Monarch 16CY coolant pump recommendation
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  1. #1
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    Default Monarch 16CY coolant pump recommendation

    These old monarch's came with nice big chip pans with an integral sump for flood coolant. On mine and i think others there is what looks to be a coolant suction pipe for an external horizontal pump where the pump would sit on the floor below the chip pan and the discharge would be hard piped to a clamp on the carriage. My machine has no pump and when i finally get it into place, i'm pretty sure i'll want to run flood coolant. I think i could either run a vertical pump which would basically put the pump in the sump of the chip pan keeping the floor under the machine clear. I can see this as an advantage when it comes to keeping the shop floor clean but would likely complicate cleaning the sump. If i fit the thing with a horizontal pump i clutter the floor but the sump is nice and accessible for cleaning.

    Any opinions?

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    The CW came with the front mounted exterior pump which maybe someday I'll use. This is on a bracket off the front or left hand leg

    There is no question that this is FLOOD - the plumbing is 1" pipe (1.32" O.D.)

    There is a round strainer in the same general area on the back (though further aft) - one could lift this off and modify it for a vertical pump. If cord came up the same way it could simply be lifted out come sump cleaning time

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    Quote Originally Posted by marka12161 View Post
    These old monarch's came with nice big chip pans with an integral sump for flood coolant. On mine and i think others there is what looks to be a coolant suction pipe for an external horizontal pump where the pump would sit on the floor below the chip pan and the discharge would be hard piped to a clamp on the carriage. My machine has no pump and when i finally get it into place, i'm pretty sure i'll want to run flood coolant. I think i could either run a vertical pump which would basically put the pump in the sump of the chip pan keeping the floor under the machine clear. I can see this as an advantage when it comes to keeping the shop floor clean but would likely complicate cleaning the sump. If i fit the thing with a horizontal pump i clutter the floor but the sump is nice and accessible for cleaning.

    Any opinions?
    10EE is "close enough" in layout the idea of a pump-in-the-sump sounded attractive at first.

    But then.. I'd not have the much higher volume to assure a reliably steady flow, nor the ability of the larger offboard tankage (cheap Chinee grocery store crab fest steamer pot) to provide that flow and still have effective "as you go" settling and filtering. My rig meant to be castered to more than one machine, stingy as I am about coolant brewing, time, and stink-wastage for such rare use as dedicated procrastination leaves time for.

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    I just did a search on your model lathe, there are some nice photos on the world wide net that show mounting, location and plumbing of the pump. as to using flood coolant, absolutely! I love mine when drilling deep holes, flood oil on hss or insert drills, keeps everything cool, chips roll right out without pecking, often near mirror finish with sharp tools. I often drill holes well over 1" dia and 6" deep in alloy steel without drawing bit back more than a couple times no problems on the American Pacemaker. also any oil in the ways and chuck keeps everything lubed as opposed to water based tends to cause damage ( all of my machines had to have repairs from water coolant damage caused by previous owners)as a result we run oil in all of our machines, cheap hydraulic oil sometimes thinned a bit with kerosene works fine for most metals and operations unless threading tricky metals. and no, fires are not a problem, for those skeptics who claim otherwise.


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