Kwik-Way machine (was Did my first bores tonight.) - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by alum100k View Post
    If the bar's platform and the deck is straight, the centering fingers start below the piston wear. It is a reach into the original bore. There is a lot of ovality and wear bias above, which influence centering.
    I've heard 3 different things on this. I've heard right above the top piston rings after removing the carbon, middle, and bottom.

    I think I agree with you at the bottom. The top is probably the most distorted from combustion and would expect it to warp there the most if it gets hot.


    The middle gets twice the wear than a top or bottom as the cylinder passes it twice.


    The bottom, below where the piston touches seems most logical. Also the only place I was able to get a straight bore during practice.


    My deck was definitely dirty; I wasn't thinking. I'll clean up the other deck and try again.


    Bought a new shaft for the handle. $400 mistake, but part of it. Also bought many cutters and offsets to go with it. Should be good to go.

    Sent from my GM1917 using Tapatalk

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  3. #22
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    Good and you are one of those guys who keep at it. Your fresh experience and being right there, teaches me. There were clamping methods, attachments. I'm looking forward to reading about the newer tools and cutting bits' performance.

  4. #23
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    One thing on the centering fingers , they have probably been well used in there lifetime in my shop I occasionally lap the fingers in to a bored cylinder
    Do not loosen the clamp , put some med valve grinding compound on the fingers put pressure out to center a hand rotate the bar. Of course this don’t work if the centering fingers don’t rotate.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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  6. #24
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    That means you know way more about them, in use. I only have a couple of "bars" The Lempco ( early Rottler) has the kit, the Van Norman doesn't. The Kwik Way and Storm Vulcan are more complicated and better if you know how to use them.

  7. #25
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    You mentioned buying different cutters? Lacey Williams sells cutters that use replaceable inserts with different cutting geometry than original kwikway. When they get dull you just change the cutting edge. Guys like you, just starting out, usually like those better than the old ones that you lap to sharpen. One of the problems with the original kwikway cutters was when you lap them the centerline of the cutting edge changes and if you don't reset the mike it will bore oversize to the mike setting! Most guys use one cutter, set to the mike for the finish cut. The others for roughing. When I had a quikway I never paid attention to the mike size setting. I would check the bore with a bore gauge and adjust the cutter with the mike to the next cut. If I was .005 under I just set the mike .005 bigger and set the tool. Some bars would bore small in the smaller bores and bore over on the bigger sizes, you will figure that out with experience? Trusting the bore gauge and not the mike eliminates those concerns.

    It's been mentioned by others how much they leave for honing. Everybody has their opinions? I have found that the "threads" left by the cutter are about a 1/2-3/4 of a thousandth deep and since I'm somewhat lazy and don't like to hone alot, I leave a little over .001 for honing. The hone will "sing" on the threads, when the singing stops the threads are gone, a couple more strokes of the hone and you will be to size. When you leave more to hone the bore can heat up and enlarge and after cooling you may have to hone again to get your finished size. Again these things you will learn with experience.

  8. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Servicar rider View Post
    You mentioned buying different cutters? Lacey Williams sells cutters that use replaceable inserts with different cutting geometry than original kwikway. When they get dull you just change the cutting edge. Guys like you, just starting out, usually like those better than the old ones that you lap to sharpen. One of the problems with the original kwikway cutters was when you lap them the centerline of the cutting edge changes and if you don't reset the mike it will bore oversize to the mike setting! Most guys use one cutter, set to the mike for the finish cut. The others for roughing. When I had a quikway I never paid attention to the mike size setting. I would check the bore with a bore gauge and adjust the cutter with the mike to the next cut. If I was .005 under I just set the mike .005 bigger and set the tool. Some bars would bore small in the smaller bores and bore over on the bigger sizes, you will figure that out with experience? Trusting the bore gauge and not the mike eliminates those concerns.

    It's been mentioned by others how much they leave for honing. Everybody has their opinions? I have found that the "threads" left by the cutter are about a 1/2-3/4 of a thousandth deep and since I'm somewhat lazy and don't like to hone alot, I leave a little over .001 for honing. The hone will "sing" on the threads, when the singing stops the threads are gone, a couple more strokes of the hone and you will be to size. When you leave more to hone the bore can heat up and enlarge and after cooling you may have to hone again to get your finished size. Again these things you will learn with experience.
    I talked to the guy about the newer style inserts. He said they work, but said it would be best to just learn how to work with the original cutters and how to lap them. Lapping them doesn't seem too bad and should last a long time.

    I think I like honing as little as possible for now. I don't have a fancy honing machine, and am using the Lisle 15000 on a drill for now.

    I saw how easy it was to get the bores out of whack with a hone. I had about .003 OOR after honing a cylinder that was pretty straight.

    Guy is shipping out my parts today. I'm probably going to give a small write-up on what's going on. I had the bar apart a bit (part of the handwheel fell down in the transmission so I opened it up to get it and looked around while I was there. Pretty simple set up. Used dog clutches to select the gears.

    Sent from my GM1917 using Tapatalk

  9. #27
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    I've gotten a world of good out of my Van Norman boring bar, not so much in the last few years, but have saved several blocks by using the Van Norman to bore it for putting a sleeve in the block. I was able to get a manual right after getting it, very good information and lets you take advantage of the clever design features.

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  11. #28
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    Be careful about stone pressure when honing, light is better even strokes and not being in a hurry= straight bores. I have had several kwikways over the years, presently using a van Norman 944s & a 777s. I agree they are very good machines!

  12. #29
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    I agree on the non inserted bits that you lap. Ive had many boring bars over the years and even the newer ones yiu can get a better finish on the lapped bits. Experiment with the angles you can get a very smooth finish
    I run a Rottler f84 now big machine, variable feeds and spindle speed. They supply their “special “ inserts with it. When they demo them the spin the crap out of them feed fast looks impressive but eats inserts if you slow it down with their inserts it can get chatter in deep holes. I still lap/ grind my inserts sharp and no chatter and i can run at a sfm that dont eat up inserts. Have fun keep learning!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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