Identifying a Lathe I just saved from the Scrap Heap - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Klewless "clerical" mindset, Wankers at werke as think all brains on-planet are less clever than their ones or in a coma.

    Anyone actually scouting wudda sent in a pair of Mark-One eyeballs attached to a brain with decent memory as could grok staff loading, skill levels, machine count, set-up, incoming QC, stock handling and WIP transfer scheme, inspection methodology, general and customized machine capability, and for-damned-sure "brand immaterial".

    Then usually plan to IMPROVE upon the methods of the place being snooped. Or, in the case of Titmus Optical, prove it wasn't worth the bother, and should be sold-off. As it was, same year.

    One of life's more interesting "additional duties", actually.



    It ain't exactly remote-control gene-splicing from a lab in Mars orbit if a common Colchester can manage it, is it?
    Whoever thought the idea up I don't know, I suspect some bean counter in the top office. Chances are that it wouldn't have been a very effective ruse. Having said that it kept me in work as a young apprentice.

    Regards Tyrone.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    Whoever thought the idea up I don't know, I suspect some bean counter in the top office. Chances are that it wouldn't have been a very effective ruse. Having said that it kept me in work as a young apprentice.

    Regards Tyrone.
    I can recall an "assignment" wherein I did seriously good enhanced microfilm shots with through-PCB backlighting to reveal internal layers on one of the first pre-production Data General "Nova" computers for "our side".

    Thinking themselves ever-so-clever, the buggers had paid someone to sand-OFF the IC data stamped atop each IC.

    It was of no use. My Boss and I had worked up a functional block diagram, then grokked the chips that HAD to be used from the PCB traces before the next day had ended. THEN he had to brag how fast he and I had rev-engineered the Nova - two many-nines minds in under 30 hours from a never-before-seen cold start!

    Figured my name was mud in whole industry, Jack just HAD to brag.

    But noooo.. Before the week was out, a Data General VP thought it a stitch and made he a seriously BETTER job offer to cross-over. More than DOUBLE the wages I had at the time.

    Might have taken it, but had already "generated" the chance to learn more useful things, yet - by changing industries entirely. Went off to do another impossible task and see what could be learnt from a guy named Gerhardt Andlinger as byproduct. No accident. Access was a part of what they had to consider right in my cheap-in-dollars compensation package.

    Never met Harold Geneen. Had three of his direct reports as next-higher or next-up the line mentors rather. Finance? More to it than beans. Seed-corn as well. Universal blood supply, funding, building, evaluating, and running ANY bizness.

    Gerry was by no means the last high-octane mentor, either.

    "Mentors". God bless 'em.

    They can beat all-Hell out of ivory-Tower Academic nerdles if yah but pay close attention.

    Nice wages. Stock options. Benefits including personalized training courses, No "college loan debt", ever even a single cent.

    Only the first flock had to do with machining or 'puter technology.

    And maybe the LAST as well, given the wheel of a varied life has dropped me back HERE, after an interesting "circle"!

    Or so I thot it was, the whole long while.

    And still do, thanks to you lot of inter-stinging personalities and - of course - "problem solvers", par excellence, no matter WHERE yah learnt THAT crucial craft.

    "Life's a bitch?" Not once yah find out what a grandly accomplished, teasingly interesting, and ever-passionate shag she can be, good days or otherwise!


  3. #23
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    Colchester from 1945-46 according to the serial number. They had an oval brass label on the headstock and sometimes the name cast into the gear cover on the RH end.

  4. #24
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    Essentially, you miss the saddle, cross-slide, compound, apron, and gap insert.
    The "platform" mounted right now as saddle is not the original saddle and, I'd bet, it would be incompatible with the original apron. In any case, it lacks wings of acceptable length toward the headstock. the gap inset is generally machined together with the rest of the bed and it is fitted to that specific bed. No much interchangeability between lathes, without re-grinding the bed with the new insert.

    As mentioned in other posts, you have a great parts donor that could bring you enough cash to pay back all the expenses and purchase a lathe in working conditions.

    Trying to fix it would be a long and challenging project draining a lot of financial resources and time,

    Paolo

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paolo_MD View Post
    Essentially, you miss the saddle, cross-slide, compound, apron, and gap insert.
    The "platform" mounted right now as saddle is not the original saddle and, I'd bet, it would be incompatible with the original apron. In any case, it lacks wings of acceptable length toward the headstock.
    Paolo
    That's the correct saddle for that lathe and they work well for the capacity of the lathe.

  6. #26
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    Congrats on saving the lathe! I am sure you will be able restore it. I was in Tubbercurry once and saw a 8N Ford tractore with a fabricated intake manifold.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    Its a Colchester roundtop Triumph of the 1950s.....if its got roller bearing spindle its post war....prewar had plain bearings.......the whole apron is missing,so IMHO ,its a manual feed if you are keen........If the gears in the QC box are OK ,there is value there.
    Good eye John!

    Steve.

