamajigs. Shown is a little drill jig to help drill those holes spaced appropriately, one end for the latches and the other for the thingamajigs. I then tapped the holes 1/4-20. Tonight I'll round corners and install it for good.

  11. #30
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    Grigg
    I should have known you were a PM member.
    I have met Grigg several times and he is a top notch craftsman.
    Takes great pride in his work.
    Even got to watch his ice cream maker run this past spring and help feast on the results latter.
    The next day he treated me to tour of his shop which is cramped but has everything a machine head would want.

    Don King

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    Thanks Don, glad you had time to stop by back in April.

    Made a little more progress last night with the locators and platform.
    These buttons are on the bottom of the bucket and register with the thingamajigs on the platform. The screw hole is off center so some adjustment for position if needed. Second picture is the platform all done. They work really well, easy to set the bucket in place or close and wiggle it a little to fall home, and then it is very securely located, and it's all invisible in use.




    And with the bucket in place



    Also set the engine back in place. Then I scratched my head and thought about belt tensioners, that's this evening's project.

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    The belt tensioner stuff took a little longer than I expected... some trial and error too.
    Had in my mind that one of the the linkages would to go over center and it would hold in the released position, use it as a sort of clutch on the ice cream maker.
    First I made up the arms with pulleys, bushings, and pivot brackets; that wasn't so tricky, left side of the first picture.
    Then I made a paper pattern of what I thought I needed for the link for the spring. Gave half a try at bending it out of 3/4" by 1/8" strap.. Then cleaned up the layout and cut one out of 16ga stainless sheet.


    Seems I had part of the idea but I neglected to have much of a lever arm on the bottom side of center, so it would hold released but not firmly, it was pretty floppy still. The stainless one became a pattern of sorts with a solidly bolted little link (part of the failed bent strap idea). That let me fine tune the design and lastly I made up the link shown on the left here, bent from 3/16" X 1/2" stainless, which I could easily bend even the hard way with good results. It is still very stiff, overall a much better material size than a wide thin strap would have been.


    This set of pictures show how it fits together and works


  14. #33
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    Friday evening after sorting out the tensioner stuff I took it outside for a test run to check speeds. The manufacturer suggested 60 RPM is ideal for the freezer, I had also been told by the folks that sold the 8qt that 30-60 would be good. So 60 or a little less was the plan.
    This so far is identical to what I had setup with the 8 qt except for the small pulley running the 16" one on the ice cream maker.
    I had changed out a very small pulley for the about 4" double groove pulley seen here. It was going to run to fast, I'd just see what it was and adjust the engine to jack shaft pulleys to suit.




    So the engine I want to run at about 1,000 rpm which is about half speed or a little less and it runs reasonably smooth enough there, though it certainly still shakes being a 1 cylinder diesel.
    The transmission has a built in 1.87:1 reduction gear. I forget all the other speeds and ratios now but the freezer pulley was running 97 RPM. I calculated that by changing only the first pulley on the jack shaft to 7.25" OD it'd give about 60 RPM at the freezer. Luckily enough I already had just that pulley and swapped it and the belt out. Also had to make some modifications to that tensioner. Drilled and taped another hole for the idler closer in to the pivot and bent the arm to offset it a little.
    Put it together for another test run and the final speed checked out just perfect, right at 60 plus or minus one or two while the engine was running near 1,000 rpm but adjusted so things shook the least.

    The new pulley though had the set screw opposite the key and the hub was pretty small diameter, not sure what the original application was. I like having the set screw on the key so it can't walk out. I made a collar to press on the hub and then drilled and taped where I wanted the set screw. (tape in the bore just before painting it red)




    While running it to test speeds I noticed the bucket shakes and hammers pretty good on the platform and sideways on the little locating buttons screwed to the bottom. First attempt to help that was plane the bottom here and there so it would sit flat and not rock any, which helped with the shake but not the sideways hammering on those buttons.
    Next idea was to put a thin rubber sheet under the bucket but I didn't have anything on hand. After sleeping on it I thought about some little rubber buttons just under the bucket rim at each of the four clamps. They needed to be soft enough to grip the wood but not so soft they flex a lot and contribute to the shakes. Decided on some nominally 1/4" thick circles 1" OD set into counterbores in the platform protruding about 1/32" high.
    Made my scribe lines and set up to them in the mill for the counterboring with a 1" end mill (sorry no pictures) I know end mills don't spot a flat bottomed hole and thought that'd be OK, actually I picked an end mill with more relief thinking the rubber conforming to that and the wood may help the bucket sit more securely, just a guess.

    The rubber I cut/punched on the lathe with a tube bored to size and sharpened. Double stick tape a piece of soft pine end grain to the tool post, lube the cutter inside and out with dish soap and water about 1:1, then feed reasonably quick while the lathe turns the cutter reasonably slow. Some trial and error and bore the cutter out to achieve the proper finished size on the rubber. I have not run it yet with this addition but I think it'll work quite well, as good as anything I can come up with. The bucket now sits only on the rubber, hovering close over the platform.





    Finally grease and final assembly of the gear housing.




