Which manufacturer is this...?
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  1. #1
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    Default Which manufacturer is this...?

    Hello,
    Does anyone know who manufactured this lathe?
    I have recently bought it, so it is now on its way to my workshop for restoration and upgrading.

    Kind regards
    Mikael
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails bb11d695-0b87-40b9-a783-031e7f8542c5.jpg  

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    I dunno who made it, but the only upgrade I can think of is sending it to the scrap yard...

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    Hello Mikael,
    More and larger pictures would help in identification. Looks to have been setup for specific production work. What are your plans for it?
    regards

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    Looks like a very nice and curvy early screw machine or special operation lathe. It would be great for making repetitive parts in a fun shop.

    Thanks for posting and welcome to the PM.

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    Very early small size turret lathe; nice machine.

    I guessed Bardons & Oliver. but I I now don't think so. Pratt & Whitney still had these--similar appearing but more modern--in a 1916 catalog, calling them 'Hand Screw Machines.' Brown & Sharpe had later looking ones in a 1906 catalog, calling them 'Plain Screw Machines.'

    I'd like to know who made it.

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    Looks VERY similar to my Pratt & Whitney No. 0 Hand Screw Machine - but - the legs are curved "differently" and it does not have Parkhurst's patented feed motion.

    P&W did make a lot of "custom" machines by the late 1800s. And being a special operation machine it may not have had need for Parkhurst's improvement.

    Its a "survivor." And a throw-back to a non-Central Grid electric motor age. When all goes down in a technological heap THIS one would keep going.

    Well, assuming enough technical smarts on the part of its user to "cobble something together."

    Isn't that what all technology is?

    Joe in NH

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    Quote Originally Posted by plastikdreams View Post
    I dunno who made it, but the only upgrade I can think of is sending it to the scrap yard...
    Thanks for tour thoughts, I will consider that as an option.... or....maybe not. : )

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    Mikael, it might help if you gave us your location. Most folks here know American and British manufacturers well, less so for the rest of the world.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fciron View Post
    Mikael, it might help if you gave us your location. Most folks here know American and British manufacturers well, less so for the rest of the world.
    Says Sweden at the top of all his posts...

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    Oh, doesn't show location in the mobile format. Now I know. 😑

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    The idea is to restore to a nice looking, high precision tool as it was some 10 decades ago. The biggest problem right now is that the transportation company (Schenker) dropped it to the ground from the fork lift...
    Of course, grey cast iron is brittle as glass, and it broke into pieces.
    Anyway, I brought it home and started to think about how to get it into shape again.
    I have ordered some UTP 8 high nickel welding electrodes as well as some ESAB OK92.18 electrodes. I have made some welding during the years, so now I almost look forward to do the repair. I may take some pictures during the process if someone is interested...?

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    Well, it WAS a survivor. It now may be scrap.

    Or maybe not - it may be a challenge - that is all.

    At one point I bought a Fay & Scott flat belt conehead woodworking lathe for small money. The reason the money was small was the foot was broken off of one of the legs leaving one leg perhaps 6" short - the former owner had operated it for YEARS with a cement block under the missing leg.

    Hmm, thinks I "This could be repaired with steel plate and some brazing/grinding." Which I did. Got to try out the new Sears Oxyacetylene torch for cutting plate and later doing the braze.

    Not generally known, braze frequently exceeds the strength of the cast iron to which it is attached to - and it gives the brazier a fair amount of "build up - melt down" capability for fairing braze fill between sections. It grinds considerably easier than most cast iron nickel welding rod and is certainly more forgiving on formation of shrink cracks.

    By the time the Fay & Scott was done and painted, one would not know it had been repaired. I sold it without mention of the repair for about 3x what I had in it. Slightly larger small money than I paid but I was confident the buyer had gotten value from his purchase.

    Good luck on bringing this back. Yes, we would be interested in your success story, if one is to be had.

    Joe in NH

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe in NH View Post
    Well, it WAS a survivor. It now may be scrap.

    Or maybe not - it may be a challenge - that is all.

    At one point I bought a Fay & Scott flat belt conehead woodworking lathe for small money. The reason the money was small was the foot was broken off of one of the legs leaving one leg perhaps 6" short - the former owner had operated it for YEARS with a cement block under the missing leg.

    Hmm, thinks I "This could be repaired with steel plate and some brazing/grinding." Which I did. Got to try out the new Sears Oxyacetylene torch for cutting plate and later doing the braze.

    Not generally known, braze frequently exceeds the strength of the cast iron to which it is attached to - and it gives the brazier a fair amount of "build up - melt down" capability for fairing braze fill between sections. It grinds considerably easier than most cast iron nickel welding rod and is certainly more forgiving on formation of shrink cracks.

    By the time the Fay & Scott was done and painted, one would not know it had been repaired. I sold it without mention of the repair for about 3x what I had in it. Slightly larger small money than I paid but I was confident the buyer had gotten value from his purchase.

    Good luck on bringing this back. Yes, we would be interested in your success story, if one is to be had.

    Joe in NH
    I agree with Joe on brazing. You could tack it up with the nickel to hold the position then finish with brass. I have done that with exhaust manifolds. You may be better with the nickel rod than I am. I like brazing cast iron.

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    Quote Originally Posted by plastikdreams View Post
    I dunno who made it, but the only upgrade I can think of is sending it to the scrap yard...
    Helpful input, especially in the sub forum concerning antique machinery and history!

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    kkkkkkkkkkggggggg.jpg

    A little/larger look.


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