Lathe & Morse Maker lathe for sale on Facebook Marketplace.
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  1. #1
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    Default Lathe & Morse Maker lathe for sale on Facebook Marketplace.

    I think I can still reference things similarly to how we do Craigslist Listing.

    Here is the Facebook Marketplace link. 1888 Lathe & Morse metal lathe (heavy and large) - Antiques & Collectibles - Candia, New Hampshire | Facebook Marketplace

    Here is a picture which I'll bring up by bringing it to my computer first, and then uploading (for permanence and later reference.)



    This lathe I would put in the period from 1865 to 1871. It is in VERY good condition. Unfortunately missing a few parts but nothing which can't be found "out there."

    Seller is interesting in keeping it TOGETHER - as in he needs a buyer who APPRECIATES this kind of machine and is willing to take this one on as custodian. He will not part it out. His asking price seems negotiable to me, but I think you have to be the right buyer. This probably more important than the actual cash amount.

    Anyway, offered by him with my assist as we think alike in keeping what remains of our industrial history alive and functional.

    I would buy this one myself except I have two already - and I wish to stay married.

    Joe in NH

    Edit: Those who don't know. Facebook Marketplace is an adjunct to Facebook. You have to be a member of Facebook first, and prove yourself out as an "entity." (I.e. make a couple of friends, fill in all the blanks on who and what you are.) You then apply separately to Facebook Marketplace for membership. This usually takes a week or two to make it through the channels. (this prevents the one-shot spammers, so I'm told) Suddenly one day almost randomly you find you can actually get entry privilege on FB Marketplace. And then you're good to go.

    If someone here feels the need to move quick on this and are not a member, I can act as intermediary. But you'll have to make your own deal. The seller will want to evaluate YOU.

    J.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails facebook-l-m.jpg  

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    Most of the time I dont get excited about rusty old iron but this is a steal at 600 bucks, and in really good shape...would be a fun toy/tool...Phil

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    That lathe is pretty sexy.

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    That does look like a nice lathe... if all the parts were there I would be looking for a ride to get it home!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hit Miss Engine View Post
    That does look like a nice lathe... if all the parts were there I would be looking for a ride to get it home!
    The weight is there (all 114lbs of it) the correct toolpost is there. I'm not seeing many gears except for the ones that are on it. (There are 11 gears to do the complete range of threads presented by the gear chart. They're 12DP and not hard to find.) No steady rest - but the steady is generic - the only challenge is to get one that is 7-1/4 inches wide between the Vs which is wide compared to most modern.

    An original era chuck is included. Originals were Horton but any make of the period might have been made to fit. And still might.

    The frequently broken two ball tailstock clamp is all there. And you have all the original hand forged wrenches including the unusual one on the tool post.

    A downside might be found in the taper incorporated into the headstock and tailstock. My 1864ish clone has the unusual "American" or possibly a manufacturer's taper. The 1866ish clone has MT#2, which appears to be original - this was the time period when MT became popular. This lathe might be the earlier taper. So you'll constantly be turning drill arbors and other things to fit. Not a hold back necessarily but might even involve a certain "charm" of antiquity.

    Condition wise they don't get much better than this in the barn-find category. This one is actually better condition than either of my clones.

    Dunno. Get me away from this thing!

    Joe in NH

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    I see now there is no price in his listing...Phil

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    I'm seeing the $600 ask, still. "Listed 2 days ago in Candia, NH" right next to it. As I say though, "negotiable" at least according to him. According to his reply to me pricing was determined to be high enough to prevent a leg scrapper from stealing it. A wise move in my estimation. And negotiation gives him a fair amount of chance of "steering" the lathe to an interested buyer.

    It is worth preserving - but so are the two I already own just like it.

    There is one (L&M or clone) with a collector in California. There is one at the Waterviet Arsenal. There is one (18" swing) with a member of this board in East/Central Massachusetts. Another 18" with another collector outside of Boston Metro. There is one at the Zagray museum in CT. There is one in Westminster, VT nearly complete including hangers & tooling, but not as nice condition-wise. (Barns tend to raise havoc with condensation and consequent corrosion.) Another one with a Maine collector. And the early chain-drive in the Wilkinson Mill in Rhode Island. One "shortie" out west somewhere. Another set up with raising blocks in the Boston Metro Area. Another on raising blocks but used as a wood lathe in the Boston Metro. A later, post 1871 one I sold to buyer "Sampson" in Nova Scotia. A later, post 1871 now in Central Massachusetts with a nice video of that and its original countershaft on youtube. Possibly more I haven't mentioned.

    So they are out there. Lathe & Morse were among the first to claim "Lathes went around the world."

    Joe in NH

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    Joe, you can add my L&M to your list. It is an 18", 8' bed which came out of CT.

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    Quote Originally Posted by enginebill View Post
    Joe, you can add my L&M to your list. It is an 18", 8' bed which came out of CT.
    Sorry Bill, I knew about yours - I have your pix. Also another which came under another name in Philadelphia but you brought to our attention and which based on the visual is yet another 14 inch "clone." These lathes were very much like "peas in a pod." Small shop but doing VERY well controlled work. "Skillful machinists" would be the period term describing work done from a prototype by caliper and measure.

    Heh. Also an 18" which you commented on which had been converted to a wood lathe, but the carriage and headstock were part of the Craigslist deal and which might allow a "retroversion."

    And there is the 24" which is outside the machine shop in Maine. I should get over there someday for better pix as it is only about half an hour away from me.



    Thanks for the reminder.

    Joe in NH
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails lathe-outside-maine-machine-shop.jpg  

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    An update:

    It would appear that the lathe has a buyer - a member of this board and occasional contributor - and exactly what the seller was looking for. Another "Custodian."

    Thank you all for your interest and be assured that this lathe is SAVED.

    Best regards,
    Joe in NH

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    Joe, I would be interested in more pictures of the lathe in Maine, specifically the cross slide that is mounted to the carriage. It looks like a T slotted carriage with a bolt on cross slide which I have never seen before, could it be original? I have had two Betts lathes with T slotted carriages and I thought that they might be cylinder boring lathes but I have not been able to find definite proof. Could the bolt on cross slide been an accessory to a cylinder boring lathe?
    Thanks, Bill

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    Just got a phone call from a friend that he bought this lathe. It is now safe with him in NJ. Jake

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  20. #13
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    Joe,

    Tuckahoe Steam & Gas Assoc. has 2 L&M lathes, a 24" long bed, and a 12". Both from the collection of Joe Suydam, and museum-quality, as was all of his machinery. Tuckahoe acquired them from his estate sale, but we have no idea where he got them.

    Thanks for posting the design details.

    Jeff


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