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Thread: Lathe on a Jeep

  1. #21
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    A picture of the "Rzeppa universal joint mentioned by Joe Michaels is shown here .
    Commercial catalogs collection. Timken-Detroit Axle Co. Handbook of motor vehicles used by the United States Armed Forces. 1944.. - Full View | HathiTrust Digital Library | HathiTrust Digital Library
    From this book I posted links to in other threads.
    Timken-Detroit Axle Co. Handbook of motor vehicles used by the United States Armed Forces. 1944..
    Jeep shown here
    Commercial catalogs collection. Timken-Detroit Axle Co. Handbook of motor vehicles used by the United States Armed Forces. 1944.. - Full View | HathiTrust Digital Library | HathiTrust Digital Library
    I looked for mobile machine shops but don’t see any .
    Regards,
    Jim

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  3. #22
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    Some Discussion about other bearings in the Jeep here starting here in the book Timken at War.
    Timken at war, - PT Search - Full View | HathiTrust Digital Library | HathiTrust Digital Library
    see page 124 the other link won't save for me .
    Jim

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  5. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy FitzGibbon View Post
    I know what Myfords look like. This doesn't look like one. Compare, among many other small differences, the size and shape of the bed foot.

    This type of single-foot utility lathe was fairly common in Britain, as a look through Tony's site will attest. Quite a few manufacturers made a machine of this style.

    Andy
    It is not a Myford. The machine has a foot at the end of the bed...
    Zyto and Portass sold lathes in that form, and many others.

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  7. #24
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    Or for those who prefer a little more comfort how about a lathe in a Chevy Before The Internet – South Bend Lathe Co. Salesman’s Cars | The Old Motor

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    Or for those who prefer a little more comfort how about a lathe in a Chevy Before The Internet – South Bend Lathe Co. Salesman’s Cars | The Old Motor
    Now that's cool.

    Can you imagine if similar salesmanship survived today? I mean, sure we have the guys squirting cleaner on your porch windows, and your various flavors of tooling reps, but imagine a dealer driving around with a Mazak or Haas built into the back of a bob-tail truck. He pulls right up to your door and shows you what their machines can do.

    In some ways, it promotes a good reputation. If a company can literally pedal their machine around on their own dime, they shouldn't have any reservations helping you with applications or getting parts and service to you. At least when you put on the rose-colored consumer goggles....

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    Beaver Machine Tools had to use modified vans to sell their turret mills in the 50's Beaver Machine Tool History

  11. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    Beaver Machine Tools had to use modified vans to sell their turret mills in the 50's Beaver Machine Tool History
    Blimey, looks like too much mill in not enough van!

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  13. #28
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    The lathe looks a bit like a "Mars" lathe made in Brisbane, Australia. The Mars has some differences like a feed drive shaft as well as the leadscrew, which the jeep mounted unit doesn't have:
    Mars Lathes

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  15. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Demon73 View Post
    Blimey, looks like too much mill in not enough van!
    Not much Demon, those Beavers were bloody heavy and at the most the old Morris LD's were 1.5 Imp ton payload (3360lbs for our US cousins)

    Morris LD LD Van

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  17. #30
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    Great War era- Drummond 5" lathes were used in ASC mobile workshops. A truly brilliant, capable and incredibly versatile lathe.

    WW1 mobile Workshops - Pre WW2 vehicles - HMVF - Historic Military Vehicles Forum

    Travelling Workshops

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  19. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    Not much Demon, those Beavers were bloody heavy and at the most the old Morris LD's were 1.5 Imp ton payload (3360lbs for our US cousins)

    Morris LD LD Van
    You forgot to mention the vans were gutless, it would have been a slow journey.

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  21. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenwud View Post
    You forgot to mention the vans were gutless, it would have been a slow journey.
    Tell me about it, I had one of the 2.2 BMC diesels in a series 1 86'' Land Rover(that said - at the time it was a better engine than the Landy diesel) …………let me tell you, one handles 55BHP with respect, ..one false move with the throttle and it will be away from you.

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    [QUOTE=Greenwud;3342451]Great War era- Drummond 5" lathes were used in ASC mobile workshops. A truly brilliant, capable and incredibly versatile lathe.

    Hmm. Myford/Drummond M type?

    Archive: lathes.co.uk

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    [QUOTE=jim rozen;3342630]
    Quote Originally Posted by Greenwud View Post
    Great War era- Drummond 5" lathes were used in ASC mobile workshops. A truly brilliant, capable and incredibly versatile lathe.

