large Reed vise No. 108 R
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    143
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Default large Reed vise No. 108 R

    I recently brought home a large Reed machinists vise. I have been looking for one of these monsters for awhile. The jaws are 8" wide, 30" long overall and it weighs about 250 lbs. Only a baby!

    http://i580.photobucket.com/albums/s...a/P1010003.jpg
    http://i580.photobucket.com/albums/s...vizza/knob.jpg
    http://i580.photobucket.com/albums/s...vizza/jaws.jpg

    It's had a hard life. Now that its in my shop it can retire. The jaws are pretty beat up and rounded. I can't see any way to remove the jaws. Are the jaws replaceable on these vises?

    It also seems to be missing a nut or collar that keeps the screw in the movable jaw. Does anyone have any details on this?

    I am looking forward to what Carla has to say about this vise.


    Thanks

    Dan

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    West Virginia
    Posts
    4,215
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    579

    Default

    I think there should be a C-shaped collar that attaches to the movable jaw with a bolt and drops down over the screw to keep it in place. I don't have any Reeds here but we have two in the shop, and that's what I remember.
    Andy

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Roseville, CA
    Posts
    3,857
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    27
    Likes (Received)
    20

    Default

    I could well be wrong about this, but I think the jaws on my Reed are a separate part made of steel, but hard to see the line demarking the cast iron body and the jaws. Will have to take a close look tomorrow and maybe can post a photo.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Metuchen, NJ, USA
    Posts
    5,498
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4442
    Likes (Received)
    925

    Default

    "It also seems to be missing a nut or collar that keeps the screw in the movable jaw."

    The correct term for that collar is "the garter", spelled the same way as the garter that a lady uses to hold up her stockings. This piece is often cast and gets shattered when the vise gets dropped on its nose. My feeling is that a well-made non-authentic plate-steel replacement is an upgrade, pure and simple.

    See, the old gal really did live a hard life; she lost her garter! (You didn't think a vise like that would spend her life in some genteele shop like a watch factory, did you? This was in a two-fisted kind of a place like a mine. steel mill, or a railroad shop.)

    The jaws are almost certainly replaceable. They may be screwed in place or dovetailed and pinned. In the latter case, the pins are exposed but ground/filed flush with the outside surfaces of the jaws.

    Several other correspondents on PM have advocated using a shaper to make vise jaws.
    But, yours don't really look like they need replacement, at least not judging by the photos you posted.

    I think this is the second-largest vise posted on PM since I joined. Does the 250 lb weight include that stand?

    JRR

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    247
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    48
    Likes (Received)
    55

    Default

    Dan, that vise also has a method of holding the nut tight in the base. The nut has a vee in it and an adjusting screw to tighten it down. That feature is what the patent is for. Interesting expanation for the "garter". Mine, on my 6 inch, looks cast with a vee running at right angles across the face, with the threads turned on it. After casting and threading, the garter/nut was split down this vee, which allowed both halves to be placed past the boss on the handle and turned into the nose of the moving jaw. Once they go in a thread they turn as a single piece. When in deep you would turn them with a hook or pin spanner as I recall. Screw on the side is to retain this garter/nut. Lots of elegant, simple engineering in these Reeds. Call the factory, who knows what they have laying around for parts. I have seen their catalogues from the sixties with this style of vise in them. Bill Scheer

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Metuchen, NJ, USA
    Posts
    5,498
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4442
    Likes (Received)
    925

    Default

    Dan and Bill,

    AFAIK, the word "garter" applies only to the collar right behind the handle. This collar makes the moveable jaw come along as the screw is unscrewed. The ones I recall are really only a half-collar, kinda like a rounded Y.

    I can't quite envison what Bill is describing. A photo would be very helpful.

    One of the most annoying things I've ever seen happen at a Flea Market was that I bent down to examine a beautiful old classic bench vise on the ground and saw it was 100% intact, then came by the same vendor later and saw the vise had been carelessly dropped and the garter was broken. I can sort of understand someopne picking up the vise to examine it, but dropping it and then walking away was unconscionable. I'd say the turkey who did that should have been forced to pay the vendor's full asking price right on the spot.

