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    Default lead screw function

    A few years back I bought a Lodge and Shipley 5 step conehead lathe. It was determined by John Oder that it was made in 1908. I never did post any pictures but I will within the next two weeks. Why I haven't gotten farther is a long story. So here is my question. Keep in mind while I'm not totally new to the machine I am fairly new to understanding function in detail.
    I have done a lot of cleaning, replaced motor leads and tested motor. I have removed the spindle and the headstock. More cleaning and ready for paint.
    The lead screw is completely attached to the bed of the lathe. The gear train that would drive the leadscrew is of course disengaged. The gear on the far left end of the leadscrew that slides on the keyed shaft is in tact. The four position thread selector box has been removed. Everything else, the carriage, apron and cross slide are all in place. What is the most efficient, and safe way to turn the leadscrew by hand so as not to mar, bend or chip a tooth on the far left gear. Half nut disengaged and the feed lever in the neutral position I imagine?
    Number 2. The 5 step conehead has 2 allen set screws. One in the large pulley and one in the small pulley. I believe these are for removing so one can squirt a little oil down onto the internal part of the spindle. The allen set screw on the large pulley threaded thru thanks to me and is bouncing around a little in side the cavity of the pulley. To get it out should I just drill slightly larger hole, get a long skinny magnet retrieve it, and retapp the oil hole for a larger set screw? Thank you all for reading. Any and all information and ideas is greatly appreciated. Clyde

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    Quote Originally Posted by steelsponge View Post
    The allen set screw on the large pulley threaded thru thanks to me and is bouncing around a little in side the cavity of the pulley. To get it out should I just drill slightly larger hole, get a long skinny magnet retrieve it, and retapp the oil hole for a larger set screw? Thank you all for reading. Any and all information and ideas is greatly appreciated. Clyde
    Don't drill.

    - Use a needle in a pin vise, then dressmakers pins to manipulate it and line it up with the existing threaded hole,

    - Once "fixed" in a position, use sprays to get the Allen socket CLEAN.

    - Epoxy the long leg of a CLEAN Allen key into the CLEAN socket.

    - Let Epoxy harden

    - Use the Epoxied-in Allen key to align it with the threads and back it all the way out.

    - Replace if a standard size.

    - If no easy replacement, warm it with a torch until the Epoxy yields, clean it up. Re-use it.

    This is not the only way to avoid drilling. Others may have one or more better ways.

    "It's PM!"

    "For example.." I have reverse-action pliers for handling snap-rings & c.
    "many" varieties. I could directly grip even a rather TINY Allen-hex socket by opposing walls, not need the Epoxy trick.

    "You Mileage May Vary". but no need to damage the step pulley.


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    Big water pump pliers with heavy leather pads to protect screw

    Or make a hard wood clamp

    If you are taking things apart it would seem a natural to have bearing caps off, shims recorded and spindle out with cone pulley slipped off to get the set screw out. Also an excellent time to clean up spindle bearing lube features - may be old enough to have the little ring with BUCKETS as part of that system mid away along the journals

    Small central view shows the "ring with buckets" from 1905

    ls-1905-crop.jpg
    Last edited by johnoder; 01-30-2021 at 10:23 AM.

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    yes john it is old enough to have the ring with buckets for lubrication. I'll have pics. soon My android would not let me upload my pics. on to my PC. Not sure which end to start removing gears and such. There doesn't appear to be any taper pins. Second gear from the left appears to be pressed on. The one that mates up with the left back gear.
    Thermite somehow there is a burr at the bottom of the threaded set screw hole I will never be able to fish it out I don't think. If I can take the spindle apart , then no problem. Not sure I'm confident enough to try not knowing how it was put together. Bull gear appears to be pressed on also. I thought drilling a slightly larger hole teasing it out with a magnet and retapping would work sweet. But maybe not. The other set screw somebody way b 4 me rounded out the allen hole and so far cant get it out as well.. That one is doable though. apics in a few days guys Thanks clyde

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    Quote Originally Posted by steelsponge View Post
    Thermite somehow there is a burr at the bottom of the threaded set screw hole I will never be able to fish it out I don't think. If I can take the spindle apart , then no problem. Not sure I'm confident enough to try not knowing how it was put together. Bull gear appears to be pressed on also. I thought drilling a slightly larger hole teasing it out with a magnet and retapping would work sweet. But maybe not. The other set screw somebody way b 4 me rounded out the allen hole and so far cant get it out as well.. That one is doable though. apics in a few days guys Thanks clyde
    Just run a bottoming tap down it and fiddle a bit AND/OR/ELSE make yerself a de-burr "hook" off a cheap "needle" file, heat with torch, shape, re-quench, draw to file-hard temper, stone it sharp. Clean-up the burr. No big deal. It need not be perfect to let the SHS get started properly.

    Running a TINY magnet downhole chasing after a steel screw under an Iron sheave, with a steel spindle and a raft of chips from drilling around and behind it sounds too much like trying to bring an unemployed migrant copper-snake into compliance with a Mexican Divorce decree to me to even bother starting at it.


