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  1. #21
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    jd-2020-a15.jpg 9. jd-2020-a16.jpg 10.

    Ader's 'Avion III'.

    I’ll keep an open mind, and suggest that the plane probably wasn't as daft as it looked.

    The propellers appear to be ..... feathered.

    More on the remarkable power plant later.

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  3. #22
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    Check out the Wikipedia page on it. It has a few more photos. It looks gorgeous hanging in that stairway.

    Ader Avion III - Wikipedia

    Thanks Asquith, that was fun. Maybe more of us should try posting strange things?

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  5. #23
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    wow! pretty much says it all...thanks for posting

  6. #24
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    jd-2020-a11.jpg 11. jd-2020-a6.jpg 12. jd-2020-a5.jpg 13. jd-2020-a14.jpg 14.

    Ader’s aircraft looks ridiculous, but people in the 19thC probably had more reason to be influenced by the success of flying creatures than by contraptions supported by stacks of rectangular wings.

    Regardless of our views on the aircraft, I'm highly impressed by the propulsion system, and the exceptional lengths Ader went to in reducing weight. I'd be surprised if anyone before him had gone to such trouble and expense. Of course, it was aeronautics that drove the need for extreme power-weight ratios. There was a huge flurry of activity in this field at the turn of the century, and I know little about other contemporary engine-makers’ efforts. The engine and boiler look remarkably modern, not least because of the lightweight pipe couplings, and the multi-bolt flanges, and the stainless-like appearance (presumably nickel-plated brass).

    Although the Avion’s engines were built in 1894-7, they closely follow Ader’s engine for his single prop 'Eole', built in 1890.

    The engines are tandem compound.

    The tubular boiler is methanol fired. There are thousands of microbore tubes connected to headers top and bottom. I assume that the curvature of the tubenest is intended to accommodate thermal expansion. The prominent domed vessel is the steam drum. There are two sight glasses to show the level, perhaps of limited value during aerobatics

    Steam is taken from the top of the drum (photo 11), via an internal separator, to a manifold with two valves which send steam to the HP cylinders. In front of the drum is a valve which, as far as I can make out, is a ‘simpling’ valve which allowed high pressure steam to be directed to the low pressure cylinders when more power was required, which might have been quite often

    The exhaust steam was condensed, the condenser sticking out of the top of the aircraft, making it look at bit less 'batty'.

    This drawing shows the power plant, including the fuel system:-

    http://alain.vassel.pagesperso-orang...haudiere2b.gif

    .... From this excellent website, several pages (in French):-

    Avion N°3-3

  7. #25
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    Getting off topic a bit, Ader also had a go at building cars (see edit note below).

    I have a book about the infamous Paris to Madrid race of 1903 in which several Ader cars were entered. All seven made it to the fore-shortened finish, though well down the listings.

    The book says that Ader worked on 90 degree V-engines from 1900, they used a forked conrod and single crankpin for each pair of cylinders. The same components could be used in 2, 4 and 8 cylinder V-engines.

    Inlet valves were atmospheric type. Exhaust valves operated by separate camshafts for each bank.

    Entered in the race were 2 cylinder 12 hp (80 x 100mm), 4 cylinder 16 hp (80 x 90mm), and 8 cylinder 32 hp cars.

    Here is one of the 32 hp Ader V8's entered in the 1903 race. Note the surface carburetor on the bulkhead.

    ader-v8-engine-1903.jpg


    Edit: I have no idea if Clement Ader was personally involved with the cars bearing his name. The cars were apparently built by the Société industrielle des téléphones, who produced telephone equipment using Ader's designs. Perhaps they used Ader's name because it was well-known? Or was Mr Ader an early gear-head who like the sound of a V8 engine...
    Last edited by Peter S; 03-29-2020 at 07:14 PM.

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  9. #26
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    Early Cappuccino Machine?

    CarlBoyd

  10. #27
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    Did it actually fly???

  11. #28
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    May cause skinny pants, Hitler Youth haircuts & possibly even some goth tendencies.
    What? No purple hair?

    Good job on the mind-tickler.

    Joe in NH


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