Identifying my old lathe
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    Default Identifying my old lathe

    Hello. I have bought an old lathe and now I need help to find out what type and brand it is. unable to find any letters or numbers on it. If there is a need for more pictures, just let me know. Thanks for the help
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20210913_213128.jpg   20210913_213055.jpg  

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    If you have lots of free time you could go to "Lathes UK" and scroll through their archives. There are hundreds of old machine tools with detailed information which I have used for researching old machines many times.

    Lathes + Machine Tool Archive

    Dave

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    The sharp right angles on top of the apron seem out of place on such a rounded streamlined lathe. That feature may help identify it. What is the spindle nose? thread or cam lock? take a out a non critical bolt or nut and see if it is metric or English thread.
    Bill D

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    One feature that implies a British mfg is that the carriage handwheel is to the right on the apron. American manufacturers favored left so you can look more manly with all the hot chip scars on your left hand, I presume.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TGTool View Post
    One feature that implies a British mfg is that the carriage handwheel is to the right on the apron. American manufacturers favored left so you can look more manly with all the hot chip scars on your left hand, I presume.
    Not really. It was because Brits had sense enough to engage power surfacing feed, stand back, Light up a Capstan or Players cigarette and relax instead of sweating like a pig under a shower of hot chips.. Then retract and restart from a position to the right in comfort..

    Show-off behaviour was reserved for pint sized mugs. quart-sized jugs, and gallon-size lugs.

    Coming or going, it was meant to adhere to "British standard. Double handful" if you will.


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    Thanks I'll have a look ��

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    Hi. The spindel nose are thread. I took out one of the bolts and the threads are Whitworth 12G

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    Its a removable block gap bed - probably why it has "wrong hand" carriage

    FF - any lettering on doors on the cabinet legs?

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    Its a removable block gap bed - probably why it has "wrong hand" carriage

    FF - any lettering on doors on the cabinet legs?
    No I can't find anything. The diagrams on the lathe is German writing. ( Laitspindel steigung, Hebel stellung, Vorschübe beim I angdrehen = 1/10 der Gewindesteigungen )

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    Quote Originally Posted by FluxFace View Post
    No I can't find anything. The diagrams on the lathe is German writing. ( Laitspindel steigung, Hebel stellung, Vorschübe beim I angdrehen = 1/10 der Gewindesteigungen )

    Well, that might be a clue on working in a smaller search space.

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    You could try these pages to see if you get a match
    Oscar Ehrlich Lathes
    Fischer Lathes
    I it has been a while since I looked at them .
    Also try a Forum Search of this forum for Erlich and Fischer
    There are some other threads on them that may show some other similar models or leads to other makers.
    Jim

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Christie View Post
    You could try these pages to see if you get a match
    Oscar Ehrlich Lathes
    Fischer Lathes
    I it has been a while since I looked at them .
    Also try a Forum Search of this forum for Erlich and Fischer
    There are some other threads on them that may show some other similar models or leads to other makers.
    Jim
    I have tried searching through the forum and I have seen the sites you referred to, but I cannot find anything similar to my lathe. Oscar Ehrlich lathes have some parts that are similar to the parts on my lathe

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    To me whitworth thread means it was British made not USA and not European. But, I am no expert on European machine tools.
    Bill D

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    Germans also used Whitworth thread pre 1930s for some things....Mauser rifles have the barrel tennon as a Whitworth thread form,and all the other threads in a 1939-45 Mauser K98k are inch threads.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TGTool View Post
    One feature that implies a British mfg is that the carriage handwheel is to the right on the apron. American manufacturers favored left so you can look more manly with all the hot chip scars on your left hand, I presume.

    Yeah but American gap bed lathes, such as a South Bend, had their hand wheel on the right as well.

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