    JRR

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    143
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Default

    I think I know what you mean by a "garter". Parker vises generally have them. However, I think this vise uses a threaded ring or collar to retain the screw. This picture should help clarify.

    http://i580.photobucket.com/albums/s...vizza/hole.jpg

    The first 1/2" of the hole is threaded. Although the threads on the bottom are worn away. There is also a set screw. Due to the damaged threads I doubt even the original parts would work.

    I have a few ideas that would get the vise working again. But its nice to know how its supposed to be.

    The vise itself minus the stand weighs about 250 lbs. I weighed the separate parts of it unscientifically on my old bathroom scale. So who knows what it actually weighs.


    Since I'm not planning to do any watchmaking anytime soon I will just leave the jaws alone.

    Dan

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Gloucester Pt. VA
    Posts
    118
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    67
    Likes (Received)
    95

    Default

    Dan,
    I have a very similar Reed vise, but with a swivel base, in my shop . I will try to get some pictures this weekend for you.

    Mike

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Shandaken, NY, USA
    Posts
    4,635
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1506
    Likes (Received)
    7888

    Default

    John Ruth is correct about the term "garter". It is used in mechanical work to describe a variety of similar components. The most common usage is the "garter spring" used to keep a lip type seal snug around a rod or shaft.

    Athol also used a similar type of garter to hold the vise screw in place in the moveable jaw when opening the vise. Athol used more of a wire spring-clip that engaged a groove on the shank of the vise screw.

    A few years back, I found a 3 1/2" Athol vise along the roadside in a pile for metal pick-up. It was not beat up, but the garter was missing. I suppose I could have made an effort to size up a circlip to replace the missing garter. What I did instead was to machine a shaft collar. I bored the collar to a good fit on the shank of the vise screw, and tapped it for two setscrews at 90 degrees. The groove for the garter was too close to the inner face of the movable jaw to catch with the setscrews. I used a ball end mill to make a couple of very shallow dimples in the shank of the vise screw (figuring the ball end mill would not create the kind of stress risers or discontinuity that a drilled dimple would). The collar I made had to have some milled relief flats on it to fit into the pocket in the jaw casting.

    The overall repair is hidden & works fine. Rather than chase around trying to hunt down the correct garter (or trying to make one), perhaps this idea of a shaft collar would work on your Reed Vise.

    I am unsure about Reed's designs of vises. Some of the machinist vises used a "crowfoot" to retain the vise screw in the movable jaw. The crowfoot (my choice of term since it looks like a crowfoot wrench) looks somewhat like a shifter fork in a geared transmission.

    The crowfoot was located between the "ball" at the end of the vise screw and the body of the moveable jaw. A groove was machined into the shank of the vise screw, and the crowfoot entered this groove. The crowfoot was secured to the front of the moveable jaw by a capscrew. It was a more expensive way to go about making a vise, and required a bit more meat in the front of the moveable jaw casting to make a pad for the crowfoot.
    I think most of the machinist vise manufacturers got away from the crowfoot in favor of using some sort of garter. It saved quite a bit of machining, and popped right into place on the shank of the vise screw. The heavier duty vises from the old-line makers like Prentiss tended to stay with the crowfoot. I have a "Simplex" 4 1/2" vise on my bench in my home shop. It has the crowfoot. I have a new/unused Columbian 4 1/2" swivel base combination vise (new in '72, a virgin ever since). It has the same crowfoot.

    I may be off base on this, but I think Reed used to incorporate the steel jaw plates into the castings of the jaws. The jaws were likely cast of a "semi steel" or malleable iron alloy. The patterns for the jaw castings likely had what the patternmakers call a "core print" on them to provide space in the mold for the jaw plates. The jaw plates likely had some kind of serrated projection that stuck into the mold cavity. When the molds were poured, the molten iron incorporated the serrated projection on the jaw plate. As the casting cooled and the iron shrank, it tended to really lock the jaw plates in. I do not know what alloy steel or process Reed or the other makers used for these "imbedded" jaw plates. Suffice it to say they are generally quite hard, despite the slow cooling of the castings that incorporated them.