    The whole thing is a little hard to grab onto and heavy even without another 100lb of ice cream and ice in it. White Mountain who originally made this style freezer (which Country Freezer has closely copied) originally came with nice handles on the larger model.
    Last year I picked up some pieces and parts for an original white Mountain 20 QT including a set of those handles. At this point country freezer has not reproduced these though it may happen eventually and they'd be bronze if they do.
    Made some 1/16" rubber pads that helped by spacing the handles out so they fit the contour of the bucket better as well as added a bumper for the handles at rest.


    The originals were galvanized and about 3/4 of it missing on mine. I called a somewhat local galvanising shop and they have a $250 minimum order (usually hand rails and structural stuff) but though he could do these for $100. I have searched trying to find a galvanizer who deals with smaller parts and could do these more reasonably but no luck yet.
    In the mean time I used galvanized paint and have pretty low hopes for it.

    Any ideas on a good glavanising shop for small jobs??

  15. #34
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    Finally Sunday I have the whole thing nearly wrapped up!



    What's not done:
    -Tiny fuel leak at the filter, need to change out some copper washers on a banjo fitting.
    -Check temperature, burp air out of cooling system, and or change thermostat. I think it may be running warm and thermostat not opening just in the little I've run it during these upgrades.

    What I now realize could have done different is mount the jack shaft several inches to the left (not centered) giving more clearance for the pulley at the milk can and also pulling more nearly straight down on the drive belt for the 20 qt machine, less side load on the buttons that locate the bucket. Pretty sure I'll never bother to change that.. but if anyone wanted to make their own do keep that in mind.

    Tomorrow morning I'll pick another bunch of wild black raspberries (already got the first picking Saturday morning) and in the evening cook up some ice cream. Wednesday after work will be the trial run, have invited some friends over to help.

    PS
    What's really not done or even started yet is the whole platform and drive for the 8qt machine to go on the back of the cart.

  16. #35
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    Few days ago I swapped out the pot metal wing nut on the air cleaner for an old bronze one I had laying around, looks more appropriate. I had earlier installed the modern paper element air filter on it because being a marine engine it didn't need or come with much for a filter.



    This evening is the first batch with the 20QT, should be fun.

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    I intended to get some pictures and a short video with the machine running but I got distracted with everything else going on.
    Here is a picture of the ice cream social my Aunt and Uncle hosted as part of a large family reunion over the weekend. From 2 batches we served somewhere between 150 and 200 people not counting seconds and thirds and so on.




    First time using a little ice cream dipping cabinet I picked up a year ago, it was made in the 50's I think, Schaefer brand.



    Grigg

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  19. #37
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    Looks good Grigg and sounds like it ran good.
    Blackberries are turning ripe here now and I'll be picking as many as my back will allow tomorrow. I hope to have enough for the Stovebolt Homecoming next spring. My goal is two gallons, frozen in water, for you to do your magic.

    Thanks for the posting the work progress and the pictures.

    Don

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    We've run it 4 times so far, getting easier each time as I future out the peculiarities of the 20qt machine, the recipe adjustments, and how much salt to use.
    Made Mint Chocolate Chip Friday.

    A revision was necessary to the locating button on the bottom of the wood tub. Originally I used a sheet metal screw to attach them and after each batch the front one had worked loose. Switched that little screw out for a special nut and a 1/4-20 screw. If I had any bronze or stainless 3/8" carriage bolts on hand that would have been a nice start on making the special nut and would have been square under the head. May yet need to replace the other, but so far so good. I also decided to do away with the eccentric adjustment on the front button, not necessary.



    Was not real excited about drilling a hole through the bottom of the bucket but over all seemed like the best option I guess.
    Last edited by Grigg; 08-10-2015 at 08:27 AM.

  21. #39
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    Grigg -

    Have enjoyed your thread - a work of art for me. If I ever get the desire to dip more ice cream I might have to copy your build, but I might be dipped out.

    When I was a kid back in the late 50s / early 60s I dipped a lot of ice cream. One of my Dad's entrepreneurial endeavors was an ice cream business, where we made our own. At the height of the summer season we would have around 32 to 37 flavors, as I recall. Once I got old (actually tall) enough to reach into the back of the dipping cabinet, probably at age 9 in 1958, I had to start earning my keep. Almost every evening starting around 7 we (think it was always 6 of us) would start dipping as the lines formed and we would go non-stop until between 9 and 10 - Sundays it was all afternoon and then into the evening. Once I was about 15 and could hold 7 cones in my left hand and dip with my right I figured I had 'arrived'. You also learned how to add quickly in your head, make change (always leave the bill on the counter and count the change back prior to picking it up) - thankfully no NY sales tax at that point. Later on I made some ice cream, but not as much as my younger brother did, just due to circumstances. Overall a great experience, and learned to deal with the public. Most folks were great, but I learned there always is the 10% out there - the mean ones were the worst, especially the men who like to bully kids if they could - although my Dad or Uncle made short work of them. The idiots I never did learn to put up with - we had a sign board out front, plus on the wall, two places a customer could look and see the whole list (plus sundaes, floats, sodas, milk shakes, etc). Invariably someone would get to the window and ask what flavors we had. After rattling off all of them 95% of the time they would get the smallest cone of vanilla (when I started dipping, 8 cents for a 3 ounce dip in a cone). Never could figure those people out - maybe they just could not read?

    Keep up the good work. If you make some Grape Nut let me know and I'll be over - that is still my favorite, although I will consume any kind of ice cream there is except banana.

    Dale

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    If you make banana, I'll have Dale's!

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