Kearney & Trecker CNC Model MM-200C
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  1. #1
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    Default Kearney & Trecker CNC Model MM-200C

    Kearney & Trecker CNC Model MM-200C

    Looking for a range of value on this machine and year of manufacture. I found a good site that lists older machines and some history, but no information on this model. Any help would be appreciated.

  2. #2
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    K&t has been gone a long time. Value zero to negative.

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    MM is for Milwaukee Matic - possibly an old tape control version - and fifty plus years old

    (the lot book shows them selling numerous examples in 1964)
    Last edited by johnoder; 01-08-2020 at 10:20 AM.

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    CNC years are like dog years also.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    There's a guy been trying to sell a five-axis one, running, in southern California for maybe two years. He wanted ten grand.

    The 200's came with maybe a B but definitely a C and a D control. C was a PDP-8 with a bunch of their own cards added, D was their own control. They have roller bearing ways, not balls. Generally dual pallet. The Z axis is the column. You could get them with anywhere from 40 tools to a hundred maybe, in KT straight shank or 50 taper. They had a deal where the control read the toolholders, you just stuck them in the chain then ran it past the reader once and the control then knew which tool was where. I don't remember the horsepower but it was substantial - these were from the days when you cut metal, not scared it off. As I remember it was a two-speed gearbox o the spindle, top speed maybe 5,000 rpm. Gettys axis and spindle drives. The work envelope is about 24" in all three axes. They made the same machine into a 600 just by enlarging the travels, but all the parts were about the same. 800 was a jump in base size. Ours had hard drives and connections for a dnc system with reporting and program management, tool management, all that but we didn't have the central computer for it. Wasn't a DEC but something contemporary to that. The stack of reels for the exec came up to about my waist. 192k of memory ! (plus the scsi hard disk, maybe a gigabyte ...)

    I still think the control is far and away better than anything else I've seen (Fanuc sucks ) but alas, hundreds of ic's in sockets is not good for reliability. One silly little feature I liked was, the control would dynamically pick up offsets. You could single block with, say, a countersink. Start with the sink too far out then change the offset and the control would pick that up even at an end of block and go to the new offset at the previous feedrate. Obviously you left the spindle running ... Was cool for countersinks. All kinds of useful features for an operator, the control made sense. It was a picnic to follow the ladder on-screen, made troubleshooting very easy. The documentation was great, you could actually build the control from the prints that came with it, if you were nuts.

    They would be mid-seventies to mid-eighties, I am guessing ? That's pretty close anyhow.

    It's probably worth scrap, unless you had another one and wanted spares.

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    If you look up K&T on VintageMachinery.org they have a ton
    of literature on these. Like a CNC DeVleige would you say???

    -Doozer

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    Anyone who wants an older HMC can take their pick for dirt cheap. I looked at a 630MM late 90's Mori that needed a minor repair for around the $10k mark recently and I know a guy that got a 400MM 90's Mori for basically nothing a few months ago.

    HMC's aren't hobby stuff. 40+ HP spindles and 30-60,000 lbs rules out most garages and small shops. I have a little pocket sized Kitamura H300 HMC. Probably the smallest little fully functional pallet changing HMC made and it's still 14,000 lbs.

    If that K&T has decent tombstones on it those are probably worth way way more than the machine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doozer View Post
    Like a CNC DeVleige would you say???
    Not exactly, Devliegs are more of a cnc horizontal boring mill. The K&T is just like the hmc's sold today. Plus the tool changer on the K&T actually works

    Devliegs are pretty spiffy tho, in their own way.

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