    Hmm. Myford/Drummond M type?

    Archive: lathes.co.uk
    No, a 5" double-height bed machine. They are a totally different animal to the M type, which was barely a pipedream at the time of the Great War. Interesting features like two leadscrews, one for threadcutting and the other for feeds; double height bed which made the lathe incredibly capable and a range of accessories made specifically for automobile repair work.

    Tony has a page or two on the DH lathes.

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    I Like the set up, But no doubt the lathes position, gave the lathe operator a sore rear end after a few days! The hacksaw gives me the creeps, I would hazhard a guess the poor old lathe's bed ended up with a lot of cuts & dings. Time would not be of the essence with bullets liable to come flying along and your position possibly being infiltrated by angry Imperial Japanese soldiers, Life was not a picnic.

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  29. #36
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    Scrolling down to page 125 from the link I posted in post # 22 I noted the mention about Timken developing the bearings for what I believe were the Canadian Military Pattern Trucks
    There are several links about them on line
    5 Canadian-made military vehicles of the Second World War | Legion Magazine

    Southern Ontario Military Muster Vehicles - Southern Ontario Military Muster

    Canadian Military Pattern truck - Wikipedia

    I noticed a photo with a lathe in a mobile shop on a Canadian Military Pattern Truck at photo 142
    CMP 84
    Photo 143 will enlarge
    https://www.canadianmilitarypattern....0CMP%20143.jpg
    It looks to me like it might be a Sheldon lathe but I’m not 100% sure.
    Sheldon
    http://www.lathes.co.uk/sheldon/page2.html
    There was a similar Sheldon lathe on the this post 1945 mobile shop
    https://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...o-dscf3748.jpg
    that I posted about in this thread some time ago.
    Mobile Army Workshop at the Candain War Museum Ottawa, Ontario .

    If you scroll Scroll down to photo 214 and beyond to see one that is set up with a welder or generator of combination
    These will expand quite a bit to show details .
    https://www.canadianmilitarypattern....0CMP%20217.jpg
    This one clearly has the electrode holder for welding and shows the Lincoln Electric tag on the engine control panel
    https://www.canadianmilitarypattern....0CMP%20216.jpg
    I’m speculating that the welder engine may be a Ford flat head V8 but I imagine someone here will know for sure
    The pictures are a bit slow to load after viewing larger sizes at least for me .
    I noticed an interesting adaptation of a drill press here
    https://www.canadianmilitarypattern.com/Tools.html
    Possibly a potential use on other things for a drill like the one shown in this thread.
    FS parting out delta rockwell homecraft drill press
    There are some links about WW 1 mobile workshops in this older thread as well .
    WW1 Ordanance No 51 Mobile Workshop

    Regards,
    Jim

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  31. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    " .... and if you could coax it to go 50 mph you knew you were close to death.
    Agreed.... I drove one in a small town parade around 20 years ago, and when I headed it back to its home about 15 miles away, I could only get up to about 47 mph.

    Dan L

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    A big thank you to all who have contribuded. Very interesting stories here.
    A gigantic pool of memory here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Christie View Post

    If you scroll Scroll down to photo 214 and beyond to see one that is set up with a welder or generator of combination
    These will expand quite a bit to show details .
    https://www.canadianmilitarypattern....0CMP%20217.jpg
    This one clearly has the electrode holder for welding and shows the Lincoln Electric tag on the engine control panel
    https://www.canadianmilitarypattern....0CMP%20216.jpg
    I’m speculating that the welder engine may be a Ford flat head V8 but I imagine someone here will know for sure


    Regards,
    Jim
    I'm sure that's a Ford flat head V8, and ''pretty sure'' it's a Canadian model ( back in the day I was told they differed from the US built engines)


    If memory serves I last used one of those Canadian Ford V8 powered Lincolns around 1977, ………..and a mighty fine welder it was too.
    There were a lot 00's & 00's if not 000's shipped over here in prep for D day, and the Mulberry harbours etc etc etc, with most being sold off after the war (for nigh peanuts) and bought by all sorts of contractors, …………...along with it seemed as many spare engines as there were welders, …...many of which ended up as replacement car engines.

    FWIW, Those ''industrial pattern'' flat head V8's ran quite nicely on a mix of 50% cheapest lowest grade petrol (gasoline) and 50% paraffin (kerosene) which was and still is illegal on UK roads.

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    I notice the palm tree motif on the jeep. Not sure if it means North Africa or not but definitely tropical area of operation.


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