    Sent from my SM-J737P using Tapatalk

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paolo_MD View Post
    Essentially, you miss the saddle, cross-slide, compound, apron, and gap insert.
    The "platform" mounted right now as saddle is not the original saddle and, I'd bet, it would be incompatible with the original apron. In any case, it lacks wings of acceptable length toward the headstock. the gap inset is generally machined together with the rest of the bed and it is fitted to that specific bed. No much interchangeability between lathes, without re-grinding the bed with the new insert.

    As mentioned in other posts, you have a great parts donor that could bring you enough cash to pay back all the expenses and purchase a lathe in working conditions.

    Trying to fix it would be a long and challenging project draining a lot of financial resources and time,

    Paolo
    Nah - it's the OEM saddle.

    But.. UNTIL yah at least fab a bit of plate as a mount to hold a shaft, bushing or bearing, pinion gear and handwheel in decent position to the longitudinal RACK which IS still there, ELSE a mount a half-nut or "full" nut, and add handwheel, TS end, adapted onto the old leadscrew for traverse, OR.. provide an anchor and add a LEVER to move it... so yah can use it to bootstrap-fab the next, nicer monkey-patch.. repeat until all-good again, etc.

    Yah have no long-axis traverse ... except for release of clamp, move the saddle to a new position by hand - then clamp it again.

    At present all the "travel" is limited to the compound's range.

    Now.. close to 100% of PM members or any country boy, Assam to Zimbabwe .. who WANTED TO badly enough.. could take what is left of that old Colchy - just as you SEE it NOW...

    And carve a whole new apron and everything IN it, gears included - off not a damned thing more than raw metal and a surplus of the raw GUTS of far more determination than resembles anything remotely sane, back in the land where plenty of better choices can be had cheaply and rapidly.

    The first all-metal lathes ever built didn't come out of no pre-existing "factory", did they? Skill, desperate need, patience and determination, rather.

    But just because something is "possible" doesn't make it a good idea.

    I'd part it out, take a "scouting" holiday to the UK or the Continent. Find me a seriously NICER lathe than a Colchy, git 'er back to Eire.

    Might be, you can find one no further way than a brisk walk afoot of an afternoon, even. Ireland ain't exactly Howland Island, is it?

    Start over with hope, pride, and prospects of a far better outcome.

    Lazy, Iyam. Very.

    I don't want to "stand on the shoulders of giants". Good way to fall off and break yer insufficiently gymnasty-ass neck.

    All I want is the keys to his TRUCK and the loan of his forklift ...so I can carry-away the "giant"'s best Old Iron .... for small money!


  9. #29
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    If no replacement parts can be found it could easily be used for wood turning and/or metal spinning.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    If no replacement parts can be found it could easily be used for wood turning and/or metal spinning.
    JR HS / HS shop had bespoke lathes or BOTH of those. They are wot they are.

    Geared head metal-turner? There are better mounts for conversion. RPM is a bit low for either.

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    Part it out...at current asking prices from Colchester breakers ,there would be 10,000 quids worth of parts there.....chuck with internal taper mount and drive clutch are hot items....Gears from QC box at 100 quid each,.....topslide and tailstock 500 quid each.....Get the idea?

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    Thanks all for your great help and tips and information. I am now 99% sure the lathe in 1940's vintage it is defiantly Colchester and from everything I have read and all the cross references it looks like it is a 1942 Master. Given it only has one high low leaver on the front and it uses a mechanical clutch to engage and disengage drive to the chuck. I am getting close to having an apron that can be modified to work with the current saddle and it is defiantly the original saddle. the compound and cross slide are perfect there is 0 back lash in them. I will start a thread on the restoration when it starts for anyone interested in following along. Mean while if anyone knows of or has spares they want to part with for a mid 40's Masters I would be more than interested.
    Cheers again for all the help
    regards
    Paul.

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    Roundtop Master /Student parts are astronomically expensive ....the apron is likely the same as used up to 1964 and the safety feed.......it has a sliding lever to engage the feeds.The gearing is very simple.

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulDH View Post
    Thanks all for your great help and tips and information. I am now 99% sure the lathe in 1940's vintage it is defiantly Colchester and from everything I have read and all the cross references it looks like it is a 1942 Master. Given it only has one high low leaver on the front and it uses a mechanical clutch to engage and disengage drive to the chuck. I am getting close to having an apron that can be modified to work with the current saddle and it is defiantly the original saddle. the compound and cross slide are perfect there is 0 back lash in them. I will start a thread on the restoration when it starts for anyone interested in following along. Mean while if anyone knows of or has spares they want to part with for a mid 40's Masters I would be more than interested.
    Cheers again for all the help
    regards
    Paul.
    I used to recommend a company called " Nobilla " in Stevenage in the UK. They specialise in " Colchester " lathe spares. Both new and used parts. I found them good to deal with and not too expensive in the past. Someone on here had dealt with them more recently and thought they'd become expensive but everything is relative.

    Regards Tyrone.


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