    I have not seen too many Reed vises. I used to see them more in old powerplants, maintainence shops, weld shops, or heavy equipment and truck garages. Usually, the old Reed vises had taken a beating externally, but were still fine. Reed was (and still is) known for their pipe tools- wrenches, pipe vises, and similar. I think because of this, the Reed vises tended to find their way into the powerplants and maintainence shops where piepfitting and boiler repairs were more the daily work. I think Reed made about the heaviest duty machinist vises in the USA.

    Joe Michaels

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    247
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    48
    Likes (Received)
    55

    Default

    JRR and Dan, if Mike is unable to post pictures of his I will take shots of my collar/garter this weekend as soon as I have access to the camera. Which is code for talking my wife into taking them, as I can't figure out how to make the new one work. Bill Scheer

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    143
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Default

    Bill, your description of the split nut/garter makes sense. I can visualize how it would work on my vise. Similar to how the nut in a Jacobs chuck works. I did look up the patent for the nut adjustment. I will have to take a closer look at that feature.

    I just spotted this on Ebay.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/Large-4-Reed-Bench-Vise-204R-Machinist-Heavy-Nice_W0QQitemZ140299640900QQcmdZViewItemQQptZClamp s_Vises?hash=item140299640900&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14 &_trkparms=72%3A1205|66%3A2|65%3A12|39%3A1|240%3A1 318|301%3A1|293%3A1|294%3A50

    The vise is complete with the original garter.

    Joe, good idea about using a shaft collar. The threads in the vise are very beat up, so I doubt the original nut would work anyway. I am thinking of a split collar that's not threaded and held in place with the set screw.

    Thanks again everyone.

    Dan

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Gloucester Pt. VA
    Posts
    118
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    67
    Likes (Received)
    95

    Default

    Dan,

    My vise is a 208 not a 108R what ever that means. It has a swivel base and is 32" long. As you can see the screw is retained by a collar with set screw in the bottom cavity of the moveable jaw. As mentioned earlier the jaws appear to be cast in place with the body of the vise. My vise is apart so I can clean and paint it. It is also apart so I can move it! I can barely lift the moveable jaw by itself. I doubt I'll be needing a bigger vise! Hope this helps.

    Mike
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails reed-bottom-sm.jpg   reed-side-1-sm.jpg   reed-side-2-sm.jpg  

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    247
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    48
    Likes (Received)
    55

    Default

    Mike, this is an older model Reed, guessing from the early part of the century, which does not have the features we are talking about, but is still a worthy vise. The handle is held on in the industry standard manner. I have a 4 inch like this with "Pat'd Dec 24, 1912" stamped in the top of the stationary jaw, not cast in the body, mounted on an old cast iron bench grinder stand on a wheeled base. Goes anywhere and is the most used vise I have. Bill S.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    143
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Default

    The repair of the vise was a success! Here's what I came up with.

    http://i580.photobucket.com/albums/s...a/DSC_2387.jpg
    http://i580.photobucket.com/albums/s...a/DSC_2388.jpg


    I machined a new garter out of steel. I drilled a small hole in it, sawed through one side of the hole and the opposite side of the garter. The edges of the kerf were given a chamfer. I heated it up with a torch, bent it open and closed it onto the vise screw. After inserting the screw into the vise, I tightened the pointed set screw expanding the garter into place. It should have a very positive grip due to the old threads and the rough turned finish. I hope that makes sense.

    I also had to make a 3/4" thick washer to shim the vise handle out to where it should be. The vise suffered wear from a major lack of oil. I had to vacuum out a pile of fine cast iron dust deep inside the vise presumably caused by this wear.

    Mike U, I would love to see a pic of that vise when you get it all cleaned up and reassembled. It looks like a good one!

    Thanks again everyone.

    Dan

  15. Likes NC Rick liked this post

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •