A marvelous wrought iron blacksmith vice. - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Question for Zakary or Panhard about making threads by wrapping steel around a mandrel:

    Could they be made by wrapping around the mandrel, removed, brazed in, and used as is?

    I would guess that you would want one helix a bit small and the other a bit large so that they don't move around during brazing. That would mean quite a bit more fuss and bother. Is this a real concern?

    Katou

    ps. I ask because I've always wanted a blacksmithing flypress, but I couldn't figure out how to make the nut and bolt cheap enough.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by katou View Post
    Question for Zakary or Panhard about making threads by wrapping steel around a mandrel:

    Could they be made by wrapping around the mandrel, removed, brazed in, and used as is?

    I would guess that you would want one helix a bit small and the other a bit large so that they don't move around during brazing. That would mean quite a bit more fuss and bother. Is this a real concern?

    Katou

    ps. I ask because I've always wanted a blacksmithing flypress, but I couldn't figure out how to make the nut and bolt cheap enough.
    I hate to hijack a thread topic, but there aren't many blacksmithing discussions here. A flypress needs a multiple-start thread to work properly--the weight has to come down fast. I don't think you would have much fun, or success, trying to hand wrap such a thread.

    Post vise threads aren't required to do that. And to return to the OP, the threads on this vise look nearly new, which is very nice indeed. They are often quite worn.

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  4. #23
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    It looks to me like the vise is completely hand forged,but the screw and nut were bought and used. That,or else the original screw and nut got worn out,and were replaced with the screw and nut now present.

    The workmanship in the screw assembly and in the vise are completely different.

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  6. #24
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    Here is the vise cleaned up and mounted for use.I need to change the pivot bolt with a correct one with nut..and install a spring.I have a thick shim taking up the space where the spring would be clamped by the yoke and cotter.I truly appreciate all the comments about the vise...keep them coming!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 100_1425.jpg   100_1423.jpg   100_1424.jpg  

  7. #25
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    Lester, that looks good. For the spring just use a piece of mild steel flat bar, of the right size and dont look back. Most steels have the same resistance to bending, some will bend farther and still return, vice springs move a very short distance.... Mild is the right answer. All you need to do is bend it the right amount and ideally forge the little ears on the end opposite the clamp to keep it on the leg. Some also have a 90* bend at the top so it stays under the clamp, I will have to at the peter wrights I have to see if it should be there or not.
    Rob

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  9. #26
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    My thoughts
    1) I have two vises at the house with an almost identical nut and bench mounts. They bare no makers name but have similar assembly marks and I suspect they were made in the same shop.
    The vise does not look super unusual in any way.

    2) JW mark - The most common marks seen on leg vises are numbers indicating the weight. I would guess this is an owners mark if it only apperars one place. If its on all the major parts its probably an assemby mark to keep parts together.

    3) construction - typical of vises from mid to late 1800's. Most likely made with an open die steam hammer in some kind of production shop. The vise is forged from a bar and split to open for the nut, the hinge is forge welded.
    The nut and knob for the screw have a little cosmetic refinement, but the rest of the vise is utilitarian. Table mount is typical for older vises and requires no standard fastners. The nut is cast. This is normal for parts made in a production shop and what wares out.
    Steel jaws are not uncommon.

    4) The hinge pin bolt may give some clues about the age of the pin and the vise. Does it have a standard thread diameter, form and pitch? Does the thread in the mating nut taper from side to side? A shop made bolt could be an old replacemten or it could be an indication of age. You will have to be the judge of that.

    Fix the hinge pin, straighten the leg, add a spring and go to work.

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  11. #27
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    Some vises of that era used a pin with cotter instead of a threaded nut for the hinge pin.

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  13. #28
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    Default vise photos

    "I thought since we are talking about early post vises, I would share pictures of my favorite post vise. It is circa 1500 made in Germany. Wish I owned it Best regards, Jake
    " etc.

    I have been thinking that it was too late to reply to this, but see from my statistics that many people are still viewing it. So-- you are welcome to use my photographs non-commercially. I do, however, require that you attribute them to me, and that you provide a link to my web site. As I state there (Image Usage),

    All photographs © Genevra Kornbluth.
    If you wish to use any on your own non-commercial web site, please include one of the following links:
    www.KornbluthPhoto.com
    or
    www.KornbluthPhoto.com/archive-1.html

    best regards,
    GK

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  15. #29
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    That would be a nice idea for one of todays smiths to replicate.

  16. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by JL Sargent View Post
    On the subject of a replacement spring. Old buggy springs can work out really well or very light leaf springs from a trailer or such. I have made them from heavier leaf springs but they tend to be too stiff.

    the "teeth" from spring-tooth harrows, or from landscaping "rock rakes", work quite well.

    ------------------

    I suspect many "shop made" post vises, used "store bought" screws and boxes.


    I have an unmarked, hand-forged 5" vise, that has a machine turned screw and box, that are fitted into the vise, by the use of split bushings.

    It seems apparent to me, that in this case, an older, hand forged vise was "repaired", by fitting a new, "store bought" screw and box.

    I further suspect, this would have a very common practice.



    .

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  18. #31
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    Nice looking leg vise.

    We scrapped a few which were more or less exactly the same, about ten years ago.

    They look nice, but the jaws are almost never truly closing parallel , and for a lot of jobs they can be quite slow and frustrating to work with.

    Over here in the UK, you can pick them up for about $20, which is very cheap, for what you are getting, but most folk do not want to know about industrial heritage, and so they sell cheaply.

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  20. #32
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    Having owned and repaired/ restored many post/leg vises in my life (40yrs. a restoration blacksmith) my guess is that you have a vise from the later half of the 19th century thats screw box has been replaced with one from an earlier period. The box appears to be from the mid 18th century to mid 19th.

    Also it's hard to tell from the photo but I think the screw box is iron also and the brass you see is the remnants left from brazing the threads in. Late 18th and up to mid 19th century screws were typically cut male threads with the female thread wrapped in the male then unscrewed and brazed in the tube of the box.

    One thing is certain it is NOT a Peter Wright.

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  22. #33
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    A second look at the screw box tells me it might be bronze but it's hard to see. If the finial and all is bronze then it IS cast and that would make it (the screw box) 18th century. The most significant feature that puts the vise at a latter date is the lack of champhering on the legs.


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