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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Just run a bottoming tap down it and fiddle a bit AND/OR/ELSE make yerself a de-burr "hook" off a cheap "needle" file, heat with torch, shape, re-quench, draw to file-hard temper, stone it sharp. Clean-up the burr. No big deal. It need not be perfect to let the SHS get started properly.

    Running a TINY magnet downhole chasing after a steel screw under an Iron sheave, with a steel spindle and a raft of chips from drilling around and behind it sounds too much like trying to bring an unemployed migrant copper-snake into compliance with a Mexican Divorce decree to me to even bother starting at it.

    Well put L M A O. One way or another I will get it Thank You, Your humor is appreciated. One of my favorites is " Would be like trying to teach a rattlesnake to fetch a newspaper " Clyde

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    Quote Originally Posted by steelsponge View Post
    Well put L M A O. One way or another I will get it Thank You, Your humor is appreciated. One of my favorites is " Would be like trying to teach a rattlesnake to fetch a newspaper " Clyde
    But here I was..wondering how you planned to teach a magnet how to AIM... so it only grabbed the screw.. not the rest of an Iron Universe?

    Snakes? No need to "train" them.

    Mate of mine, clearing stumps, Tidewater, Virginia stepped directly atop a coiled rattler poised to strike that had misjudged the approach stride timing of a six foot six long legged guy. Size fifteen boot had the poor bugger's head trapped. All the rattler could do was flap the free part of his coils against the side of a 240 lb man's massive boots!

    Geoge thought it over, then departed the snake with a leap like he MEANT it!

    Snake bits near-as-dammit immediately out-did that leap by easily four to one on altitude alone.

    One stick of forty-percent dynamite used as a hand-grenade does tend to sort of "levitate" stuff without much care if the bits are still moving in directional agreement with each other.

    So I'd steer well clear of dynamite on the lathe.

    Most anything ELSE goes, though!


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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Wasn't that hard. First, you train the MICE the rattler wants to eat. Then there is the duct tape part..



    But here I was..wondering how you planned to teach a magnet how to AIM... so it only grabbed the screw.. not the rest of an Iron Universe!

    ??
    Well You use one magnet on the outside of the sheave, pulley, put it on the pulley and run the magnet around it repeatedly while also having a small round magnet in the hole just a little. As the shavings, filings follow the one magnet they will be grabbed by the magnet in the hole. including the set screw. So I imagine. Hence just a wisker of a larger hole just big enough for the set screw to fit through. then tap the hole for the slightly larger set screw and WAW LAW!

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    Quote Originally Posted by steelsponge View Post
    Well You use one magnet on the outside of the sheave, pulley, put it on the pulley and run the magnet around it repeatedly while also having a small round magnet in the hole just a little. As the shavings, filings follow the one magnet they will be grabbed by the magnet in the hole. including the set screw. So I imagine. Hence just a wisker of a larger hole just big enough for the set screw to fit through. then tap the hole for the slightly larger set screw and WAW LAW!
    Point of pride to not HAVE to drill and tap oversize.

    Then again, I'd find a better way to lube the bugger.

    Not as if humankind hasn't learnt a trick or two since it as built.

    Yah can DIY mold Silicone rubber pop-out plugs easily enough:

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    But here I was..wondering how you planned to teach a magnet how to AIM... so it only grabbed the screw.. not the rest of an Iron Universe?

    Snakes? No need to "train" them.

    Mate of mine, clearing stumps, Tidewater, Virginia stepped directly atop a coiled rattler poised to strike that had misjudged the approach stride timing of a six foot six long legged guy. Size fifteen boot had the poor bugger's head trapped. All the rattler could do was flap the free part of his coils against the side of a 240 lb man's massive boots!

    Geoge thought it over, then departed the snake with a leap like he MEANT it!

    Snake bits near-as-dammit immediately out-did that leap by easily four to one on altitude alone.

    One stick of forty-percent dynamite used as a hand-grenade does tend to sort of "levitate" stuff without much care if the bits are still moving in directional agreement with each other.

    So I'd steer well clear of dynamite on the lathe.

    Most anything ELSE goes, though!

    Ah! Men with insight, Men in Granite, And lets not forget Men with dynamite, No disrespect to Mr. Morrison, Although I don't think he ever blew up a snake or for that matter sent one on a ride that he will never forget! Yes we have learned a few things since then,"If we were paying attention!" Come to think of it "thermite" your name sake, at least on PM has some explosive properties as well. Steel sponge is well not in high demand. L O L

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    Quote Originally Posted by steelsponge View Post
    "thermite" your name sake, at least on PM has some explosive properties as well.
    "Pyrotechnic", rather. Or a fire near-as-dammit impossible to put out, once ignited!



    Neat stuff, childhood onward, as Dad had once dropped the twisted steel of a failed bridge middle of town, Morgantown/Westover WV, without breaking any windows or putting any torch-wielders safety at risk. Did a lot MORE, wreckage of Germany, War Two. And not only.

    Hiss, even a roar, rather than a rude bang, but "Thermate" as it was prepackaged when came my own turn to put it to work, be VERY useful stuff.



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