Kuhlmann pantograph question
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    Default Kuhlmann pantograph question

    Anyone out there have a manual for a Kuhlmann GM 1-1 pantograph? I have most of the operation figured out but one part isn't making sense. The lever on the side of the spindle lowers and raises the spindle by probably 1/4" or so when thrown. The ring that the lever is part of lowers the spindle a much smaller amount when rotated. It seems like the ring above it with the scale should rotate with it, but it doesn't. Sorry about the sideways pics.
    20200119_115017.jpg
    20200119_115003.jpg

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    The ring with the scale is used to set how much extra the cutter moves when the lever is rotated.
    It doesn't move with the lever but should rotate to set the required down distance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jwatts View Post
    Anyone out there have a manual for a Kuhlmann GM 1-1 pantograph? I have most of the operation figured out but one part isn't making sense. The lever on the side of the spindle lowers and raises the spindle by probably 1/4" or so when thrown. The ring that the lever is part of lowers the spindle a much smaller amount when rotated. It seems like the ring above it with the scale should rotate with it, but it doesn't. Sorry about the sideways pics.
    20200119_115017.jpg
    20200119_115003.jpg
    Plate Engraving Corp in Medina OH is the is USA Kuhlmann rep. 330-239-2155. They should be able to help. I have not contacted them in a number of years and assume they are still there. They gave me a copy of the manual for my SU2 cutter grinder.

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    Yep, still there, just west of Sharon Center.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rustytool View Post
    The ring with the scale is used to set how much extra the cutter moves when the lever is rotated.
    It doesn't move with the lever but should rotate to set the required down distance.
    Right about 60-61 years & .88/hr min wage, but memory sez the smaller (and already old..) Gorton we used to modify molded hearing aid cases to clear parts revisions when required worked much the same way.

    Short depth, we'd thumb & finger the ring alone, one part to the next. 'bout a sixth or twelfth of a turn?

    So JF try it out.

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    A similar ring on my Deckel GK-21 controls the up-down movement of the spindle in small increments. I have a post that fits on the pattern table and locks the pantograph arms. I then can do precision milling on small objects.

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    Just saw a very nice looking Kuhlmann on Facebook for sale for dirt cheap...$395. Seller Mark Yax in Mentor, Ohio.

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    Thanks for the replies guys, I'll have to see how it affects the plunge depth and I'll get in touch with Plate Engraving Corp. Thanks again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jwatts View Post
    Thanks for the replies guys, I'll have to see how it affects the plunge depth and I'll get in touch with Plate Engraving Corp. Thanks again.
    "Damned LITTLE". Eyeball the exposed threads.

    Diameter is whatever it needs to be, but the pitch isn't usually all that far-off what is used on Micrometer heads, and rotation can be but a scant few degrees.

    Real-world use even as a new kid I could cut hearing aid PCB traces slick as Owl poop, eight hours a day with that Gorton dinosaurian.

    Even by the tail-end of the 1950's a behind-the-ear hearing aid PCB was only about the size -and even shape - of an ignorant kidney bean, flat-sectioned. Mic, reproducer, and Silver-cell battery took up MOST of the space.

    My present-day weapon of choice for intricate milling? Salvaged H.B.Preise Panto-engraver with good multi-axis control. All manual.

    Wanted basic text and artwork data plates? I can order those cheap enough online, "CNC'ed", hot-stamped, or "Metalphoto", artwork right off the Pee Cee, and fast.

    Panto-engraver is for "the harder stuff". Literally, what with die-grinder heads mounted.

    Template need not even be metal.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    Just saw a very nice looking Kuhlmann on Facebook for sale for dirt cheap...$395. Seller Mark Yax in Mentor, Ohio.
    Could you post a link?

    Seems to be gone.

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    I spoke with Mike at Plate Engraving yesterday and he was very helpful. Not only was I able to get a copy of the manual, but he said they also have some collets in stock. I don't think they are cheap, but at least they exist. I'll probably end up getting at least one since my machine came with some sort of collet shaped insert designed for tools with a tapered shank.

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    A lot of the old pantographs used a tapered shank cutter. I have/use some adapters that go from that taper to 1/8” held in a collet with nut. Mostly I use 1/8” shank endmills. This is on Deckel #GO, the baby bench top Deckel.

    Both Deckel and Gordon made those adaptors.

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    Has anyone had the table off of one of these? I initially thought you could remove the screw and then slide it off the end, but the table is closed on the ends and as such is captive because of the fixed nut underneath.

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    If it's like a Deckel GK21 you have to reach up from underneath with an hex wrench and remove the nut.

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    Unfortunately there's no access for that. Not sure if I did it the "right" way but ultimately was able to get it off. The Y axis is connected to the screw somewhat oddly via an offset nut/bracket. With that removed, both axes can slide off the front. Once upside down the X axis nut can be removed and the two axes separated. If anyone else needs to remove the tables, the nut/bracket connecting the Y axis to the screw is attached with two socket head cap screws and two pins. The pins are taper pins and there's no access to drive them out. I'm not sure how it's meant to be done, but some judicious prying got it apart.


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