Interesting K&E folding ruler/scale - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    No, I never got around to checking it yet, but I should. Just have to find the UV light, which was the problem last time I thought about it also. I just ran across it in a toolbox drawer of anti-cues, and here you-all bring it up again.

    At the price I paid, it does not really matter what it is made of.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by JST View Post
    I don;t know the material of the body segments, if old enough could be ivory, I suppose, otherwise some form of celluloid, perhaps.

    Anyone know more about it?
    Not sure about that one. The oldest K&E I ever owned was only from the 1930's. The lettering alone suggests your one is much older.

    The material on mine was Cellulose Nitrate plastic over Mahogany. Famously non-yellowing and easily cleaned in its day, but not otherwise the safest of materials to process whilst actually making workaday plastics. See Cinema film, more than 'guncotton'.


  3. #23
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    A couple of pages from my 35th Edition Keuffel & Esser Catalog..1915.

    I didn't see any "Ivorine Scale" folding rules but as you can see it existed even in 1915.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 100_4449.jpg   100_4450.jpg  

  4. #24
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    JST..having gone through my collection of folding rules picked up over the last forty years I found NONE being made of man made material. They are Box Wood or a variety of cheaper woods..bone and Ivory.This is based on the thirty or so folders I have.

  5. #25
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    The #1720 on the first page is very nearly a description of this rule.

  6. #26
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    I obtained a geologists UV source, with long and short wave filters. Checked the rule with it.

    The "long and short" of it seem to be that there is no fluorescence at all, and it is most likely the "ivorine" material, which may be a celluloid type. Similar material was used into the 1950s, often on slide rules, over bamboo etc, so it could easily be fairly recent.

    I do not think it is a coating over wood, though, seems translucent.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by JST View Post
    I obtained a geologists UV source, with long and short wave filters. Checked the rule with it.

    The "long and short" of it seem to be that there is no fluorescence at all, and it is most likely the "ivorine" material, which may be a celluloid type. Similar material was used into the 1950s, often on slide rules, over bamboo etc, so it could easily be fairly recent.

    I do not think it is a coating over wood, though, seems translucent.
    Not a lot of "maybe" to it. Cellulose Nitrate. Laminated. Expertly so. Very. "World beater" class at it K&E were, that era.

    My first exposure had been Dad's basic Mannheim-pattern 25 cm slide rule he'd used at Marshall College, 1926 onward.

    There was a write-up on the material "back in the day", as K&E WERE early adopter experts at laminating it to wood in a seriously enduring and stable marriage. One of the several Mahogany tribes, in the case of that slide rule. Must have been a seriously good job of matching thermal & hygroscopic characteristics.

    My replacement or "upgrade" was the more complex K&E Log-Log-Duplex-Decitrig in SOLID plastic.

    It was never as smooth to operate on its best days as the older composite one remained 40 years on, and it DID "yellow" even if only ever-so-slightly!


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  9. #28
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    I think K & E simply applied their brand name to Rabone protractors. Probably very rare. See about 2/3 of the way down this page: https://www.sliderulemuseum.com/Rarities.htm They call this a slide rule, but it sure looks similar.rabone_jointrule_nathanzeldescollection.jpg

    K&E has been around for over 150 years, making surveying instruments, slide rules, scales, all kinds of measuring tools.

    Dan

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  11. #29
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    It "has" a protractor feature, but it has as its main function, measurement. And, yes, Rabone made it, and K&E put their name on it, without bothering to remove the Rabone name.

    It is almost surely plastic material of some sort, solid through. There is no external evidence anywhere of it being laminated, and it appears partly translucent, so nothing opaque is in it as far as I can tell.

    I have no idea when these were discontinued, but there is no evidence on it of when it was made, other than its construction and materials, marking style, etc. Could have been made the day before they quit making them or it could have been made the week after they started making them that way.


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